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Tomo Owa
Worked at Junior College
Attended Nagoya University
Lived in Nagano
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Tomo Owa

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Jobs of the future by CST (Canadian Scholarship Trust Foundation)

Future jobs I take interest in are "Localizer," "Robot counseler," and "Healthcare navigator."
  
About inspired minds careers 2030:
Inspired Minds is CST’s newest initiative to help guide Canada’s education and professional pathways into the future.

Source:
http://careers2030.cst.org/jobs/

Wired.it:
http://www.wired.it/economia/lavoro/2015/03/02/professioni-futuro-nel-2030-farai-carriera-cosi/
Wired.jp:日本語
http://wired.jp/2015/03/25/2030-works/
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‘Smart bandage’ detects bedsores before they are visible to doctors
床ずれ検出センサーを開発 by UC Berkeley
#medicine   #engineering  
https://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2015/03/17/smart-bandages-detect-bedsores/
UC Berkeley researchers have created a new "smart bandage" that uses electrical currents to detect early tissue damage from pressure ulcers, or bedsores, before they can be seen by human eyes — and while recovery is still possible.
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Chameleons. 
 
NEW VIDEO! How do chameleons change color? A new study finds an ingenious mechanism involving nanoscale crystals
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The science of protecting people’s feelings: why we pretend all opinions are equal

"equality bias"
 
"an important successor to the Dunning-Kruger paper has just been come out — and it, too, is pretty depressing (at least for those of us who believe that domain expertise is a thing to be respected and, indeed, treasured). This time around, psychologists have not uncovered an endless spiral of incompetence and the inability to perceive it. Rather, they’ve shown that people have an “equality bias” when it comes to competence or expertise, such that even when it’s very clear that one person in a group is more skilled, expert, or competent (and the other less), they are nonetheless inclined to seek out a middle ground in determining how correct different viewpoints are."

"Yes, that’s right — we’re all right, nobody’s wrong, and nobody gets hurt feelings."
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Prof Burke explains the process in this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_0wC5kDN3s  
 
Molecule Building Machine

A couple of weeks ago I posted about one of the largest machines in the world, that big GE Gas Turbine.  Today I am at the other end of the scale, a machine that can build molecules.  

Martin Burke, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist, has lead a research team at University of Illinois in constructing a machine that takes tiny molecular bits and assembles them into small complex molecules, with a push of a button or the click of a mouse.

Chemists at the University of Illinois, led by chemistry professor and medical doctor Martin D. Burke, built the machine to assemble complex small molecules at the click of a mouse, like a 3-D printer at the molecular level. The automated process has the potential to greatly speed up and enable new drug development and other technologies that rely on small molecules.  ⓐ

“We wanted to take a very complex process, chemical synthesis, and make it simple,” said Burke, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist. “Simplicity enables automation, which, in turn, can broadly enable discovery and bring the substantial power of making molecules to nonspecialists.”   ⓐ

“Small molecules” are a specific class of complex, compact chemical structures found throughout nature. They are very important in medicine – most medications available now are small molecules – as well as in biology as probes to uncover the inner workings of cells and tissues. Small molecules also are key elements in technologies like solar cells and LEDs.  ⓐ

However, small molecules are notoriously difficult to make in a lab. Traditionally, a highly trained chemist spends years trying to figure out how to make each one before its function can even be explored, a slowdown that hinders development of small-molecule-based medications and technologies.  ⓐ

A large impetus for Burke and his team's work was solving this bottleneck. To do this, they looked at what the major impediments were to the complex molecule creation process and realized that they needed to take a very complex process and simplify it.  ⓑ

The researchers started with the basics by breaking down the construction of complex molecules into even smaller constituent elements that could then be more easily assembled. As these elements all possess the same interconnecting chemical connectors, these simple structures could then all be relatively simply joined back together using a single reaction.  ⓑ

The team has compared this process with the method of joining interconnecting plastic blocks that children play with: they may all be different shapes and sizes, but they have a common connecting system that allows them all to be easily and securely snapped together. These aren't esoteric, expensive, difficult to obtain chemical building blocks, but, according to the team, many of them are available commercially, straight off the shelf.  ⓑ

The nuts and bolts of this system of complex molecule assembly relies on an automated "catch-and-release" method that the researchers devised. In this method, the system joins each building block one at a time, then washes away the excess chemicals used in the process before moving on to add the next one in the sequence.  ⓑ

This can be compared to using Lego plastic blocks to build complex structures by the use of a “common connecting system”.

