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Felix Ling
Works at Sapling Learning
Attended UC Berkeley
Lives in Austin, TX
299 followers|3,456 views
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Felix Ling

commented on a video on YouTube.
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Nice runthrough. I've only recently started playing around with it, and my favorite features are the symmetry setting for the oscillators and the fade function in their envelopes. Plus it just sounds really awesome. Oh, and all the FX, which you can route other sound sources into.

What I hate is that I don't have your Behringer, and only have 8 knobs and 8 sliders to map to this thing. Man, it's going to take me forever to figure out a mapping I like.
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+alternatingbitmusic Yeah, that's what I've done so far (leaving out things like the 3rd oscillator, 2nd filter, etc.), but I'm probably going to rejigger the whole thing.

Anyway, I'm finding it a lot less daunting than Thor, I have to say, which has the same issue. Incidentally, my reaction to the Korg Polysix compared to Thor was the same as yours, and I was going to ask what you thought of Predator when I saw you already had a video on it!
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Okay, so I get that Google Reader looks different, but aside from that, I can't tell what's changed. It works the same for me. What's the hubbub all about?
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The very, very clunky way I was handling sharing was using Delicious to bookmark things, which propagates to my Friendfeed and then to my Facebook. This doesn't propagate the comment field, isn't hooked into G+, and I know Delicious has it's share of drama. Still, it works, so I think I'll stick to it until this whole Reader thing shakes out.
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Felix Ling

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Via Mark Interrante (aka Pinhole).
Raymond Johnson originally shared:
 
I found this on my office chalkboard this morning, thanks to +Ryan Grover. Attempt to reason through it if you must. #mathed
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My answer is E). It has no value (0%), and as it is not one of the given choices, has no chance of being selected randomly.
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Sometimes I just don't get economists. Take this article, for example. This comes from vox, an economics blog featuring some big names in the field and is much more policy-oriented and less partisan than a lot of other economics blogs I've seen.

Monacelli, Quadrini, and Trigari look into the troubling persistence of unemployment, which is a worthy and timely topic. This recession and recovery has been unusual in this regard, and many others have theorized that it has something to do with the extended deleveraging process, where firms are shedding a lot of debt and have less ability to borrow. As the authors note, however, firm liquidity and profits have already rebounded to their pre-recession levels, so firms ought to have enough funds and thus the ability to hire at their pre-recession rates.

So the authors theorize that the lower ability to borrow "places firms in a less favourable bargaining position, allowing workers to negotiate higher wages." In other words, the ability to hire is there, but the willingness is not. Well, the next logical step to me would be to look at wage growth to see whether it actually is higher than usual after a recession (of course, it is not). The next logical step to the authors, however, was instead to build a mathematical model which incorporates this line of thinking and then to "confirm" that indeed, their model shows persistent high unemployment too. This is the kind of thing that gets my coworkers in the physical sciences snickering (but hey, when you have a lab environment, science is easy).

What is particularly puzzling is that, if you are focusing on wage bargaining, you should realize that there's something about a recession that affects the bargaining power of workers. You know, that graph you started the article with? Yes, high unemployment. This, of course, greatly increases the competition for each open job spot and thus greatly weakens the bargaining power for a worker (especially a worker who has been unemployed for a few months, as is becoming more common during this recession). It's almost as if the authors had never participated in the labor market themselves.

Economics. More about the maths than about reality. <sigh>
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Bleh!
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Christopher Nielsen originally shared:
 
Pretty much sums it up.
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Felix Ling

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I'm appalled at how none of the cars get out of the way and stop.
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This recent payroll tax kerfuffle highlights a big problem with our current system. If we had a legislature that instead used a voting system that handles multiple items better than plurality (which doesn't scale up very well due to the spoiler effect), they could pick among several versions of a competing proposal and select the compromise version that satisfy the most people.

For example, Approval Voting where you vote yes for as many items as you want, the one with the most yes's wins (Yahoo groups used this as one of the options for its polls, and it's a great way for a group of friends to select a movie or a restaurant -- you can even give the losers a more heavily weighted vote the next time to be more inclusive and also mix things up more).

Such a system focuses on satisfying the greatest number of people, and thus easily removes killer amendments designed to create large benefits for the few and small costs for the many. It also avoids showdowns like the recent payroll tax debacle, as you don't need to craft the right piece of legislation and then have everybody vote up or down, but create multiple versions (say, one tax extension with that distracting oil pipeline, one without, one at 2 months, one at 1 year, etc.) and then picking the one that scores the highest.

