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IMF Survey Magazine

Financial sector  - 
 
What to do about abrupt market illiquidity. The risk of illiquidity is significant in many advanced economy corporate bond markets, as well as in bond markets in emerging economies that are experiencing large inflows from investment funds.
By José Viñals Financial market liquidity can be fleeting. The ability to trade in assets of any size, at any time and to find a ready buyer is not a given.  As discussed in some detail last fall i...
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IMF Survey Magazine's profile photoDan Holstad's profile photo
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IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
Time to change.  Energy subsidies cost a whopping US$5.3 trillion-- 6½ percent of global GDP— in 2015. These estimates are shocking. The figure likely exceeds government health spending across the world, estimated by the World Health Organization at 6 percent of global GDP, but for the different year of 2013. They correspond to one of the largest negative externality ever estimated. They have global relevance. And that’s not all: earlier work by the IMF also shows that these subsidies have adverse effects on economic efficiency, growth, and inequality.
By Benedict Clements and Vitor Gaspar (Version in 中文) US$5.3 trillion; 6½ percent of global GDP—that is our latest reckoning of the cost of energy subsidies in 2015. These estimates are shocking. T...
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Ken Wallace's profile photoCarlos Ospino's profile photoDona Dolina's profile photo
 
Eliminate the subsidies and institute a rational carbon tax worldwide, then let the markets sort it out.  A dream, I know. 
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IMF Survey Magazine

economic trends  - 
 
IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
Asia and the Pacific remains the global economic growth leader, but there is considerable diversity in growth trends. The IMF’s Asia and Pacific Department Director Changyong Rhee discusses the outlook, risks, and policy prescriptions for the Asian region. 

See the full report:  http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/reo/2015/apd/eng/areo0415.htm
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IMF Survey Magazine

economic trends  - 
 
IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
Latin America is heading for tougher times. Regional growth is expected to dip below 1 percent in 2015, partly as a result of the drop in global commodity prices. How well placed is the region for the coming lean times?  Countries face this slowdown from much weaker fiscal positions than when the global financial crisis hit. Then, Latin America responded strongly with expansionary fiscal policies, including explicit fiscal stimulus programs in many countries. But, as growth has recovered, this increase in spending has proved difficult to reverse.A new IMF study looks at six large emerging countries of Latin America—Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay—how they reacted to the global financial crisis, the longer-term consequences of their policy choices, and the main lessons for policymakers.
By Alexander Klemm (Version in Español) Latin America is heading for tougher times. Regional growth is expected to dip below 1 percent in 2015, partly as a result of the drop in global commodity pr...
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IMF Survey Magazine

economic trends  - 
 
IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
Growth in Asia and the Pacific will continue to outperform the rest of the world, and is expected to remain steady at 5.6 percent in 2015, easing slightly to 5.5 percent in 2016, according to the IMF’s Regional Economic Outlook for Asia and the Pacific. Growth will be driven by domestic demand, underpinned by healthy labor markets, low interest rates, and the recent fall in oil prices. The global recovery, while moderate and uneven, will continue to support Asia’s exports, say the report’s authors.Performance across the region is expected to be mixed (see table). China’s economy is slowing to a more sustainable pace—6.8 percent GDP growth in 2015, and 6.3 percent in 2016, while growth in Japan is picking up to 1.0 percent this year, and 1.2 percent next year. #asia  
Growth in Asia and the Pacific will continue to outperform the rest of the world, and is expected to remain steady at 5.6 percent in 2015, easing slightly to 5.5 percent in 2016, according to the IMF&rsquo;s Regional Economic Outlook<i> </i>for Asia and the Pacific.
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Cheaper, more easily available energy storage helps at the scale of the power grid, and also at the level of our homes, to further advantage cleaner, renewable energy. So if the economics of storage are finally starting to line up - and its business side to ramp up - that can only be good news for the planet.
The economics of large scale energy storage are close to reaching a tipping point.
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I am excited about this. This can be a big step to homes who use solar power system.
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IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
Eenergy price reforms substantially reduce the need to subsidize renewable energies and are the most effective policies for promoting opportunities to mitigate environmental impacts across the economy.
By Sanjeev Gupta and Michael Keen In their blog, Ben Clements and Vitor Gaspar make the points that global energy subsidies are still very substantial, that there is a strong need for reform in man...
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IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
Good data can help policymakers identify and manage financial vulnerabilities. And while the quality of data from advanced economies is getting better and more accessible to the public, data from some developing countries is often lacking altogether. In an interview with IMF Survey, Louis Marc Ducharme, Director of Statistics, says the IMF has launched a new initiative to help fill those data gaps.
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IMF Survey Magazine

Discussion Board  - 
 
IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
An assessment of Olivier Blanchard, who will retire asthe IMF;s chief economist, in September
THERE is a popular quip (popular in some circles, anyway) that the International Monetary Fund’s acronym stands for “It’s Mostly Fiscal”. In the 1990s it was...
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IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
The IMF’s Céline Allard says sub-Saharan Africa is set for another year of solid performance despite declining commodities, with a projected growth rate of 4.5 percent for 2015.
IMF Podcasts
Sub-Saharan Africa’s Latest Economic Outlook
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IMF Survey Magazine

economic trends  - 
 
IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
The Middle East and North Africa region is experiencing a modest economic recovery, despite the sharp drop in oil prices and deepening conflicts, the IMF says in its latest regional assessment. The Regional Economic Outlook Update, released on May 5, projects that growth will increase slightly to about 3 percent in 2015 (see table). But growth rates, although rising, remain too low to reduce the region’s persistently high unemployment in a meaningful way. “Although the region’s countries have made progress in implementing reforms, there is still more that can be done—not just to stabilize the economy but to raise economic prospects in a sustainable, inclusive manner,” Masood Ahmed, Director of the IMF’s Middle East and Central Asia Department, told reporters at a briefing in Dubai.
The Middle East and North Africa region is experiencing a modest economic recovery, despite the sharp drop in oil prices and deepening conflicts, the IMF says in its latest regional assessment.
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IMF Survey Magazine

emerging markets  - 
 
IMF Survey Magazine originally shared:
 
IMF economists Ratna Sahay, Martin Čihák, and Papa N’Diaye show that financial development entails tradeoffs. Our analysis uncovers evidence of “too much finance” in the sense that beyond a certain level of financial development, the positive effect on economic growth begins to decline, while costs in terms of economic and financial volatility begin to rise. The analysis shows that these tradeoffs can be improved by strong institutions and a sound regulatory and supervisory environment. In other words, regulatory reforms can increase the benefits from financial development while reducing the risks.  We find that the gains for growth as well as for economic and financial stability from further financial development remain large for most emerging markets.  But there are speed limits on financial deepening: when financial sectors deepen too fast, it often leads to crises and instability.
By Ratna Sahay, Martin Čihák, and Papa N’Diaye  The world still lives in the shadow of the global financial crisis that began in the United States in 2008.  The U.S. experience shone a spotlight on...
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Will read later.
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IMF Survey - the news magazine of the International Monetary Fund -- global economic and financial analysis
Introduction
IMF Survey is an online magazine carrying news, views, and analysis from the International Monetary Fund. Intended for a broad audience, the IMF Survey features insight into Fund operations, policy analyses, country developments, globalization, interviews with leading economists, and current issues in international finance. Selected articles from the online Survey are also published on the IMF’s Arabic, Chinese, French, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish websites.