The researchers report that they have been able to show that their device can build 14 separate classes of small complex molecules, which also included those composed of especially difficult to make ring-type structures, all in the same automated process.  ⓑ

"Dr. Burke’s research has yielded a significant advance that helps make complex small molecule synthesis more efficient, flexible and accessible," said Miles Fabian of the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences, which partially funded the research. "It is exciting to think about the impact that continued advances in these directions will have on synthetic chemistry and life science research.”  ⓑ


ⓐ News Bureau University of Illinois, press release.
Molecule-making machine simplifies complex chemistry
http://news.illinois.edu/news/15/0312molecule_machine_MartyBurke.html

ⓑ Gizmag
Machine automatically assembles complex molecules at the microscopic level
http://www.gizmag.com/complex-molecule-automated-machine/36527/

ⓒ Science, March 13, 2015 (paywall)
Synthesis of many different types of organic small molecules using one automated process
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6227/1221

Image:
Researchers at the University of Illinois claim to have created a machine that assembles a range of complex molecules at the push of a button (Photo: L. Brian Stauffer)
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It is I who should thank you, +Gary Ray R  for interesting posts.
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【東京大空襲から70年】
ヤフーでは特集「1945.3.10 空襲の記憶~あの日から70年~」を開始しました。当時の暮らし、被災状況、証言で振り返ります。「空襲の記憶」を後世にどう伝えていくか考えるきっかけにしていただければと思います。 http://yahoo.jp/Nk8FkG
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Tomo Owa

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Festo made FlexShapeGripper – gripping modelled on a chameleon’s tongue

http://www.festo.com/cms/en_corp/14254.htm
https://youtu.be/m7l-87r4oOY
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Geckos found to have skin mechanism that flings off water (w/ video) http://ow.ly/2VUm1k
A small team of researchers with members from institutions in Australia and the U.K. has found that in addition to being able to walk on walls, at last one type of gecko has a skin feature that causes water to be thrown off its body. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, ...
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For people who are interested in tertiary education.
 
My first reaction was (again) irritation at the waste of women in Japan, but it's more than that. Yes, it's true that Japanese women lag behind (postgraduate studies, management, politics, ad nauseum), but this PhD problem extends to men, too. Why so low in Japan? 

1) Fewer students require fewer academic staff.
2) Japanese companies want inexperienced youngsters who can be moulded into cookie-cutter employees.

More from nature.com below:

Japan: A system in crisis

Of all the countries in which to graduate with a science PhD, Japan is arguably one of the worst. In the 1990s, the government set a policy to triple the number of postdocs to 10,000, and stepped up PhD recruitment to meet that goal. The policy was meant to bring Japan's science capacity up to match that of the West — but is now much criticized because, although it quickly succeeded, it gave little thought to where all those postdocs were going to end up.

Academia doesn't want them: the number of 18-year-olds entering higher education has been dropping, so universities don't need the staff. Neither does Japanese industry, which has traditionally preferred young, fresh bachelor's graduates who can be trained on the job. The science and education ministry couldn't even sell them off when, in 2009, it started offering companies around ¥4 million (US$47,000) each to take on some of the country's 18,000 unemployed postdoctoral students (one of several initiatives that have been introduced to improve the situation). "It's just hard to find a match" between postdoc and company, says Koichi Kitazawa, the head of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

This means there are few jobs for the current crop of PhDs. Of the 1,350 people awarded doctorates in natural sciences in 2010, just over half (746) had full-time posts lined up by the time they graduated. But only 162 were in the academic sciences or technological services,; of the rest, 250 took industry positions, 256 went into education and 38 got government jobs.

http://www.nature.com/news/2011/110420/full/472276a.html

PS from Ru: Japan's tertiary education system is ... not ideal. (I can be remarkably restrained when I'm in the mood.) The country has good universities, but apart from Todai they simply don't/can't compete on the global stage. It's enough to make a strong woman cry. 

Source of graph:
http://oecdeducationtoday.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/doctorate-degree-holders-take-research.html?m=1
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Shape Shifting Liquid Metal Moves by Using Aluminum Fuel

While not quite Terminator T-1000, this is an fascinating advancement in the research of liquid metals.   Scientists at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China have been studying gallium.  

Gallium is a chemical element with symbol Ga and atomic number 31. Elemental gallium does not occur in free form in nature, but as the gallium(III) compounds that are in trace amounts in zinc ores and in bauxite. Gallium is a soft, silvery metal, and elemental gallium is a brittle solid at low temperatures, and melts at 29.76 °C (85.57 °F) (slightly above room temperature).   Wiki [Gallium]

As part of an effort to better understand the properties of liquid metals, the researchers were working with gallium—after adding a little bit of indium and tin they discovered that if a bit of aluminum was affixed to a single drop of the alloy (to serve as fuel) and the result was dropped into a container of sodium hydroxide (or even salt water) the drop would propel itself around the container for approximately one hour. In subsequent tests they found that if the container was shaped with channels, the drop could be made to follow a pre-designated path. What's more, they noted that if the drop encountered a part of the channel that was slimmer than it was, it could squeeze through.  ⓑ