Most importantly, it gives minorities a say in the final decision. They may not have the voting power to get their first choice, but they are likely to still get something that they support. Isn't that what democracy is supposed to do?
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Adrian's jack-o-lantern for Shep.
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Daniel Sheppard, FUCK YOUR FUCKING DAY YOU FUCKING DICK. And godspeed.
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Steve Horwitz on the gender wage gap. It's a pretty standard economic argument that I mostly agree with. As an Austrian economist, he's all about individual choice and thus frames it as women choosing to prioritize childcare and downplays society's role in pressuring and expecting women to prioritize it and for men to prioritize their careers. But I have to agree with his conclusion that the best way for this to change is for men to take on more of the childcare.

Which I have. Indeed, I negotiated a 30-hour work week for lower pay in order to do so. Alas, I don't seem to be part of a growing trend as far as I can tell.

Do Women Earn Less Than Men?
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Yeah, Horwitz is always worth listening to.
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There's a lot about Perry I don't like, but one thing I do is his desire to repeal the 17th Amendment. It's counterintuitive, but it would restore one of the checks and balances, namely states checking federal power.

Currently, Senators face an incentive to win votes and do it by bringing home pork. If Senators were, as originally designed, appointed by the state governments, they would face an incentive to support state power against federal power. Incidentally, this is how the German government works (except the Senate is the Bundesrat and the states are the Länder).

Direct elections were a nice idea, but it had perverse consequences (misguided populism). Those of you who are fans of the parliamentary system hopefully get the idea.

For more, Bruce Bartlett talked about this at length a while back: http://old.nationalreview.com/nrof_bartlett/bartlett200405120748.asp

(and thank gawd for Google+ not having a Twitterish character limit)
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This, by the way, not at all an endorsement of Rick Perry (as I hope was clear from my first sentence). Repealing the 17th Amendment is (along with PR), a pet issue of mine that just never gets talked about.
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People
In his circles
229 people
Have him in circles
299 people
Sparrow Passero's profile photo
Palinor Velasco's profile photo
Jimi Jean's profile photo
Ernie Hsiung's profile photo
Autumn Christian's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • Sapling Learning
    Economics Team Lead, 2011 - present
  • San Jose State University
    Economics Lecturer, 2009 - 2009
  • Aperto Networks
    Senior Software Engineer, 1999 - 2006
  • Proxim Wireless
    Software Engineer, 1996 - 1999
  • Gemini Computers
    Software Engineer, 1993 - 1996
  • The Cato Institute
    Research Intern, 2007 - 2007
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Austin, TX
Previously
around - Edison, NJ - New Hartford, NY (upstate, kinda near Syracuse) - Diamond Bar, CA (near Orange County) - Sunnyvale, CA (near San Jose) - Austin, TX
Story
Tagline
I was born, grew up. / Lived a normal adult life, / And then I regressed.
Introduction
i was born, grew up.
lived a normal adult life...
and then I regressed
Bragging rights
my son is the cutest baby in the 'verse, and my wife is the hottest momma
Education
  • UC Berkeley
    B.S., Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, 1989 - 1993
  • San José State University
    M.A., Economics, 2006 - 2008
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
The apartment complex is a wonderful place to live. It's a somewhat rough neighborhood, but it's not that bad, really. We didn't run into or hear about any incidents, and also it was a big improvement from where we'd been living before, anyway. We lived here for a little over a year, from August of 2011 till November of 2012. New management had come in shortly before we moved in, so the other reviews here are probably not applicable anymore. The space we got was perfect for us. We'd just had a baby, and the kitchen and living room were very open. The vaulted ceilings were much higher than others I've seen. Plus, we got a nice spot near the smaller pool, which was well maintained and we used it (and the larger pool) very often. We didn't have to make repair requests often, and when we did they were resolved quickly. My only complaint is that the parking policy is extremely tight, which can make it difficult to entertain. I have no problem with requiring guest passes, but to require that they be returned is a bit much. Still, overall, this is a minor quibble compared to our overall experience. The staff is courteous, professional, and friendly, and they go out of their way to make this a family-friendly place, organizing community events like a Halloween party and having a movie night with a raffle. The only reason we moved out was that we could finally afford a house, and we've been wanting to garden and have a clothes-line and do other things that you can only do with a yard. All in all, this will be a place that we will look back to fondly. They've done a great job here.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Terrible. They prominently advertise a $19.99 rental fee, but this does not include a $10 insurance fee that CANNOT be waived and they won't let you rent unless you pay it. Even the scummy banks, when they charge fees, these are in the range of $2-$5. $10 is 50% of that price. You can't hide that in the print as "additional fees" unless you are terribly dishonest, immoral, and unethical.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
2 reviews
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