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JE Carter, II
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JE Carter, II

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Courtesy Notice:  As life is short, there are two sorts of people I must regretfully decline to allow to follow me on G+:

those profiles that, due to a lack of evidence of life behind the random posts and pretty pictures I must conclude are bots or people who wish to follow me without actually engaging in conversations.  Since I can't measure something from nothing, such profiles do get blocked on sight.   

And, those individuals who resort not to reason but hyperbole and emotion to argue for argument's sake.  I have no time for this sort of hand wringing and ego flexing.  Shame on me if I respond to such people at all, but those following me and slinging their dung in my direction will also be pruned.  

If you like what I post publicly but fall into either category, simply don't add me to your circles and you'll continue to see my public posts when you visit my profile.  
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JE Carter, II

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My berry bush order came earlier than expected, but that worked out well as the weather turned unseasonably (or rather, more seasonably) cool and planting them wasn't much of a chore.  To the slowly growing growing operation we have as of this week added:

20 Jersey blueberry bushes
27 red raspberry canes on good roots
and - to be planted some other night this week yet
100 everbearing strawberry plants.  

I am going to try to get the strawberries established in straw but I'm concerned about the wind carrying them away.  Straw is desirable because it provides good drainage and makes weeding easier.  With what I have on hand, I should have enough, but we might wind up tucking many of these in with the mums on the west side of the house.
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Mark Barton's profile photoRyan Gallagher's profile photoJE Carter, II's profile photo
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Thanks for the info.  Will do as soon as I get home.

JE Carter, II

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Level Billing on CNG a good deal?

Did you get an offer in the mail for level billing on your monthly gas bill that promises to save you money?  It just might, this year.

According to the US Energy Information Administration, we are on the tail end of a slide to historic low prices for dollars per million BTU's delivered gas.

https://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdm.htm

You might look at this chart and conclude that level billing would be a losing proposition for you, which would be true if the price continues to slide.  But, there are signs it can't, and so to determine if this is a good deal for you or not, you'll need to do a little math.

First those 'signs' I mention.  With prices so low, the industry is feeling pinched.  Their operating capital and profit comes from the price they can charge customers for their product.  The lower the market price (more supply) the less profit for them.  Eventually, apart from what might be (wrongly) ascribed to greed, the basic economics in a very mechanical sense provide a buffer on production due to the cost to operate wells, compress and transport the fuel.  Put another way, I can't run at full production output when the profit only pays for half production output.  So it is likely that production will decline this year, decreasing supply towards late fall, and making the prices next fall and winter begin to climb out of this trough.

Now the math you'll want to do is pretty simple but you need to get all of your gas bills for the past 12 months together.  You want to figure out the total ccf you purchased and the total dollars you spent on all of these.  Then you will want to compute your personal average cost per ccf.  You want to look at a year's worth of data because any given month you may have paid more or less per ccf.  If the level billing (sometimes called flat billing) offer you get is a nickle or more less than what you paid last year, you are in a good position.  You will certainly save money over last year.  The worst you can do is not save as much if the market prices stay at historic lows, which isn't terribly likely.
Year, Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec. 1997, 3.45, 2.15, 1.89, 2.03, 2.25, 2.20, 2.19, 2.49, 2.88, 3.07, 3.01, 2.35. 1998, 2.09, 2.23, 2.24, 2.43, 2.14, 2.17, 2.17, 1.85, 2.02, 1.91, 2.12, 1.72. 1999, 1.85, 1.77, 1.79, 2.15, 2.26, 2.30, 2.31, 2.80, 2.55, 2.73 ...
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JE Carter, II

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Evil will always start by asking to be tolerated, then to be accommodated, and ends with demanding domination and the silencing of dissent...
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Thought this was another Captain America: Civil War promo.

JE Carter, II

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First, understand that the US Government restricted the export of encryption for a while.  You had 128 bit encrypted Lotus Notes in the US, and 40 bit for the rest of the world.  Why 40 you ask?  The NSA had 8 bits of that key, provided by IBM upon request.

Now, with a later release, the NSA no longer requested any key fragment, and no restriction was placed on the export strength.  Think about that.  Why would the NSA no longer appear to care about encryption?  Because they have a big enough computer farm / grid / cloud to crack pretty much any encryption key via brute force.  

Sometime within the last three years, someone demonstrated that you can make use of Amazon cloud services to run you own encryption buster with the power of a distributed cloud.  Encryption really doesn't buy you a whole lot any longer except a delay between you creating the information and the government, or anyone with access to the information, reading it.

Further, flaws were uncovered recently in RSA encryption, long thought to be the benchmark, that allowed an accelerated crack based on predicting the random number used to generate the keys because the method used to generate the random numbers wasn't all that random.  This is almost as bad as Netscape in the 90's using the same random number for each instance of the browsers SSL encryption.  Nobody was secure with that version of Netscape once the secret was out.

