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Elevators Lift Escalators Industry in Nigeria
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ELEVATOR IN NEWLY REOPENED WASHINGTON MONUMENT STOPS
The elevator taking visitors 500 ft. up to an observation deck at the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., broke down twice on May 14, two days after the tourist attraction reopened after being closed for renovations since summer 2011, The Washington Post reports. No passengers were trapped for long, but 61 people on the deck had to take 896 steps down as the result of one of the breakdowns. By the evening, the elevator had been serviced and was operational. Approximately US$15 million in earthquake damage repair mainly went toward stone-façade restoration and did not include the elevator
- See more at: http://www.elevatorworld.com/

9 Things You need to Know About Elevators
Over the last 150 years, the lift has created urban life as we know it.
Few inventions have changed the design of the modern city like the elevator. The ability to shuttle groups of people rapidly hundreds of feet into the air has transformed the way we live, work, and travel. Without mechanical lifts, we could not live or work in skyscrapers. The density of metropolises like New York City would be entirely impossible, replaced by a sea of five- and six-story walkups.
And yet, as elevator historian Daniel Levinson Wilk told the Boston Globe recently, “The lack of interest scholars have shown in the cultural life of elevators is appalling.” Appalling indeed, because the history of the elevator is fascinating. Here are just a fascinating tidbits about this transformative piece of technology:
1. The first modern elevators were in the lobbies of luxury hotels. The world's first passenger elevator was installed in a New York City hotel in 1857. In the 1870s, the technology finally moved into office buildings, allowing businesses to grow up instead of out.
Image: Elevator via Shutterstock
2. There are now 900,000 elevators in America. About the same number of new elevators--914,000--were sold in the world in 2012. (58% of those new elevators went to China.)
3. Early elevators were considered "movable rooms." They featured chandeliers and elaborate furniture and carpeting. Passengers sat down and got comfortable before being catapulted onto another floor.
4. Without the elevator, there would be no penthouse. The adoption of the elevator radically changed how people arranged multistory buildings. Before the elevator, the highest levels of a home would be reserved for the servants or low-rent tenants, who could be expected to hoof it up multiple flights of stairs, while the movers and shakers of the world lived on the easily accessible lower floors. Once elevators began ferrying tenants in style to the upper floors, the rich began to appreciate the view from the top, giving rise to the penthouse.
5. In fact, without elevators, cities as we know them couldn't exist. “If we didn’t have elevators ... we would have a megalopolis, one continuous city, stretching from Philadelphia to Boston, because everything would be five or six stories tall," according to Patrick Carrajat, founder of New York's Elevator Museum. In the 1870s, Equitable Life Assurance Society CEO Henry B. Boyle changed New York's financial district forever by building the tallest building in the city at that time--a full seven stories, with a pair of elevators.
6. In the early 1900s, people worried vertical transport would make us sick. Doctors used to fret over "elevator sickness," a condition caused by the sudden movement of internal organs as an elevator came to an abrupt stop.
7. We've always been uncomfortable in elevators. When gentlemen were still expected to take off their hats in a woman's presence, people couldn't figure out whether an elevator counted as a room, and thus whether hats were expected to be doffed. Now, we just worry about avoiding eye contact.
8. Dispatch efficiency could kill the elevator pitch. New elevators employ what's called "destination dispatch," a system that directs people going to the same floors of a building into the same elevator. This allows people to get where they're going faster and more efficiently--but at the price of segregating employees headed to different floors. In a company that spans multiple floors, that makes it much less likely that the CEO will get trapped in an elevator with the intern.
9. There’s a monthly magazine called Elevator World. It’s a trade magazine for the International Building Transportation Industry,

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TOP FIVE LIFT COMPANIES IN NIGERIA
ADUMEK ELEVATORS
ORION ELEVATORS LIMITED
COXDYN Nigeria Limited
Kresta Laurel Limited | Elevators
ARMSRONG ELEVATORS

Post has attachment
TOP FIVE LIFT INDUSTRIES IN NIGERIA
ADUMEK ELEVATORS
ORION ELEVATORS LIMITED
COXDYN Nigeria Limited
Kresta Laurel Limited | Elevators
ARMSRONG ELEVATORS

