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Sean O'Neil
Works at Duo Security
Attended University of Michigan
Lived in Frankfurt
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Sean O'Neil

Retrofit  - 
 
I'm currently using Retrofit with an API that has a hostname with the format 'api-{code}.foobar.com' where 'code' is retrieved after activating an account with foobar.com. If there are multiple accounts, should I be creating separate RestAdapters for each base URL? Ideally I would like to have one RestAdapter with one implementation of my API interface that supports different base URLs.
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Adrian Cole's profile photoJake Wharton's profile photoAustyn Mahoney's profile photoSean O'Neil's profile photo
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I must have been using my modified fork at the time. You guys are correct.
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Sean O'Neil

Discussion  - 
 
How does Square approach persisting data to disk in their apps? I vaguely remember a talk where Eric Burke said SQLite is generally avoided at Square.
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Jake Wharton's profile photoOri Peleg's profile photoSean O'Neil's profile photoPatrick Forhan's profile photo
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+Sean O'Neil Yes. That's usually a reasonable approach if you don't need querying. File systems, by nature, are a hierarchical key/value store that can and should be exploited.
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Sean O'Neil

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haha this is true. I became emotionally invested in There Will Be Blood and lost track of time
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Sean O'Neil

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Vic Gundotra originally shared:
 
Icon Ambulance

One Sunday morning, January 6th, 2008 I was attending religious services when my cell phone vibrated. As discreetly as possible, I checked the phone and noticed that my phone said "Caller ID unknown". I choose to ignore.

After services, as I was walking to my car with my family, I checked my cell phone messages. The message left was from Steve Jobs. "Vic, can you call me at home? I have something urgent to discuss" it said.

Before I even reached my car, I called Steve Jobs back. I was responsible for all mobile applications at Google, and in that role, had regular dealings with Steve. It was one of the perks of the job.

"Hey Steve - this is Vic", I said. "I'm sorry I didn't answer your call earlier. I was in religious services, and the caller ID said unknown, so I didn't pick up".

Steve laughed. He said, "Vic, unless the Caller ID said 'GOD', you should never pick up during services".

I laughed nervously. After all, while it was customary for Steve to call during the week upset about something, it was unusual for him to call me on Sunday and ask me to call his home. I wondered what was so important?

"So Vic, we have an urgent issue, one that I need addressed right away. I've already assigned someone from my team to help you, and I hope you can fix this tomorrow" said Steve.

"I've been looking at the Google logo on the iPhone and I'm not happy with the icon. The second O in Google doesn't have the right yellow gradient. It's just wrong and I'm going to have Greg fix it tomorrow. Is that okay with you?"

Of course this was okay with me. A few minutes later on that Sunday I received an email from Steve with the subject "Icon Ambulance". The email directed me to work with Greg Christie to fix the icon.

Since I was 11 years old and fell in love with an Apple II, I have dozens of stories to tell about Apple products. They have been a part of my life for decades. Even when I worked for 15 years for Bill Gates at Microsoft, I had a huge admiration for Steve and what Apple had produced.

But in the end, when I think about leadership, passion and attention to detail, I think back to the call I received from Steve Jobs on a Sunday morning in January. It was a lesson I'll never forget. CEOs should care about details. Even shades of yellow. On a Sunday.

To one of the greatest leaders I've ever met, my prayers and hopes are with you Steve.

-Vic
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I was getting really sick of the Advice Dog related memes, but this one looks really good.
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Sean O'Neil

Discussion  - 
 
I've been using +Jake Wharton's new Gradle test plugin for the past couple days and have encountered almost zero issues until I threw in the SecureRandom PRNG seeding patch that Google released last week. I'm getting a ClassNotFoundException for org.apache.harmony.xnet.provider.jsse.NativeCrypto. Has anyone else encountered this? 
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#io2012

Will this app be open sourced as well?
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I'm not a dev, sorry for the misunderstanding :-) just a happy user
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I personally don't think Google's leaders are right in abandoning Reader, but then again I am completely and utterly biased in my undying love for seeing that unread count skyrocket in the morning.
Chris Wetherell originally shared:
 
There’s been some interesting critical discussions of some design and product changes within Google Reader recently and I’ve kind of stayed out of it since I’m heads down on making big changes elsewhere. But I grabbed a few minutes, and I’d like to share a few notes I’ve written about it…

• If Reader continues being understaffed, absorbed, or is eliminated then the internal culture at Google will adjust to a newly perceived lack of opportunity for building things that are treasured. No one knows what effect this will actually have, though. The response could be tiny.

