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Trîndy Őakley
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Trîndy Őakley

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Whoop whoop!

Removing patent obstacles for electric vehicle development!
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Trîndy Őakley

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For my Master's degree, I worked on electric machines, and came into frequent contact (sometimes literally) with a lot of high voltage equipment. But only once did I accidentally set the lab on fire -- and it was with a little battery. Here's what happened: As I cleaned up my lab workspace one late night, I threw a nine volt battery casually into a box of junk under my workbench, which unbeknownst to me contained a piece of steel wool. Second later, I smelled smoke, and saw flames raging from said box. Fortunately, I caught it and extinguished it quickly. Here's a visual demonstration of what must have happened. Be careful out there!
Courtesy of imgur.  
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Trîndy Őakley

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+Tim McNamara +Liz Quilty

Will be great to get over to your side of the world for #LCA2015

*crosses fingers*
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:D
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Trîndy Őakley

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That is incredible! Will be interesting to see how much use he retains in his hand.

What a brilliant idea. Being an industrial accident I'm assuming that his arm would have sustained a great deal of damage (mashed), waiting until the tissue had recovered enough to reattach the hand is just... brilliant!

Well done China Doctors.
A man had his hand fixed to his ankle for a month before doctors successfully reattached it to his arm.
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Trîndy Őakley

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This!

Perhaps part of the reason I make a bad feminist.
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+Ralph Uy That and the shrunken penis are exactly what I meant. lol
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Trîndy Őakley

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This!
 
Fundraising for a Robotics kit

Most people know that I am keen to help females into Technology as much as possible. I would love to even up the numbers. I am not doing this at the expense of males in any way, and equally encourage anyone with a great interest.
My son is in the local robotics club, but due to restricted parts and budget, my daugher is unable to join. Several other females have shown interest in joining also, however due to not having enough parts, they are unable to.

The Robotics they use are the Vex ones, as these are the ones used by all other schools, and the only way we can compete with other schools, however they are a little expensive.

My goal is to raise the money for another 'Classroom and Competition Robotics Kit' plus a few other parts so they can make the best robotics they can. The cost of this kid is just  over $1200NZD plus the other parts so i have put my goal at $2000 

Whilst this is personal fund raising , all the proceeds will be going to the local high school robotics team to spend on the items

If you can help, and wish to help some females in technology, please donate something, it does not even have to be a huge amount, every little bit helps.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart

Liz

https://www.givealittle.co.nz/cause/CambridgeRobotics

ps. Sorry about notifications to those whom got it , i sent it thinking you may be interested
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Trîndy Őakley

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Well this is definitely green...
 
Wade Lind is a funeral director in Eugene, Oregon and he's come up with a new way to carry people to their final resting place with his tricycle hearse. Would you use this for the final ride in life? http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/david_sarasohn/index.ssf/2013/05/oregon_way_of_death_is_departi.html
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We went the cardboard route for my grandfather as well. Anything else for a cremation seem silly.
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Such an unexpected but wonderful historical record!
 
On The Shoulders of Giants

♀ A sepia print of an Indian woman, a Japanese woman and a woman from Syria, dated 1885. What do they have in common? Extraordinarily, each was the first licensed female medical doctor in their country of origin. They were trained at the Women's Medical College in Pennsylvania, the first of its kind in the country. This was a time before women had the right to vote. If they did attend college at all, it was at the risk of contracting "neuralgia, uterine disease, hysteria, and other derangements of the nervous system” (according to Harvard gynecologist Edward H. Clarke). 

An all-woman medical school was first proposed in 1846, supported by the Quakers and the feminist movement. Dr. Ellwood Harvey, one of the early teaching faculty, daringly smuggled out a slave, Ann Maria Weems, dressed as a male buggy driver, from right outside the White House. With his reward money, he bought his students a  papier maché dissection mannequin. Eventually, poverty forced him to quit teaching, but he still helped out with odd jobs. What a magnificent man!  

Fate and fortune were to buffet Ms. Joshi's life. Married at age 9 to a man 11 years older, her husband turned out to be surprisingly progressive. After she lost her first child at age 14, she vowed to render to her "poor suffering country women the true medical aid they so sadly stand in need of and which they would rather die than accept at the hands of a male physician". She was first offered a scholarship by a missionary on condition that she converted to Christianity. When she demurred, a wealthy socialite from New Jersey stepped in and financed her education. She is believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil. I didn't arrive until 1983 ;)

Times were tough then. The fate of these three intrepid pioneers was a sad one. Joshi died of tuberculosis in India at the age of 21, without ever practicing. Fittingly, her husband sent her ashes back to America. Islambouli was not heard of again, likely because she was never allowed to practice in her home country. Although Okami rose to the position of head of gynecology at a Tokyo hospital, she resigned two years later when the Emperor of Japan refused to meet her because she was a woman. 

