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Maria Donnelly
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284 followers
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Getting My Bees Ready To Winter
Busy as a bee This time of year, I see a lot of discussion about candy boards, sugar bricks, quilt boxes and wrapping hives. I also see a lot of questions along the lines of "When should I start getting my hive ready for winter?" For my location, the answer...

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A Few Good Queen Bees
You may be wondering how my May queens turned out. Here are a few pictures of those queens in their mating nucs just as they started laying. I ended up with 8 queen bees. One of them did not mate properly and turned into a drone layer. The rest of them succ...

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Queen Cells Are Capped And Ready to Go
Capped Queen Cells The queen cells are progressing nicely and got capped on Friday 5/27. Today, they are getting moved to the mating nucs. I made up the nucs yesterday, so they can be queenless for 24 hours and have better cell acceptance. In couple of week...

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What Is Going On In Maria's Apiary: Starting Queen Cells With the Cut Cell Method
Putting together the cell starter Queen cells candidates Cell bar ready to go The hives are building up nicely despite the chilly nights and constant rain. Most of the hives are filling out their first super. No signs of swarming so far except for one hive ...

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What Is Going On In Maria's Apiary: More Equalizing and Getting Ready for Splits
Bees are boiling over the sides while equalizing the brood The queen bee, doing her best to populate the brood nest As I mentioned last week, there are many ways to make sure that your honey bee hives are of the same strength. The easiest way is to switch t...

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Maria Donnelly commented on a post on Blogger.
Grace,
Depending on the time in the season you can just switch places of the weakest and strongest hives. The foragers are oriented to the location, so the stronger hive foragers are going to keep going to the same (old) location. If the smaller hive needs a bigger cluster, some of the foragers are going to revert to nursing duties as needed. This will allow the weaker hive to raise more brood due to the increased population. Also, the extra foragers will bring in more supplies. You will need to do this in the middle of the day while the foragers are flying.

A little bit further in the season (I am doing this this coming weekend, Apr 23), you can equalize the brood frames. This means you make sure every hive has the same amount of brood (open and capped). The trick here is not to move the queen while moving the nurse bees.

Maria

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