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Dael Morris
111 followers -
"carried to Ohio in a swarm of bees"
"carried to Ohio in a swarm of bees"

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So I was going to listen to this. It's Reza Aslan being interviewed about his book. I'm curious and I was doing a search, hence this link.

Before I did so, I started reading the transcript. The transcript turns out to be quite short and an easy read. Because I read the transcript, I didn't listen. I'm encouraging anyone to read the transcript. It'll give you an extraordinarily clear idea of how hard it must be for anyone advancing a non-traditional opinion in America. Despite the fact that I understand how the American echo chamber is created, I was still shocked and taken aback reading this.

Well worth it.

Once you've read it, and overcome the immediate urge to call him and apologise, if you're still interested in the subject you can read this article, which uses that interview as a departure point.

https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/08/the-book-that-changed-reza-aslans-mind-about-jesus/278410/

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and then, really, i remember this and i am reminded that it's actually all good, everywhere, despite me, because chaos is always personal and qualitative, not intrinsic. your evening, briefly; my worry and epiphany, briefly; and a short trip across Tom Waits's catalogue. 

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and the flip side is that my nostalgia is beginning to sound like this, or like some strange combination of this and Tim Fite's "Away From The Snakes".

Utopian, and unlikely, basically. 

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A lot of my day - both directly and through the news I'm exposed to - inclines me to see this as my soundtrack. It really is starting to feel like this. 

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And we'll keep reading and hearing that Mourinho "buys success".

Sure. 

Well done Chelsea. You beat a ten-man United one nil. Very impressive. 

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Amidst all the adulation for their "fighting spirit" and "brilliance", I'm glad to see that some people retain sanity. Barcelona cheated thoroughly, diving and faking their way through that second leg in a fashion not seen since Argentina was a football power. 

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Something I've been using as an axiom for a very long time, this time in Scientific American.

Basically, years back when studying biology, I came across the fact that ecologies become more or less robust (and resistant to invasive species) in dependence on the number and variety of their constituents. Mono-cultures are easily collapsed, basically. There are beautiful and fascinating reasons for this, but that can wait. I extended that principle to other domains as a heuristic, on the grounds that it was a systems-dynamics principle, not a biological principle per se. For example, there has only been one study ever on the notion of social "eccentricity". (Literally one. It's pretty interesting.) The results coming out of that study indicated that societies that tolerate a higher degree of deviation - eccentricity, basically - have other features, including in which are valuable assets like cohesion and robustness. If you apply that criterion to history, history looks wildly different and very interesting.

You can do quite insightful things with this heuristic - for example, I've also looked at conceptual mono-culture and worked out that, seen through this lens, the world we live in now is one of the most homogeneous communities ever to live on earth, and that, therefore, is one of the most at risk of collapse. I like this kind of lens, or blade, or whatever you want to call it. The kind you can apply to ostensibly intractable bodies of information, and - applied right - watch them collapse into discrete, harmonious assemblies of strange intelligibility.

Anyway. Scientific American catches up, basically.





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Just watched Kill Bill 1 again, and realised - for the first time -that it's an astonishingly good film, once you accept that he's trying to do each of the things that he does. There's literally only one place I think he misses a beat, and that's in the second round of the fight between the Crazy 88 and The Bride - after reinforcements arrive - where I think the fight would have been better scored to Malaguena Salerosa, a song used in the second film.

FYI, the song is a traditional mariachi song, performed by the director Robert Rodrigues' part-time band, Chingon, and sung by Alex Rodriguez. I accidentally started it while the scene was playing and was entranced.



Malaguena Salerosa [english Translation] lyrics


What pretty eyes you have,
Under those two eyebrows.
Under those two eyebrows,
What pretty eyes you have.

They want me to look
But if you don’t leave them
But if you don’t leave them
Not even to flash…

Rose leaves of Málaga
To kiss your wanted lips
To kiss your wanted lips
Rose leaves of Málaga
And telling you, beautiful girl…

That you are pretty and magical,
That you are pretty and magical,
As the innocence of a rose.

If in poverty you despise me,
I give you truth.
I give you truth,
If in poverty you despise me.

I do not offer you wealth (riches)
I offer you my heart.
I offer you my heart
In exchange for my poverty.

Rose leaves of Málaga
To kiss your wanted lips
To kiss your wanted lips
Rose leaves of Málaga
And telling you, beautiful girl…

That you are pretty and magical
That you are pretty and magical
As the innocence of a rose
And telling you, beautiful girl.

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This is Hamid - he took the photographs. (I know the man who knows the man :) ) They're very very beautiful and there's an extraordinarily good reason he went there to look in the first place, but you don't need to know that. Just enjoy. 
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