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Neally Law, LLC
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Sailing masters, the Captains of the ship, they give the ship its direction.  The mission, the pace, and the ethos of the ship and its crew are all provided by the Captain.  The Captain has an immense amount of knowledge and experience on how to sail from coast to coast, to take advantage of the ocean currents and winds.  But, that same master of the ship cannot know every port, every narrow waterway, thence one of the oldest professions, the Maritime Pilot.  The Pilot profession is first known to exist in the 7th Century BC and continues to this day.  A Pilot's role is to guide the ship through the shallows, the reefs, and the complicated currents that may exist in a harbor. The dangers and the knowledge is so specific that a Captain cannot know each port so well to perfectly navigate the ship safely through to the dock. 
Neally Law has taken a lesson from this practice.  Whether, a Captain of the ship or a Captain of industry, whether a chief of the boat or a director at a small or medium business, all of your time and effort must be focused on the best manner of accomplishing your mission.  Both ships and companies need great leaders, and a great leader knows when to rely on the expertise of others who have the knowledge and experience to pilot the ship through dangerous waters, either metaphorically or literally. The Pilot needs to know the ship and the harbor.  It does the Captain little good, to hire a pilot who knows where the reefs are located, or the currents, but does not have experience in maneuvering a ship, or how the currents can pull a certain type of vessel more than others.  As in sailing, it does a business leader little good to hire an attorney who just knows the law and knows little about how to run a business or how the law effects certain business models. 
Neally Law knows business and law.  For business, a good attorney is not just going to help you have your day in court, but will guide you forward to your goal, and demonstrate how you can protect the equity you rely on to catapult you forward.  Most of all, business leaders need an attorney who will be there with you supporting your mission and advising success.  Neally Law, guiding great businesses forward.
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NEALLY LAW
 Our Service to Meet Your Goals
 The Present:
 The attorney/client paradigm has not changed much since the beginning of the profession. The client has a transaction or a dispute where legal assistance is required. The client talks to a friend or seeks out an attorney and finds Doe and Doe Law Firm. The client sets an appointment and during the consultation, attempts to summarize a complex problem, details of the problem, and the client’s goals. An attorney then comes up with a solution or plan which has been tried and true with many other clients and the relationship proceeds where each minute the attorney works with the client or researches for the client is billed to the client. The attorney thinks of a new strategy, then bills the client for the research on the new strategy.
 The Present Incentives: This plan is designed to get the maximum amount of money for the attorney, but does not lead to the best service. The best solution is in the incentives. If an attorney bills per hour, what is the incentive? The incentive, frankly, is for the attorney to work as many hours for which the client would be willing to pay. All of those hours can easily be construed as representing the client to the best of the attorney’s ability, and no ethical obligation would be breached. As long as the attorney is legitimately working for that client and the direct objective for the attorney is not to bill more the underlying incentive can easily manipulate the attorney to work. But, even with ethical obligations met, the incentive is to get the client to pay more.
 The Present Service: There is another problem with this paradigm, the time and effort it takes to get the attorney up to speed on understanding the problem, the client’s goals, the client’s business, the evidence, etc. In many cases if the issue is a dispute, all of the evidence in the case has already been established. Thus, the attorney is not helping to navigate to reach a goal, but to explain and argue to a judge or jury that what has happened should get the client to the goal.
 A true tale: A business owner rented the basement of a building, with a gas station above. The gas station had a large cooler section that sometime after the business moved in and set up computer workstations, the coolers began to leak onto the desks below, and occasionally water would collect and break through the tiles drenching the workers below. The business owner, of course, told the landlord that this was unacceptable and that it needed to be fixed. The landlord did not fix the problem and it continued. The business owner stated more adamantly that it was unacceptable. The landlord still did not attempt to fix the problem. So, after demanding to the landlord in a conversation that there was a problem that needed to be rectified and the landlord refusing to fix the problem; the business owner left and secured new office space. The landlord sued for rent for the remainder of the term and legal fees. After being served, the business owner sought an attorney to assist in the matter, thinking in every way that he was justified in terminating the lease and even knew the term would be constructive eviction. The business owner did not realize one small detail that was required in order to perfect his claim. Put the demand in writing. A very simple thing, really, but a small paragraph stood in the way of reaching the goals of the business owner. The attorney that was hired after the suit already had been commenced was forced to argue the facts already established and attempt to negotiate a favorable settlement.
 The New Paradigm:
 Large corporations have the resources and the legal work to make it worth investing in employed in-house counsel. The Fortune 500 companies have counsel and legal departments dedicated to the work of that company, saving time, money, and allowing for a better service due to the attorneys understanding the goals, and inner-workings of the company. The new paradigm in legal service gives small and medium businesses the power to leverage the resources of an in-house legal department, without the same Fortune 500-sized investment in money, time, and oversight.
 In business, there are many traps in which a business owner or manager can fall. Employment regulations, taxation, and compliance with local, state, and federal laws regulating business and specific industries are very complex and confusing, making it difficult for the business owner to be assured that they are navigating with low risk to the company. Plans will be customized based on your company size and industry needs, so that your attorney can point you in the right direction and help you get to your goals in real-time. The business owner in our true tale, would have been better served with counsel who will not bill for the phone call, email, text, or meeting. The business owner would have been better served by the counsel who is aware of the issue with the water damage, because the counsel has stopped in to say hi, and see how things are going, without billing for that time.
 Many times laws change without much fanfare, or the statements about changed laws are confusing or incorrect. The new paradigm of law service will allow your business to be updated on laws that affect your business or industry and advice is from a source that works for you.

The need for a Contract: Any good attorney will tell you to put it in writing. This is not just a way for attorneys to get more work, but advice learned from countless mistakes of others. For three years, the budding lawyer studies contracts gone wrong. A case doesn't make it into the law textbooks if everything went swimmingly. A very large percentage of contract law texts have parties that are related, good friends, or thought it noble to do business on a hand shake. A good friend of mine even once said, that if we have to write a contract then we probably shouldn't do business. This is the exact same thought of many very savvy people, who if follow this will have a good chance at having their agreement fall apart. My answer is plain, if I didn't trust you, I would be very hesitant to enter into a contract. A contract is a memorial of the terms of the deal. We write it down and sign it as to say that, no matter today, tomorrow, or 10 years from now when we forget the intricacies of the deal we can look at this and have a fair resolution. This is not to say that many contracts will end in litigation, it happens of course. But, again that is why contracts are sometimes lengthy and detailed. The more that is accurately spelled out in the contract the less room for mistake. The key there is accuracy. It is one thing to have a deal put together and agreed on, it is quite another to have the writing reflect the deal. If a contract is supposed to be a memorial of the terms of the agreement and the parties worked hard to iron out many of the possible details that can be foreseen, it means nothing if the drafter cannot write the terms to reflect the exact deal. It is a technical art in some ways, it really is like a painter who is looking at a landscape- everyone agrees that the landscape is the deal, we can see it. The reproduction and memorial of that is the art and great skill is needed. If you are considering entering into a contract or partnering to start a new venture, make sure you speak to an lawyer, someone who is familiar with contracts and better if they are familiar with the subject matter of the agreement.

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These are photos provided to me by Allen and Mary Lou Casey, the owners of the beautiful Holland Building, in which I have my office.  This is an historic building that captures the spirit of such a great downtown resurgence.
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Neally Law is located on the 5th Floor of this historical building opened in 1915. 
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