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Sebastián Ármannsson
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(10 June 2014) --- In the International Space Station's Harmony node, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, harvests a crop of red romaine lettuce plants that were grown from seed inside the station's Veggie facility, a low-cost plant growth chamber that uses a flat-panel light bank for plant growth and crew observation. For the Veg-01 experiment, researchers are testing and validating the Veggie hardware, and the plants will be returned to Earth to determine food safety.
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NASA scientists have discovered a strange coronal hole, almost square in its shape, on the surface of the Sun. 

A coronal hole is an area where high-speed solar wind streams into space. It appears dark in extreme ultraviolet light as there is less material to emit in these wavelengths. Inside the coronal hole you can see bright loops where the hot plasma outlines little pieces of the solar magnetic field sticking above the surface. Because it is positioned so far south on the Sun, there is less chance that the solar wind stream will impact us here on Earth.

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA.
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The Ghost Nebula

http://www-kpno.kpno.noao.edu/pr0001.htm
Image credit:  T.A. Rector/University of Alaska Anchorage, H. Schweiker/WIYN and NOAO/AURA/NSF
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"The very act of understanding is a celebration of joining, merging, even if on a very modest scale, with the magnificence of the cosmos. Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality." - Carl Sagan
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In this Hubble image, we can see an almost face-on view of the galaxy NGC 1084. At first glance, this galaxy is pretty unoriginal. Like the majority of galaxies that we observe it is a spiral galaxy, and, as with about half of all spirals, it has no bar running through its loosely wound arms. However, although it may seem unremarkable on paper, NGC 1084 is actually a near-perfect example of this type of galaxy — and Hubble has a near-perfect view of it.

NGC 1084 has hosted several violent events known as supernovae — explosions that occur when massive stars, many times more massive than the sun, approach their twilight years. As the fusion processes in their cores run out of fuel and come to an end, these stellar giants collapse, blowing off their outer layers in a violent explosion. Supernovae can often briefly outshine an entire galaxy, before then fading away over several weeks or months. Although directly observing one of these explosions is hard to do, in galaxies like NGC 1084 astronomers can find and study the remnants left behind.

Astronomers have noted five supernova explosions within NGC 1084 over the past half century. These remnants are named after the year in which they took place — 1963P, 1996an, 1998dl, 2009H, and 2012ec.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and S. Smartt (Queen's University Belfast), Acknowledgement: Brian Campbell
#nasa #hubble #telescope #space #universe #galaxy
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Beautiful.

Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 2903

The central bulge of this spiral galaxy seen almost face-on is composed of old stars giving a yellowish appearance, while the spiral amrs host younger stars denoted by their blue-light emission and star formation regions denoted by their red-light emission.

Credit: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/Coelum
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SEXY.

NGC 3314 is two large spiral galaxies.

Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA/Processing: Martin Pugh
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Milky Way Twin Galaxy

This picture of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6744, which could be the Milky Way's twin, was taken at the European Southern Observatory's La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Credit: ESO
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Cosmic Fountain

This interacting group contains several galaxies (called Arp 194), along with a "cosmic fountain" of stars, gas and dust that stretches over 100,000 light-years.

Hubble Photographs Cosmic FountainCredit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
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