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Buffalo Butte Ranch
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In late April some parts of the state were labeled “severe drought”.  That has changed!!  We have had the best possible scenario for the chicks.  And we are seeing a lot of chicks!  Have spotted brood sizes with as many as 15 per brood.  Amazing!!  The first chick sighting was in early June and this morning (July 6th) saw a hen with her estimated 2 – 3 day old family.  I am sure there are plenty more yet to hatch and a lot in between.  This should set the stage for a perfect season with adult birds at the start of the season and maturing birds for the mid to late season hunters.  I can’t help but to believe that when the GF&P comes out with their pheasant report late summer that the bird numbers will be impressive. Read more about our pheasant hunting outlook: http://www.buffalobutte.com/blog/buffalo-butte-ranch-spring-chick-report/ #pheasanthunting #southdakota
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2015-07-15
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While pheasant hunting or talking about pheasant hunting with anybody the term “food plot” tends to come up often. You can’t talk about surfing without referencing the ocean or mountain climbing without the mountain. Pheasant hunting and “food plots” are no different here in South Dakota. To begin with, I would like to clarify what a food plot actually is. It is any form of crop that is planted specifically for wildlife to utilize. Typically, it is planted as an afterthought on a farm next to a shelter belt or adjacent to wetlands and draws. Some farmers will put a narrow band of corn or milo off on its own but we mostly lean towards milo, or its proper name of sorghum, because the birds flourish in it and it doesn’t get too tall to hunt. http://www.buffalobutte.com/blog/spring-food-plot-planting/  #pheasanthunting #pheasants #farming  
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Each fall the hunters arrive to hunt our plentiful pheasant population while pushing strips of milo and corn. One would think that the preparation for these hunting groups would consist of stocking the pantry, mowing the lawns, cleaning the lodge, etc. But the actual real prepping for the hunting groups takes place in the spring. After the winter has come and gone, leaving only brown, dead, and barren fields in its wake, we must break out all the equipment from the machinery sheds and put them to work in the fields. It’s planting season!

Read the rest at our blog: http://www.buffalobutte.com/blog/2015-spring-planting/
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2014-05-10
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View our new promotional video produced by Whiteout Media.

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