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Jason Endacott
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Jason Endacott commented on a post on Blogger.
Thanks for the mention and for the link.  I was going to just let this entry pass without comment, but then I found myself actually losing sleep at the prospect that even one parent would read this and fall prey to the oversimplifications you make here.  So, here I am at 1:30 AM, posting on a blog so I can get back to sleep.
 
Unfortunately, both premises of this argument are false and fairly obviously so.
 
First, students do not spend 8-9 hours in testing every year.  They may spend 8-9 hours on PARCC testing, but the total number of DAYS spent on MAPS testing, AR testing, district benchmark testing… etc runs into the dozens.  And that doesn’t even count the amount of time spent prepping for tests instead of pursuing another more valuable educational pursuit.  Don’t take my word for it, ask a teacher.  Call one up right now and ask them about the 8-9 hours a year they spend testing.  But I’d hold the phone away from your ear after you ask.
 
Secondly, the PARCC exam has not been proven to be a valid and reliable measure of anything yet, and especially not the American Educational system.  In fact, the PARCC hasn’t even been proven valid and reliable for measuring progress on the CCSS, which in turn has not been field-tested either in order to see if they are valid or reliable.  The PARCC is an unproven test for an unproven set of standards.
 
Besides, the PARCC is not supposed to be a test of our educational system at all.  It is a test of achievement on a set of standards, with scores intended to provide summative feedback on any particular child’s progress towards that set of standards.  However, your post points out that many people are really looking forward to seeing how this unproven test of unproven standards can be used to "evaluate" an entire nation's educational system despite the fact that standardized tests have been proven to be a wholly inadequate measure for doing so.  That you have already co-opted the purpose of this test, which is presumably to measure students’ progress towards educational goals, for the purposes of generalized rhetoric regarding the status of our educational system, appears to place you firmly in that camp.
 
Off to bed.
 
Jason
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