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Matthew Wilson
Lives in Seattle, WA
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Matthew Wilson

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I've played the teaser, and it's every bit as good as the original game. If you ever enjoyed Descent, you'll want to back this.
Experience the ultimate six-degree-of-freedom shooter from the people who invented the genre!
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Matthew Wilson

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Since Albert Einstein first predicted their existence a century ago, physicists have been on the hunt for gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime. That hunt is now over. Gravitational waves exist, and we’ve found them.
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Matthew Wilson

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Isn't he MAGNIFICENT?! (That is, in fact, his tongue sticking out.)
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Matthew Wilson

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Recently we've been having trouble with the wireless network at home. After a bit of investigating with tcpdump, nmap and whatnot I discovered that my Wink Hub has been sitting there on the network handing out bad addresses via DHCP. Turns out this is not an isolated incident.

I guess that I shouldn't be shocked as this is the same company that managed to push a software update that bricked 100% of their devices, requiring either sysadmin level skills to fix them or return shipping.

Wink customer support is going to get one hell of a call tomorrow morning.
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Marcus Wolschon's profile photo
 
Some people just want to see the world burn. ;)



(Or they simply had some customers left at the end of the year.)
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Matthew Wilson

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Oh yes, I'll be doing this project.  Though with modifications I'm sure.
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Radu - Eosif Mihailescu's profile photo
 
Awesome video, makes the lathe part look so simple (and I never really understood what the angle adjustment could be used for up to now :D ).

Must investigate doing this (building things or putting together videos like this ... or both) for a living :-)
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Matthew Wilson

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Ever wanted to make a difference in the world? Here's your chance.
 
After 9 years, I’m leaving Google. Today is my last day.

It’s hard to leave a place that you’ve been at for so long. People love to talk about the perks but really, it’s the people that have kept me at Google so long and it’s the people that I’m going to miss dearly.

So…if I'm going to miss it so bad, why in the world am I leaving?

My friend Roy Chan​ and I used to argue for hours about the role of idealists in the world. He’d try to convince me that change was driven by idealists and I’d tell him safe/sure paths were better…well today I’m going to admit defeat and make the choice of an idealist. I’m joining the US Digital Service working at Veterans Affairs in Seattle tackling electronic medical records.

Why? Because information technology is our generation’s steam engine…getting “digital services” right can make or break an organization (like our government). Because, momentum for change is building and we are at an inflection point for how government uses technology over the next decade. Because veterans and healthcare matter. Because if we citizens keep walking away from the hard problems, choosing instead to just criticize from a distance, things do not get better.

Is this going to be hard? Yes.
Will there be bureaucracy and all the other things that us techies hate? Absolutely.
Will there be legacy software to deal with? Like you couldn’t imagine.
Where is the hope then? The hope is in the people.

I’ve been working with USDS + various agencies intermittently for the last 1/2 year and can confidently say that despite the stereotypes + prejudice leveled against government workers, there are actually very good people in USDS (HQ, 18F, etc) as well as the rest of government. And when I say “very good,” I mean USDS has the highest concentration of talent + passion that I have ever had the pleasure of working with.

So with that, bye bye Google. Hello USDS and hello VA.  First target is a point-of-care web application built using a node.js stack. We’re looking for 5-7 people in Seattle. If you know anyone who has the skills and would find this intriguing, I’m interested in talking to them.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/digital/united-states-digital-service
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Matthew Wilson

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This.
 
After being asked personally a few times and reading claims by others a few more, I thought I'd set the record straight....

Working at Google does not give you access to the data of users!

It's an easy assumption to make.  After all, most companies don't put internal access controls on data making it easy for every employee to access everything inside the firewall.  Google does not work that way.

Though there are many groups at Google, we'll simplify it into Software Engineering ("SWE") and Site Reliability Engineering ("SRE").  I was the latter for 5 years and I've been the former for 3.

SWE, in general, has access to nothing.  They run their code on their own workstations and sometimes test clusters with test data.  A few get access to anonymized user data for their service -- more on that later.

SRE is the group that owns the keys to the kingdom.  They're the group (actually many small groups) responsible for running Google services "in production".  They almost always have access to anonymized user data for their service and the ability to access "raw" logs if necessary, again for only their service.  The kicker is that, since around 2011, this latter access comes through a specific interface where you must explain with each request why you're doing this.  All those actions are logged and those logs are audited.  Misuse of the access will get you fired.

What is "misuse"?  I can't even look up my own queries.  I could be on-call for my service, have you on the phone fixing a problem with you saying, "go ahead" , and I still couldn't do it.  In five years, I only used raw logs twice, both on myself during training just so we'd know how.

So, for any given service, there may be somewhere between 10 and 100 people worldwide who could potentially access Personally Identifiable Information ("PII") of a user, but doing so without a good reason would be the end of them at the company.  And should that abusive employee somehow cause "material damage" to the company...  I don't even want to speculate.

On top of that, any attempt to track a single user, whether the user can be identified personally or not, will also get you fired.  Every user with any form of logs access has signed a paper (real paper, even) stating that they understand all this and the consequences.

This is serious stuff.  My own team would turn me in without a second thought if I did any of this.  And I'd do the same to them.

What are "anonymized" logs?  They're the requests that have had all PII stripped.  No IP address.  No account identifier.  No geo-locating finer than the city, etc.

Disclaimer:  I work for Google (obviously).  These thoughts are mine and mine alone.  Mine, I tell you!  Mine!!!
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So the next question is, how do you get such a culture in the first place? (What went wrong with Uber?)
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Matthew Wilson

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TL;DR: Our experience with Tully Gehan’s FactoryForAll.com bordered on fraud and extortion and significantly impacted our ability to do business. We are sharing our experience here with others in the Maker community on the pitfalls of offshore sourcing. -- First of all, let me get this out of the way. We debated for a long time on whether to write this article. Business, by its very nature, involves risk. Bad things happen to...
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Matthew Wilson

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I've been playing with OnShape lately, and I have to say that I'm impressed. I designed a case for the Raspberry Pi that I can mount to my 3D printer. Definitely going to do more projects with it.

My case if you are interested: https://cad.onshape.com/documents/91b5d9667bf049bf8a342992/w/61fd522c83ad48be9a3bc04f/e/ce2b7bd4885d446386386b27
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Alena and I fired up the printer last night. She's interested in designing objects. Maybe she'll set up an account. :)
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Zero to "Shut up and take my money!" in 6 seconds!
A new deluxe edition of Kill Doctor Lucky, a classic board game from Cheapass Games.
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Rob Earhart's profile photoBri Hatch (daethnir)'s profile photoMatthew Wilson's profile photoChris Petersen's profile photo
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Looks fun.  Scarily enough, we've never played.
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Matthew Wilson

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This is going to be awesome.
Geek Chic is raising funds for Geek Chic XP on Kickstarter! A roving geek social club, creating community and experiences for all the entertainment, dining, play and relaxation you crave.
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Matthew Wilson

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Pre-ordered!
Meet OnHub, a new router from Google that’s built for all the ways you Wi-Fi.
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Lee Damon's profile photoTim Nguyen's profile photoGus Hartmann's profile photoMatthew Wilson's profile photo
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+Gus Hartmann yep!
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Have him in circles
547 people
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