Regenerative Drives
Regenerative drives represent one of the most significant innovations in the latest generation of energy-efficient elevator technology. When an elevator goes up with a light load and down with a heavy load, the system generates more power than it uses. That power is lost as heat in traditional elevator drives, wasting substantial amounts of energy over the life of the elevator. Regenerative drives capture the heat generated by elevators during use and convert it into reusable energy for the building rather than wasting it as heat.
When power flows into the elevator motor, it creates a lifting torque on the shaft and elevator sheave, lifting the cab. When the cab travels down, the motor acts as a generator, transforming mechanical power into electrical power and pumping current back into the facility's electrical grid where it can be reused by another elevator or to power other electrical loads.
Over time these small amounts of power generated during the deceleration of each elevator add up to noticeable savings. Regenerative drives can reduce the energy consumed by building transportation systems by up to 70% and can even reduce the strain and cost of the HVAC system by eliminating excess heat in the building.

Machine Room-Less Elevators
Machine Room-Less (MRL) elevators are the result of advances in technology in which the reduction in size of components, such as permanent magnet motor (PMM), allows the machine to be located in the elevator hoistway. This breakthrough innovation eliminates the need for an elevator machine room, in effect, substantially reducing the size of motors used for traction equipment. With the machine room no longer necessary, architects can design buildings with greater flexibility and more leasable space for building owners.
MRL elevators also provide significant energy savings of up to 50-80% compared to conventional hydraulic and geared traction elevators. An MRL's permanent magnet motors and gearless traction machines offer superior performance and ride quality, with less wasted energy due to their more efficient design. Having no machine room to light and air condition provides additional savings for the building owner. Moving the traction equipment into the hoistway eliminates the higher cost and environmental concerns associated with buried hydraulic elevators filled with oil which can leak and require costly cleanup.
Initially introduced to the U.S. market in the 1990s, MRL elevators are now considered the industry-standard for low and mid-rise buildings serving up to 20 floors.

 How ELEVATORS Work
 Today, there are basically two types of elevators in use—hydraulic and “rope-driven.” Chains or cables loop through the bottom of the counterweight to the underside  of the car to help maintain balance by offsetting the weight of the suspension  ropes. Guide rails that run the length of the shaft keep the car and  counterweight from swaying or twisting during travel. Rollers are attached to  the car and the counterweight to provide a smooth ride along the guide rails.  An electric motor then turns the sheave. These motors are able to control speed  and allow for the elevator's smooth acceleration and deceleration. Signal  switches also stop the cab at each floor level.  
 In a hydraulic elevator, the car is lifted by a hydraulic-fluid driven piston  mounted inside a cylinder. The cylinder—containing oil or a similar substance—is connected to a pumping system. The pump forces fluid into the tank leading to  the cylinder; when enough fluid is collected, the piston is pushed upward,  lifting the elevator car on its journey. When the car is signaled that it is  approaching the correct floor, the control system will trigger the electric  motor to gradually shut off the pump. To get the elevator to descend, the  control system will send a signal to the valve operated electronically by a  switch. When the valve is opened, the fluid flows out into a central reservoir,  and the weight of the car and its cargo pushes down on the piston, driving more  fluid out and causing the cab to move down.  
 Hydraulic elevators, says Brian Black, code and safety consultant for National  Elevator Industry Inc., are fairly common nationwide, but are usually found in  low-rise buildings of less than six stories. This is probably why they are  outnumbered by traction elevators in the New York area. One well-known group of  hydraulic elevators in New York can be found at Macy’s on the Fulton Mall in Brooklyn, formerly Abraham & Straus.  
 One of the most important changes in elevator maintenance during the past 20 or  30 years, says Michael Halpin, organizer for Local 1, International Union of  Elevator Constructors, New York and New Jersey, is a factor that has increased  safety—apprenticeship training for journeymen elevator repairers and maintainers.  
 “Journeymen now go through a four-year, state-certified apprenticeship program,” he says. “Before, there was education but there wasn’t a certified apprenticeship program.” Responsible contractors, he said, hire mechanics who go through this  apprenticeship program

