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Kristen Marhaver
Works at Carmabi Research Station
Attended Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
Lives in Willemstad, Curacao
9,925 followers|103,873 views
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Kristen Marhaver

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Micro-Cosmos: Coral symbionts (dinoflagellates) glowing red under our fancy new, used fluorescence microscope
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Good question! No stains used here, you're seeing autofluorescence from two different types of cells: red fluorescence from the pigments in the algal symbiont cells and green fluorescence from the coral cells (this "GFP" or green fluorescent protein is the same molecule used all across molecular biology to tag and follow things that don't fluoresce on their own.. invented by corals and jellyfish!)
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Kristen Marhaver

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Finally digging myself out from under the heap of pictures taken during the last six months of fieldwork... more tiny wonders to follow!
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Mike Taylor is preaching to our choir here but this is an Open Science must-read for its resolve-strengthening powers:
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Kristen Marhaver

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Geniuses, can you help ID this mystery seafoam for the Curacao newspaper? It floated ashore yesterday when the wind shifted - definitely organic, but what is it?? (Pinging +Chris Mallory for your expertise on biology and your expertise about biology experts!)
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Got me. Though I'd buy the tar bubbles explanation, esp. since it's from Curaçao. Remnants of the summer's spill? Or are there natural seeps offshore near Venezuela?
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Kristen Marhaver

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In case all this Open Access Week stuff sounds what's-the-point-? to you, the G+ genius bank, here's a nice piece by the Guardian explaining what #OpenAccess publishing is all about...

Says the Guardian, "The academic publishing game has changed irrevocably."

Impressively, 17% of academic papers are now published open access. And this number will surely rise: the UK has a new policy requiring all publicly-funded research published after April 2013 to be published open access or submitted to open-access repositories.

Academic publishing may be the LAST realm of publishing to be revolutionized by the internet... but it's happening at last, and it's happening fast!
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to be you cant file story 
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Kristen Marhaver

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In honor of Open Access Week, (attn +Open Science Federation) the Royal Society is making all of their content open access until November 29! This is a truly admirable move and one that complements their recent decision to make a huge back catalog of journal articles open access forever. Browse around at: http://royalsocietypublishing.org/

And in case you were simply dying to read some research from here on Curacao about microbial communities on coral reefs... NOW is your chance!
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Kristen Marhaver

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I'm glad this issue has reached the public's eye. Unsurprisingly, the #openaccess publishing revolution in academia has attracted both eager idealists and seedy opportunists...  Most worrisome is the fact that good resumes are now more difficult to tell from the purchased and padded ones.
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+Kristen Marhaver +Tristan Carland I'm not arguing against research in basic sciences. Basic human curiosity will never be contained. And since most basic science research today works on patronage basis, it'll continue to be funded by governments and/or foundations.

  I'm talking about the system we're using to tell good science from bad science. We get a very rough approximation of that information by the words "published in Nature" vs "published in the proceedings of mid-south-western-alabama meeting of sciency folks". This gives those journals an inordinate amount of power to a) set the direction of scientific research and b) rake in cash by the truckloads.

   I'm proposing doing away with the forced proxy of "prestigious journals" and allow direct crowd-sourcing of quality scores for publications (and people).  This will remove lots of artificial barriers to good science research, separate the wheat from the chaff  and democratize participation in science. 
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And if you want to set some PDFs free without the TOS-violationy flavor of JSTOR Liberator...

Caveat quote from +Jonathan Eisen: "The license on the PDF may affect what people can do with them if they feel constrained to follow the law"
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+V.D. Veksler - This may be relevant to your earlier question.
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Now it gets interesting. Caveat quote: "If you are scared about violating a TOS, then don't violate TOS."

#OpenAccess #PDFtribute  
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A must-read for all academics, with arguments like: "Dammit, we're scientists. Our job is to make knowledge. If we make it, then brick it up behind a wall, we're wasting our time and our funders' money – which ultimately means we're squandering the world's wealth."

Tear down the paywall!
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Yeah, they have been the target of a boycott and some pretty brilliant parody (see @FakeElsevier on Twitter...) because of their particularly aggressive anti- #OpenAccess moves like supporting the Research Works Act last year. However they did open up their archive to the National Association of Science Writers last year... I'm holding out hope for them
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Love this article! It's true: You Google wrong. But you can learn to Google less wrong than most...  
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Shameless #openaccessweek  self-promotion! This is a piece I wrote for #ScienceProgress  a while back about why ecosystem conservation depends on free and open access to scientific research. We can't hold our elected officials accountable, and we all-too-easily ignore expert warnings, when we can't get our own hands on the science or understand what it means.
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Have them in circles
9,925 people
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Emir Şevkioğlu's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Coral Biologist
Skills
Marine biology, conservation, microbiology, public speaking, wrangling coral larvae
Employment
  • Carmabi Research Station
    NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences, 2014 - present
  • Carmabi Foundation
    Associate Scientist, 2010 - present
  • UC Merced
    Postdoctoral Researcher, 2011 - 2013
  • TED
    TEDGlobal Fellow, 2012
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Willemstad, Curacao
Previously
Willemstad, Curacao - Merced, CA - San Diego, CA - Atlanta, GA - Twin Cities, MN - Wichita, KS
Story
Tagline
I can sort coral larvae by size if you need me to.
Introduction
coral biologist, TED fellow, underwater photographer, artist, runner, traveler, science communications cheerleader. seeking wonder around every corner.
Education
  • Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
    Marine Biology, 2010
  • B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology
    Applied Biology, 2004