So, outlawing encryption basically does do something terrible.  It makes what is difficult trivially easy, namely unfettered access to your sensitive information by any moke in the middle.  So there is some protection value for consumers to be able to use encryption.  But it's total bunk to suggest the government can't crack it at any time.  Therefore, a law outlawing encryption is as much a good use of time as changing the Daylight Savings dates was.  Yes, that much of a useless gesture.
 
"In its current form, this bill is disastrous for tech companies and consumers. One of the biggest problems is that what it requires may not actually be possible in many situations. For example, WhatsApp recently enabled end-to-end encryption on all messages. Google has done the same with Gmail for a long time. Both companies are incapable of accessing the data sent via its service without physical access to an endpoint device, and any data obtained in transit is certainly not in a “readable format.” This bill would require that the company find a way to turn over that data in a way law enforcement can read and use, even though it’s literally impossible. As policy analyst Julian Sanchez puts it, in some cases this bill is tantamount to asking a company to perform magic:"
A new draft bill in Congress will force tech companies to undermine or break their own security features and encryption anytime law enforcement asks them to. Sound terrible? It is. Here’s what the bill says, and what you can do about it.
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If you know (or believe) anything about remote viewing, you know that at the highest level, there are no secrets.  At all.  Anywhere.  All information is available to all, if they know how to tap into it.

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IRS ok with crime as long as it is a net gain for US Treasury. So, organized crime syndicates: just pay your taxes, the IRS won't report you to other agencies for prosecution due to privacy rules.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/agency-encourages-illegal-immigrant-theft-of-ssns-irs-chief/article/2588288
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Very astute, +JE Carter, II .  It's the same thing with illegal drugs.  They don't care one whit about our health or welfare, etc.; they just don't want us making secret money from drug sales. 
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JE Carter, II

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I've been using Bootstrap for quick and easy web site prettiness for a few years, and Bootstrap has undergone two major revisions in that time.  But, also during that time, the aesthetic direction of the most recognizable products in the corporate environment has become decidedly bland, leaving Bootstrap's Windows 7-esque look and feel behind.   A flatter, bolder and less crowded look and feel is fast becoming the norm, from Windows 10 and Office 365 to IBM Lotus Notes 9.0 Social version.  

W3.CSS has come along with a light-weight, and modern, look and feel that is super easy to implement.  I replaced bootstrap in a simple one page app yesterday in just a couple of hours of playing around.  I have to say, it really makes things easier.  CSS classes are logically related and ordered in ways that make adding effects and styling queues dead-simple.  Hardcore developers may be a little underwhelmed by the lack of complexity, but it is a time saver, and in my case, a client pleaser.

http://www.w3schools.com/w3css/default.asp
Well organized and easy to understand Web bulding tutorials with lots of examples of how to use HTML, CSS, JavaScript, SQL, PHP, and XML.
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JE Carter, II

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I warm to Tubman daily. She is the epitome of American Exceptionalism. 
 
Harriet Tubman was an Underground Railroad conductor but much more: She was an American hero.
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That's good knowledge brother. Thanks for sharing this 

JE Carter, II

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If, as many say, Taxation is theft, then it is the punishment upon a society which has committed the crime of apathy.  Complaining about the sentence after a long tradition of voter apathy doesn't change the fact that you get the government you vote for. The meme should be corrected to state that Taxation is the Penalty for Apathy.
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David Dickens's profile photoJeffrey Schwartz's profile photoJeffO_SeaDawg's profile photoJE Carter, II's profile photo
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It seems to me +JeffO_SeaDawg that the same people who pick up the meme of Taxation is Theft without a rigorous interrogation of the phrase are the same who quickly jump on other mob mentality slogans that think a short cut to the world they want is some form of disruptive violence.  There are no free lunches.  Revolution is a remedy for when all other remedies are long exhausted, and we are far from exhausting our options.  We may be very weary of the fight, and many yet to fall into apathy are questioning their resolve even now, but there is still a general peace and social order to work within.

JE Carter, II

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Something about this, I like.  +JeffO_SeaDawg probably will too.
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+JE Carter, II thanks for the tag. I am thinking I need to check the filters of my gas masks after looking at this. ;)

JE Carter, II

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A 10-year-old boy in Arkansas said his heart sank when his mom sent 21 classmates invitations to his birthday party earlier this month, but nobody showed up.
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This is a great way for police to regain some trust after the problems of late.
Great story!
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474 people
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Currently taking on new clients for freelance, remote, part time engagements. --- System Integration, Software Development, Analysis, Design and Troubleshooting
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Fluent in: SOAP, Visual Basic, Java, JavaScript, Lotusscript, HTML, CSS, AJAX, XML, Windows Systems, Video Production Method and Theory, Mentoring and Team Leadership, Budgeting and Planning - - - Conversant in: C++, C#.NET, NSIS, XSLT, Linux, Telnet, Putty, Virtualization, Video production technologies, Project Management, Digital Signage (Xibo), Apache, Tomcat, MySQL, SQL and DB2 - - - Exposed to: SAP, PHP, SAN/NAS, LDAP, Active Directory, FIM, Sharepoint, Service Now
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Servant of Christ
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Perspective is a matter of Truth.
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