• Technology will route around the diminishment or disappearance of Reader. Even if this means something other than feeds are being used.

It’s a tough call. Google’s leaders may be right to weaken or abandon Reader. I feel more people should acknowledge this.

• However, saying “no” to projects doesn’t make you Steve Jobs if you say no to inspiring things. It’s the discernment that’s meaningful, not the refusal. Anyone can point their thumb to the ground.

• The shareable social object of subscribe-able items makes Reader’s network unique and the answer to why change is painful for many of its users is because no obvious alternative network exists with exactly that object. The social object of Google+ is…nearly anything and its diffuse model is harder to evaluate or appreciate. The value of a social network seems to map proportionally to the perceived value of its main object. (Examples: sharing best-of-web links on Metafilter or sharing hi-res photos on Flickr or sharing video art on Vimeo or sharing statuses on Twitter/Facebook or sharing questions on Quora.) If you want a community with stronger ties, provide more definition to your social object.

Reader exhibits the best unpaid representation I’ve yet seen of a consumer’s relationship to a content producer. You pay for HBO? That’s a strong signal. Consuming free stuff? Reader’s model was a dream. Even better than Netflix. You get affinity (which has clear monetary value) for free, and a tracked pattern of behavior for the act of iterating over differently sourced items – and a mechanism for distributing that quickly to an ostensible audience which didn’t include social guilt or gameification – along with an extensible, scalable platform available via commonly used web technologies – all of which would be an amazing opportunity for the right product visionary.

• Reader is (was?) for information junkies; not just tech nerds. This market totally exists and is weirdly under-served (and is possibly affluent).

• The language for decisions based on deferred value is all about sight, which I find beautiful (and apt for these discussions). People are asking if Google is seeing the forest for the trees. I’d offer that Google is viewing this particular act-of-seeing as a distraction.

• Reader will be an interesting footnote in tech history. That’s neat and that’s enough for me; wasn’t it fun that we were able to test if it worked?

• Google is choosing to define itself by making excellent products in obvious markets that serve hundreds of millions of people. This is good. A great company with evident self-consciousness that even attempts to consider ethical consequences at that scale is awesome. But this is a perfect way to avoid the risk of creating entirely new markets which often go through a painful not-yet-serving-hundreds-of-millions period and which require a dream, some dreamers, and not-at-all-measurable luck. Seemingly Google+ could be viewed as starting a new market, but I'd argue that it mainly stands a chance of improving on the value unlocked by other social networks, which is healthy and a good thing, but which doesn't require an investigation into why it's valuable. That's self-evident in a Facebook world. Things like Reader still need a business wizard to help make sense of the value there.

• If Google is planning on deprecating Reader then its leaders are deliberately choosing to not defend decisions that fans or users will find indefensible. This would say a lot about how they would communicate to the marketplace for social apps and about how they'd be leading their workforce. If this is actually occurring and you’re internal to Google – it's ok, I can imagine you’d be feeling that these decisions are being made obtusely “just because” or since “we need to limit our scope to whatever we can cognitively or technically handle” or such but I’d offer that maybe it's needed for driving focus for a large team? I suppose sacrificing pet projects, public responsibility, and transparency could be worth it if the end is a remarkable dream fulfilled. But what if the thing you’re driving everyone toward isn’t the iPod but is instead the Zune? So just make sure it's not that.

• The following sentence is unfair but it's a kind of myth and fog that has been drifting into view about 'em: Google seems to be choosing efforts like SketchUp over Reader. I doubt there's a common calculus, but it’s now harder for Google's users to really know how important it is that many millions of people are using a product every day when Google is deciding its evolution and fate.
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Sean O'Neil

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food's still good though. The lobster tempura are awesome.
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    Software Engineer, 2012 - present
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    Computer Science Engineering, 2008 - 2012
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