Times have changed. My own mother was married at the age of 13 to a man also 11 years her senior. My father recalls helping my mother with her geography homework in high school. She never did attend college, despite being a charismatic woman with quicksilver wit and efficiency. Little wonder then, when I was accepted into graduate school in the US, unmarried and 21 years young, my parents staunchly stood behind me against the dire predictions of friends and relatives ("She'll come back with a yellow haired American!" "Haven't you read Cosmopolitan magazine? They are all perverts there!"). Happily, I escaped perversion, earned my doctoral degree and even gained a supportive spouse of my own. In 2004, I became only the 103rd woman to be promoted to Professor in the 111-year history of the Johns Hopkins medical school, and the first in my department, the oldest Physiology department in the country. If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants

#STEMwomen   #ScienceEveryday  

More reading: http://www.pri.org/stories/2013-07-15/historical-photos-circulating-depict-women-medical-pioneers
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Well it really has been a while since I've truly visited G+.... May since the last web login and June a few times for a quick boredom fix via the mobile.

Really dislike the mobile app... for various reasons... but I really do miss the content and the people here.  Need to squeeze more recreational hours into the day.

So just dropping by to say... MISS YOU GUYS!!!

Oh and Linux Conf Au early bird tickets are available!  *squee*  #LCA2014
linux.conf.au 2014
Perth, Western Australia
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Are you going ?
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Trîndy Őakley

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New Hair as of the 23rd August... Starting to move away from the super dark colour I've had for the last 12 years and blending the colour out to a mid red/brown/auburn colour.

Adore my new hairdresser - Lauren at Gosh Hair Salon in Mt Waverley... She actually knows how to cut curly hair and was able to give me exactly what I asked for.

Their dyes and products are divine and lean towards more natural ingredients and plant extracts.  Can't recommend De Lorenzo products enough, my hair is so healthy and shiny and gorgeous!

</narcissistic post>

http://goshhair.com.au/ )
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Hubba hubba
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Trîndy Őakley

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A rather detailed story of the unrest in Istanbul. All the Why, When, Where, Whats and Hows...

Makes me really appreciate my life and country.
 
News from Turkey, from my friend Bahar Sayan
#Turkey #turkeyprotests #OccupyGezi #solidarity  

This is a summary of the events in Turkey, and the underlying reasons as to why so many peaceful people have decided to take action, in case anyone wonders. The information on the media is somehow lacking and at times, biased.

The trigger
What started as a peaceful protest against the building of a shopping mall (in the form of an Ottoman-era military barrack demolished almost a century ago) in Gezi Park the last piece of green area in the center of Istanbul turned into a city-wide protest against the Islamist AKP government which has been in power for a decade now. Protests have been mildly going on for over a year against the demolishing of Gezi Park. When the construction workers started to destroy the trees four days ago, protesters started to camp at the Park to prevent further damage. The protesting group has no affiliation with any known political or environmental group and consisted of people from different walks of life and beliefs and included several members of the parliament, artists/actors etc. The police tried to disperse the peaceful group with tear gas/pepper gas to no avail. Later Friday evening, a court order was issued for stay of order concerning the building of the shopping mall a mild attempt to appease the protesters but the police force was not backed.

Escalation of the protests
A few days ago, the PM Tayyip Erdogan made a statement that they would build the barrack "no matter what people said". Things started to escalate when the police made an early morning raid on Friday, 31 May at 5 am burning down the tents and gassing the people away. Enraged by the police violence against a totally peaceful protest (protesters had no guns, tools etc to attack) trying to protect the park, the event started to turn into a city-wide clash with more people joining from all parts of the city and the police using excessive force against them. People around the Taksim district (the center of the city, a touristic destination and also where the park is located) and the adjoining pedestrian Istiklal Street were gas-bombed and water cannoned. The 4-thousand people group turned into tens of thousands in a few hours and protests started in major cities like Ankara, Izmir, Eskisehir as well as many others. The police forces tried to prevent people from supporting Istanbul from other cities and those in Istanbul trying to reach Taksim. Gas bombs were carelessly used in the subway to stop people from getting out to Taksim not discriminating whether there are minors, passers-by and elders.

The background
It is obvious that tens of thousands in a city (even the country) would not riot against the government for a single park. The AKP (ruling party) came into power over a decade ago promising justice (the party's name translates as Justice and Development Party) for everyone and created a false hope for Turkey where human rights violations have been an ongoing issue for decades. The AKP was supported by foreign countries as well as Turkey's mostly Islamic-rooted population. However the promise of democracy (about which they said "democracy is a train and they could get off at whatever stop they wished") and freedom transformed into a counterattack against the secularist state and its supporters. Education system was changed to benefit Islamic schools; the entire media was suppressed (for example there is no coverage on TVs and newspapers about these events except a few minor ones); hundreds of journalists, intellectuals, writers, musicians have been arrested on grounds of plotting against the government, while they were simply exercising their freedom of speech; the ever-powerful military was suppressed arresting tens of generals and officers with no apparent proof; the justice system was overtaken by the AKP-supporting people who would act with super powers in favor of the government; immunity for politicians was not lifted as AKP promised before coming into power and on the contrary AKP's and personally the PM Tayyip Erdogan's supporters have seized the opportunity to become incredibly rich and powerful with laws put into immediate effect by the government to benefit them and the list goes on. The country which had been undergoing continuous economic struggle for decades saw a false hope of stability in AKP's single-party power which was also shared globally by other governments and endured the negative effects of the government's policies until now.