"The soft machine looks rather intelligent and [can] deform itself according to the space it voyages in, just like [the] Terminator does from the science-fiction film," says Jing Liu from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.  ⓐ

The next step was to determine what enabled the drop to move. 
Surprised by the movement of the drop, the researchers took a closer look—analysis revealed that when the drop was placed in the solution, a charge imbalance occurred between the front and back of the drop, causing a pressure differential. They also found that as the aluminum reacted with the saltwater, tiny bubbles were formed which also served to push the drop forward (so long as the aluminum bit was on the back end.)  ⓑ

The experiments by the team build on prior work by them and others (as part of an effort to make "soft" robots) that showed that with some liquid metals, an electric charge can cause both an expansion and change of shape to a drop. The researchers note that if both techniques were used, the result could be drops that not only move themselves through liquids, but change shape according to predetermined needs. They suggest their findings could conceivably pave the way for drops that are used to deliver materials via pipes or even through blood vessels.  ⓑ

Other researchers have shown that a stationary gallium drop can act as a pump when in an electric field. Liu followed up this idea and showed that if their self-powered motor is held still, it too becomes a pump, shifting about 50 milliliters of water every second. "It's the first ever self-powered pump," he says. The team says that could have immediate applications for moving liquid through a cooling device without the need for an external power source.  ⓐ

Abstract from paper in Advanced Materials (paywall)
A liquid metal motor that can “eat” aluminum food and then move spontaneously and swiftly in various solution configurations and structured channels for more than 1 h is discovered. Such biomimetic mollusk is highly shape self-adaptive by closely conforming to the geometrical space it voyages in. The first ever self-fueled pump is illustrated as one of its typical practical utilizations.  ⓒ

Earlier research on a liquid metal pump are available open access.  ⓓ


ⓐ New Scientist
Liquid metal brings shape-shifting robot a step closer
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27127-liquid-metal-brings-shapeshifting-robot-a-step-closer.html#.VQB1bFPF_wU

ⓑ Phys.org
Shape shifting liquid metal able to propel itself through liquids (w/ video)
http://phys.org/news/2015-03-shifting-liquid-metal-propel-liquids.html

ⓒ Advanced Materials (paywall)
Self-Fueled Biomimetic Liquid Metal Mollusk
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.201405438/abstract;jsessionid=950A508ED4E8DF50A9ACF89D1C65C63A.f03t02

ⓓ PNAS January 2014
Liquid metal enabled pump
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/9/3304.full.pdf+html

Image: Tsinghua University
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Thank you, Karen. I am glad that you who are not an engineer or a physicist said so.
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Hybrid nanowires eyed for computers, flexible displays

A new process for coating copper nanowires with graphene - an ultrathin layer of carbon – lowers resistance and heating, suggesting potential applications in computer chips and flexible displays.

Now, researchers have developed a technique for encapsulating the wires with graphene and have shown that the hybrid wires are capable of 15 percent faster data transmission while lowering peak temperature by 27 percent compared with uncoated copper nanowires.

Until now it has been difficult to coat copper nanowires with graphene because the process requires chemical vapor deposition at temperatures of about 1,000 degrees Celsius, which degrades copper thin films and small-dimension wires. The researchers have developed a new process that can be performed at about 650 degrees Celsius, preserving the small wires intact, using a procedure called plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

Source:
http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2015/Q1/hybrid-nanowires-eyed-for-computers,-flexible-displays.html

Paper:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl504889t
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Interesting research, I didn't know that tiny copper wires and films lose conductivity due to surface effects from oxidation. And the that a layer of graphene would prevent the formation of that oxide and increase the thermal conductivity too.

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Last week German Chancellor Angela Merkel hosted visiting Chinese President Xi Jinping at a dinner where they exchanged gifts.
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Education
  • Nagoya University
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Male
Other names
Formerly, Tsuchiya
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Introduction
こんにちは。 Hello.  ¡hola.  Guten Tag.
I am a teaching staff and researcher with a junior college in a small city in Japan.

Specialty: Materials Processing and Metals Engineering

Perhaps I'm serious !? person with business.

Recent interest in:
- Materials science
- College education and primary education
- College Management
- Entrepreneurship   
- Eco-friendly technology (energy harvesting, green factory etc)
- ICT (Information and communications technology)
- Your culture and cultural background
- In the nature of things, beauty

It is good to learn various views and tips from you.  

(If you would have your profile veiled, I may not to be able to add you.)
Bragging rights
Survived Juken senso (受験戦争, fiercely competitive entrance examinations)!?
Work
Occupation
Engineer, Associate Professor
Employment
  • Junior College
    2012
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Previously
Nagano - Nagoya
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