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Gerhard Spicker - Auto, Motorrad, Oldtimer
Lives in 46399 Bocholt - Spork
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1961 Ferrari 250 TRI61
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+Gerhard Spicker - Auto, Motorrad, Oldtimer​ wünsche dir eine geruhsame gute Nacht. ... Knuddelbussy 🙆 😺 Miaumiau 🐾 🐾 💋 💋 
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1917 Crow Lakester Custom
The car, registered for road use as a 1917 Crow Lakester Custom, was hand-built from the wing tip tank of a Lockheed Super Constellation and uses a mix of automotive and aircraft parts. Wedged inside the tank is a 1.8-liter turbocharged Hemi four-cylinder mated to a five-speed manual transmission, and the two-person
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Delage D8 (1929 - 1940)
The Delage D8 was an eight-cylinder luxury car produced by the manufacturer between 1929 and 1940. The 4061 cc engine of the original D8 placed it in the 23CV car tax band which, for many contemporaries, would also have defined its position high up in the market hierarchy. Delage took a traditional view of its role as a car producer, and provided cars in bare chassis form to have their bodies fitted by one of the more prestigious bespoke body builders operating (in most cases) in the Paris area. The D8 therefore appeared, throughout its life, in a wide variety of (frequently) elegant shapes. At launch there were two versions of the D8 : the “D8 Normale” and the “D8 S”. For the “D8 Normale” there were three different wheelbase lengths: these were 3,167 mm (124.7 in), 3,467 mm (136.5 in) and 4,066 mm (160.1 in), the third of which would accommodate body lengths of more than 5 meters. The “D8 S” was intended for sports car applications, and the shortened wheelbase was intended to optimize manoeuvrability and handling. Both versions were produced till 1933. The "Delage D8" was powered by a straight 8 engine which was a first both for Delage and for the French auto-industry. The 4061cc engine featured an overhead centrally positioned camshaft and a listed maximum output of 102 hp (76 kW) at 3,500 rpm for the “D8 Normale” and 120 hp (89 kW) in the “D8 S” version. Power was delivered to the rear wheels through a four speed manual gear-box featuring synchromesh on the upper two ratios. Performance will have varied according to the weight of the body specified but the top speed listed for the "D8 Normale" was 120 km/h (75 mph) with 130 km/h (82 mph) listed for the "D8 S".
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1933 MG K3 Magnette
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1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato
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1968 Alfa Romeo 33 Iguana (ItalDesign)
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1968 Porsche 907 Longtail
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Hardcastle & McCormick and The Coyote X [1983 up to 1986]
The car that McCormick drove, the Coyote X, was built from custom molds based on the McLaren M6GT. The original Coyote X was molded, modified and assembled by Mike Fennel. The nose, windshield doors and lower body (minus the ventral intakes) are faithful representations of the McLaren; the cut down rear deck, however, was a custom component that became a feature on many Manta Montage kits with damaged or removed rear windows. The most noticeable differences between the Coyotes and Mantas are the wheel wells, roll pan height and shape, and the fact that the Coyote has a one piece front clip that terminates about an inch before and surrounding the windshield. Most of the cars made for the show were molded and assembled by either Mike Fennel or Unique Movie Cars. Like many kit cars of the time, the car uses a chassis from a Volkswagen Beetle and its engine from a Porsche 914. For the second and third seasons, producers used a different Coyote which was based on a De Lorean DMC-12, as Brian Keith had difficulty getting in and out of the original Coyote. The Season 2 and Season 3 Coyote does not resemble the Manta, as the front is larger than the original, making the car resemble a front-engined car. A Season 1 car that was used in the production of Hardcastle and McCormick is owned by a private owner in southern New Jersey. The stunt car was reconfigured for the Knight Rider 2000 television pilot, then consequently turned into Jay Ohrberg's show car "Taz-Mobile". In April 2011, the car was sold and shipped to Texas where it will be re-bodied back to its Coyote configuration, retaining as many of the original Coyote pieces as possible. A Season 2 car appeared briefly on the sixth episode of Season 5 of the sitcom Married... with Children.
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The rarest Talbot Lago T150C SS Roadster Figoni & Falaschi
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Le Mans-winning Aston Martin DBR1
Three were the men instrumental to Aston Martin’s victory at Le Mans in 1959 – designer Ted Cutting, driver Carroll Shelby, and driver Roy Salvadori. After securing the rights to the Lagonda dual overhead-camshaft six-cylinder engine in the late 1940s, David Brown set out on a goal of winning Le Mans for Aston Martin, a goal that would be stymied by the DB3S, a capable car introduced in 1953 that managed to fall short of expectations even after a second-place showing at Le Mans. Thus Cutting began to work on designing a new spaceframe chassis in 1956; though it still used the DB3S front and rear suspensions and disc brakes, the resulting DBR1 ended up both stiffer and lighter. Paired with the 254hp 3.0L six-cylinder and a David Brown transverse gearbox, the DBR1 hit the competition circuit in 1957. The following year should have been its year, with more powerful cars outlawed by a regulation change limiting sports prototypes to 3.0 liters of displacement, but no Aston Martin works cars finished the 1958 Le Mans. Unshaken, Brown continued with the DBR1 in 1959, entering three cars in that year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans. Stirling Moss in DBR1/3 set the pace for the first 70 or so laps, prompting the Ferraris to chase and drop out, while Shelby and Salvadori, piloting DBR1/2 (wearing number 5) slipped in for the overall win, followed immediately after by Maurice Trintignant and Paul Frere in DBR1/4. Ferrari 250 GTs blocked off the next four finishing positions, all at least 25 laps behind the DBR1s. Aston Martin would go on to win that year’s World Championship, and DBR1/2 would remain active through the early 1960s. A United Kingdom-based collector reportedly owns it today.
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1954 Mercedes W196
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Lamborghini Miura Jota
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