Why Now?
While AKP and Erdogan have become more powerful during years, the secular nation started to become aware of the importance of their and the coming generations' freedom over economy; have seen that the government would in no manner refrain from exerting oppression and violence against its people to protect its own interests. The people of a "secular" republic, which had been secured by the loss of countless lives in the Independence War, objected to the reign of a dictator under the guise of an elected PM.

Swashed with agitated political differences since the proclamation of the republican state, people of Turkey (which is composed of different ethnic minorities such as Kurds, Armenians, Turkish Greeks, Circassians, Laz people and religions/sects such as the Sunnis, Alevites, Jews, Catholics, Orthodox, Yazidis) have never found a cause to act in unison historically since the Independence War. Now people of Turkey have realized that they would be more powerful in securing their freedom and democracy when they are together, not against each other after almost a century has passed. This makes it all the more important and an exemplary moment in the country's history.

Reports from Friday and Saturday
The police have been ceaselessly gassing and water-cannoning their own people since Friday afternoon. Contrary to official counts in the Turkish and international media, not "12" but hundreds of people have been seriously wounded by the attacks as a result of excessive use of gas bombs which were even directly aimed at people's bodies. Two are dead, many have been brutally beaten. The police even gas bombed people at the Taksim Hospital's Emergency Entrance. Not knowing where to find security and rescue, people rushed around to evade police brutality and late in the night, some hotels (even a few luxury ones), some leading private high schools, the military's guest house in the Taksim district opened their doors to the wounded. They were joined by NGOs, cafes, pharmacies, voluntary doctors, lawyers. An unknown number of people (full of many buses) have been detained. Public transportation was halted to prevent people from coming to Taksim for support. 3G access has been prevented; many cafes and people are sharing their Wi-Fi freely with the streets. Istanbulites who are not on the streets, support the protest from their homes banging on cans, drums, clapping hands; whistling and booing the government. As reported on Facebook and Twitter, some policemen have resigned their posts claiming they can not bear this anymore and some are seen to throw away their gas masks and join the protesters. In Izmir, the police applauded the people and backed off (from Facebook).

PM Erdogan issued a statement today, June 1 saying that they would not back off from building the mall and they would also demolish the Ataturk Cultural Center, the city's only opera house which has been idle for many years on grounds of restoration which never started, to build a grander one. However, everyone would remember their wish to build a mosque in its place many years ago. He also added that the Ministry of Interior Affairs would investigate excessive use of pepper and tear gas by the police forces as if they acted on their own. Undercover police members are seen to demolish ATMs and set fires in Taksim to support the government allegations that protesters are destroying peace. Forces have started to use a different chemical gas (Orange Gas) in addition to pepper and tear gas.

Right now at 6 pm Saturday, people are rushing from everywhere in thousands and have taken over Taksim Square. People rest and rush out again. There is no official account of the protests in the media. The only up-to-date source about what's going on is social media (Facebook, Twitter and some newly appearing blogs and sites).

This is not a street riot, it is people rising for their hardly earned rights and their beautiful country.

Please read and share.
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I find this all a worry. ..

Did some travel 1.5-2 years ago around Jordan, Egypt (not long after the peak of the "Arab Spring", and departed Egypt the day trial of Hosni Mubarak started), and Turkey.
Turkey was my favourite, and I'd love to return before too long. Istanbul is breathtaking, and the carnival atmosphere of Ramazan is something to experience.

A mate who was born in Turkey gave a a bunch of tips on what to see/do, and his advice was invaluable. He tries to return every few years, and I just missed-out on tagging-along with him a couple of months ago. He's startled at how much things have changed in Turkey over the last 10 years.

Laws and civil rights have become more conservative and less secular; suburbs of Istanbul are being demolished in the name of "urban renewal" but it's really ethnic cleansing; the history and culture of the place are being destroyed at a faster pace than any other time in history (and they know a thing or two about that).

This violence and corruption has to stop. The police are gassing, shooting, and even killing peaceful protesters in the street. For the last decade Turkey has had practically the highest rate of locking-up journalists in the world [NB: I heard this but haven't verified]. They regularly lock-up political opponents, whether they're parliamentarians or protesters. Any media they don't already own, they have intimidated into silence or shut-down, and that includes access Twitter and Facebook recently. 

Erdogan has been in power too long, and has gone way too far this time. Erdogan  has to go!
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Burmese owned, Pseudo-Geek and lover of all things PURPLE.
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