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China’s breakneck growth is slowing, and the drivers of that growth are changing from investment and exports to domestic consumption. This shift is affecting the global economy—but especially commodity exporters, many of which are in Africa. The Chinese Customs office announced recently that China’s imports from Africa fell by almost 40 percent in 2015. Slumping Chinese demand has led to precipitous price declines, putting pressure on the fiscal and external accounts of many African countries. Economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, which averaged 5 to 6 percent over the past two decades, fell below 4 percent in 2015 and is expected to decline further in 2016.
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IMF Survey Magazine

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China’s breakneck growth is slowing, and the drivers of that growth are changing from investment and exports to domestic consumption. This shift is affecting the global economy—but especially commodity exporters, many of which are in Africa. The Chinese Customs office announced recently that China’s imports from Africa fell by almost 40 percent in 2015. Slumping Chinese demand has led to precipitous price declines, putting pressure on the fiscal and external accounts of many African countries. Economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, which averaged 5 to 6 percent over the past two decades, fell below 4 percent in 2015 and is expected to decline further in 2016.
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Does depend on real consumption or manufactured consumption big differences..Lawyers
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Instead of delivering growth, some neoliberal policies have increased inequality, in turn jeopardizing durable expansion, argue three IMF economists
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After 10 years of unprecedented growth, which helped fuel a positive Africa Rising narrative, the outlook for sub-Saharan Africa is dimming. The region suffered a sharp slowdown, owing to slumping commodity prices and softer global economic conditions. Natural resource producers such as Nigeria, Angola, South Africa, and Mozambique have been hard hit. Drought has struck in some countries. And China—now a major trade and business partner in a number of African countries—is slowing as it retools its economy, sparking fears of further weakening.
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The expansion of India’s exports of services between 1990 and 2013 has been nothing short of spectacular, putting India on a par with the world’s high-income economies in terms of service-product sophistication and as a share of total exports. This has created unique opportunities for continued growth. By contrast, when it comes to exports of manufactured goods, India has lagged behind its emerging-markets peers, both in quality and as a percentage of the total export basket, leaving substantial room for improvement.
By Rahul Anand, Kalpana Kochhar, and Saurabh Mishra The expansion of India’s exports of services between 1990 and 2013 has been nothing short of spectacular, putting India on a par with the world’s…
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Because of its sheer size and integration into the global economy, China’s transition will certainly affect those around it. China is now the top trading partner of most major economies in the region, particularly in East Asia and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). During 2000–15, exports to China increased dramatically from 3 percent to 9 percent of world exports and from 9 percent to 22 percent of Asian exports. According to IMF staff calculations, a 1 percentage point change in China’s real GDP growth is estimated to affect the real GDP growth of the median Asian economy by 0.15–0.30 of a percentage point.
By Serkan Arslanalp, Thomas Helbling, Jaewoo Lee, and Koshy Mathai Version in 中文 (Chinese) China’s economy leaves nobody indifferent. The world is watching closely as the second largest economy in…
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By vigorously reducing corruption, countries can improve economic stability and boost growth and development, according to a new IMF staff paper. Public corruption, defined as an abuse of public office for private gain, afflicts economies at all stages of development. Governments around the world face the challenge of addressing citizens’ increased concerns over high corruption as evidenced by recent scandals in many countries. “While the direct economic costs of corruption are well known, the indirect costs may be even more substantial and debilitating, leading to low growth and greater income inequality. Corruption also has a broader corrosive impact on society. It undermines trust in government and erodes the ethical standards of private citizens,” said IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde.
By vigorously reducing corruption, countries can improve economic stability and boost growth and development, according to a new IMF staff paper.
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Instead of delivering growth, some neoliberal policies have increased inequality, in turn jeopardizing durable expansion, argue three IMF economists
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Politics and media scams do cause most problems for Buisness and growth..Lawyers 
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After 10 years of unprecedented growth, which helped fuel a positive Africa Rising narrative, the outlook for sub-Saharan Africa is dimming. The region suffered a sharp slowdown, owing to slumping commodity prices and softer global economic conditions. Natural resource producers such as Nigeria, Angola, South Africa, and Mozambique have been hard hit. Drought has struck in some countries. And China—now a major trade and business partner in a number of African countries—is slowing as it retools its economy, sparking fears of further weakening.
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The world shrinks every so many years problems for the future
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The International Monetary Fund is increasing demands for Greek debt relief, setting up another potential standoff with creditors over the country’s bailout, and threatening to create more political and economic uncertainty at an already tumultuous time for Europe. This I.M.F.’s position opens the next act in the long-running Greek debt crisis, casting the fund against Germany and many of the other eurozone creditors. The fund is playing the role of the financial police, adamant that Greece will never return to growth if its debt burden is not sustainable. And Germany is the political pragmatist, leaning on Greece to stick with its austerity commitments lest it set a bad precedent for future bailouts and provoke unrest at home.
The fund’s position is counter to Germany’s on the wisdom and future of austerity commitments, potentially setting up a conflict with creditors.
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emerging markets  - 
 
 
Because of its sheer size and integration into the global economy, China’s transition will certainly affect those around it. China is now the top trading partner of most major economies in the region, particularly in East Asia and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). During 2000–15, exports to China increased dramatically from 3 percent to 9 percent of world exports and from 9 percent to 22 percent of Asian exports. According to IMF staff calculations, a 1 percentage point change in China’s real GDP growth is estimated to affect the real GDP growth of the median Asian economy by 0.15–0.30 of a percentage point.
By Serkan Arslanalp, Thomas Helbling, Jaewoo Lee, and Koshy Mathai Version in 中文 (Chinese) China’s economy leaves nobody indifferent. The world is watching closely as the second largest economy in…
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great article
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economic policy  - 
 
 
By vigorously reducing corruption, countries can improve economic stability and boost growth and development, according to a new IMF staff paper. Public corruption, defined as an abuse of public office for private gain, afflicts economies at all stages of development. Governments around the world face the challenge of addressing citizens’ increased concerns over high corruption as evidenced by recent scandals in many countries. “While the direct economic costs of corruption are well known, the indirect costs may be even more substantial and debilitating, leading to low growth and greater income inequality. Corruption also has a broader corrosive impact on society. It undermines trust in government and erodes the ethical standards of private citizens,” said IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde.
By vigorously reducing corruption, countries can improve economic stability and boost growth and development, according to a new IMF staff paper.
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IMF Survey - the news magazine of the International Monetary Fund -- global economic and financial analysis
Introduction
IMF Survey is an online magazine carrying news, views, and analysis from the International Monetary Fund. Intended for a broad audience, the IMF Survey features insight into Fund operations, policy analyses, country developments, globalization, interviews with leading economists, and current issues in international finance. Selected articles from the online Survey are also published on the IMF’s Arabic, Chinese, French, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish websites.
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