What To Do If You Are In A Stalled Elevator:
Push the "Door Open" Button
If you are near the landing the door will open. You can slowly and carefully step out of the elevator. Be sure to watch your step as the elevator floor may, or may not, be level with the landing.
Remain Calm
If the door does not open, you are still safe. Do not try to exit the elevator. Wait for trained emergency personnel to arrive. Even if the air temperature feels warm, there is plenty of air circulating in the elevator and its hoistway.
Press the Alarm or Phone Button, and Use Any Available Communication Systems
Push the alarm button and wait for someone to respond to you.
In newer elevators, there will be a phone button instead of an alarm button . When pushed, this will place a call to a party that is trained to take action (i.e. elevator company, alarm company, etc.). It will give the exact location of the building and elevator you are in.
Some elevators have a two-way speaker system or telephone that will allow for communication between you and the building or rescue personnel. Do not be alarmed if you cannot be heard or if the phone does not work. Some phones are designed only to receive calls. Trained personnel should call when they arrive at the building.
Relax, and DO NOT Try to Extract Yourself from the Elevator
NEVER try to exit a stalled elevator car. It is extremely dangerous. ALWAYS wait for trained emergency personnel.
our best course of action is to relax, get comfortable, and wait for professional assistance.
You may be inconvenienced but you are SAFE.

What To Do If You Are In A Stalled Elevator:
Push the "Door Open" Button
If you are near the landing the door will open. You can slowly and carefully step out of the elevator. Be sure to watch your step as the elevator floor may, or may not, be level with the landing.
Remain Calm
If the door does not open, you are still safe. Do not try to exit the elevator. Wait for trained emergency personnel to arrive. Even if the air temperature feels warm, there is plenty of air circulating in the elevator and its hoistway.
Press the Alarm or Phone Button, and Use Any Available Communication Systems
Push the alarm button and wait for someone to respond to you.
In newer elevators, there will be a phone button instead of an alarm button . When pushed, this will place a call to a party that is trained to take action (i.e. elevator company, alarm company, etc.). It will give the exact location of the building and elevator you are in.
Some elevators have a two-way speaker system or telephone that will allow for communication between you and the building or rescue personnel. Do not be alarmed if you cannot be heard or if the phone does not work. Some phones are designed only to receive calls. Trained personnel should call when they arrive at the building.
Relax, and DO NOT Try to Extract Yourself from the Elevator
NEVER try to exit a stalled elevator car. It is extremely dangerous. ALWAYS wait for trained emergency personnel.
our best course of action is to relax, get comfortable, and wait for professional assistance.
You may be inconvenienced but you are SAFE.

Escalator and Moving Walk Safety
When entering escalators/moving walks:
Watch the direction of the moving step and step on and off with extra care.
Take care if you are wearing bifocals or similar eyewear.
Hold children firmly with one arm or hold child's free hand.
Hold packages firmly in one hand, but always leave one hand available to hold the handrail.
Grasp the handrail as you step onto the moving step.
Do not go in the opposite direction of the escalator/moving walk.
Do not take strollers, wheelchairs, electric scooters, hand carts, luggage carts or similar items on the escalator/moving walk.
When riding escalators:
Keep loose clothing clear of steps and sides.
Wear closed-toed and hard-soled shoes, and avoid wearing footwear made of soft-resin or other rubbery materials.
Stand clear of the sides of the escalator/moving walk.
Face forward and hold handrail for the entire ride.
Reposition your hand slowly if the handrail moves slightly ahead or behind the steps.
Don't rest any items or parcels on the handrail, outer deck or lean against the sides.
Don't climb onto or ride the handrail.
Do not let children sit on steps or stand too close to sides.
If children are too small to hold handrail, or holding the handrail positions them close to the side of the escalator/moving walk, hold their hand and keep them centered on the step.
When exiting escalators:
Don't hesitate and step off promptly.
On an escalator, be sure to step over the comb fingers; don't let your feet slide off the end of the escalator.
Immediately move clear of the escalator/moving walk exit area; don't stop to talk or look around since other passengers may be behind you.
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