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CuriousLabx
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The main business line of Curious LabX is offshore services in software development, covering topics related to web based solutions.
The main business line of Curious LabX is offshore services in software development, covering topics related to web based solutions.

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HP is finally going to start making 3D printers
The world’s biggest printer company is finally ready to make the leap into the third dimension.
HP (the technology half of the former company Hewlett-Packard) announced today that it will be releasing two industrial 3D printers that it claims will produce objects ten times faster and half as expensively as any similar printer on the market. The two printers, called the Jet Fusion 3200 and 4200, will be “commercial grade” machines that can print ready-to-use products, HP’s head of 3D printing, Stephen Nigro, told Quartz. Unlike most HP printers, these are not meant for the average home or office—the Jet Fusion line will start at $130,000.
HP has been teasing a 3D printer for the last two years, and at a 3D printing conference in New York last spring, showed a demonstration of a hard plastic chain it had printed on its prototype machine that was able to lift a car.
The production model prints will have that level of durability and reliability, according to Nigro. Half of the parts for the printer itself will even be printed by one of the printers. “We are creating a printer that prints itself,” Nigro said.
To begin with, HP wanted to focus on machines that could reliably print out plastic products, but it’s launching a “material app store” where third-party companies will be able to develop materials for the Jet Fusions, which HP will vet, and then sell through the store. HP is currently testing printers that could also print integrated circuits (something it’s not alone in doing), and has done that same chain test, but this time with embedded circuits printed in that can show of the stress and strain the chain is under.
The company is looking into being able to print metals on future printers, but don’t expect to see that anytime soon: “Metals is a research project for us,” Nigro said. It’s also researching printers that can print out multiple materials at once (like Stratasys’ recent printer). For now, Nigro said, the company wants to focus on machines that could make products that could go right into use.
Many companies are looking into 3D printing as a method for producing their products, but for the most part, 3D printing’s benefits to date have been just in prototyping: 3D printers allow designers and engineers to rapidly mock up models for products and iterate on their designs until they’re happy. The printers available so far have either not allowed them to print quickly at scale, or haven’t printed with materials that can stand the test of time.
Nigro said HP’s printers will be cheaper than what’s come before, and in certain cases, could replace traditional manufacturing processes, where molds of products have to be made. Both printers have a printing bed that allows them to print roughly 2,500 1.5-inch plastic gears in about 10 hours—Nigro said that in this same time period, a standard desktop printer, like a MakerBot machine, might only print about 20 gears.
HP has been working with corporate partners, including BMW, Nike, and Siemens—all of whom are interested in integrating 3D printing into their production lines—to design the printers, and will be among the first customers to receive the machines. Everyone else that wants a machine will have to wait until the end of the year, when the printers start shipping.
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Why is Earth Day on April 22?

April 22, 1970 – Arbor Day – was the first Earth Day. Today, a common practice in celebration of Earth Day is still to plant new trees.

The first Earth Day – April 22, 1970 – marked the beginning of the modern environmental movement. Approximately 20 million Americans, especially on college campuses, participated in a national teach-in on environmental issues and protests against environmental deterioration on the first Earth Day. It’s hard to imagine it now, but the first Earth Day was a revelation to many, a way not only of raising consciousness about environmental issues but also of bringing together separate groups that had been fighting separately against issues including oil spills, pollutions from factories and power plants, raw sewage, toxic dumps, pesticides, the loss of wilderness, air pollution and more. Since then, Earth Day is always celebrated on April 22. But why April 22?

Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson is widely credited with suggesting the first Earth Day on April 22. It was a movement whose time had come, and Nelson wasn’t alone in 1970 in suggesting a grassroots demonstration aimed at protecting the environment. San Francisco activist John McConnell also asked Americans to join in a demonstration in 1970, and McConnell chose the spring equinox (March 21, 1970) as his date. Today, you can find Earth Day events on both the spring equinox and April 22.
April 22 continues to be the larger event, however, and the official date of Earth Day. Some say April 22 was chosen to maximize the number of students who could be reached on university campuses, and that’s undoubtedly true. But the April 22 date for the first Earth Day also stemmed from a much-earlier observance: Arbor Day, which began in Nebraska in 1872.

J. Sterling Morton was a Nebraska pioneer, a writer and editor for Nebraska’s first newspaper, and later secretary of the Nebraska Territory. He advocated planting trees in what was then a dusty and treeless prairie. At a meeting of the State Board of Agriculture in January 1872, Morton proposed that Nebraska citizens set aside April 10 as a day to plant trees. He suggested offering prizes as incentives for communities and organizations that planted the most trees. It’s said that Nebraskans planted about one million trees on that first Arbor Day in 1872. Ten years later, in 1882, Nebraska declared Arbor Day as a legal holiday and the date was changed to Morton’s birthday, April 22. Arbor Day grew to become a national observance. I can recall learning about it as a child in the 1950s and ’60s.
It seemed natural to schedule April 22, 1970 – Arbor Day – as the first Earth Day. Today, a common practice in celebration of Earth Day is still to plant new trees.

Bottom line: Why do we celebrate Earth Day on April 22? The date stems from an earlier observance, Arbor Day. And the date of Arbor Day was set due to the birthday of J. Sterling Morton, a Nebraska pioneer and journalist, who launched the first Arbor Day in 1872.
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Google Joins Effort to Stop Zika Virus Spread
Google last week announced it would contribute US$1 million to the UN Children's Fund to support the global fight against the mosquito-borne Zika virus.
A team of Google engineers has volunteered to work with UNICEF to analyze data in an effort to figure out the viral infection's path. It also will match employee donations with the goal of giving an extra $500,000 to UNICEF and the Pan American Health Organization.
The company took the actions following recent Zika virus outbreaks that caused a 3,000 percent increase in global search interest since November.
Last month, the World Health Organization declared a public health emergency.
Coordinated Effort
The possible correlation with Zika, microcephaly and other birth defects is alarming, Google said. Four out of five people with the virus don't show any symptoms, and the primary transmitter, the Aedes mosquito, is widespread and challenging to eliminate.
vedio link: https://youtu.be/A1_SiG0yEUw
UNICEF is working with Google engineers and data scientists to create an open source information platform to help UNICEF and partners on the ground target Zika response efforts, according to Chris Fabian, colead of UNICEF's innovation unit.
"This open source platform will be able to process information like mobility patterns and weather data to build risk maps. We plan to prototype this tool in the Zika response but expand it for use globally," he told TechNewsWorld.
Open Source Platform
The plan calls for Google software engineers John Li and Zora Tung, along with UNICEF research scientist Manuel Garcia Herranz and UX designer Tanya Bhandari, to work on the open source data platform. It will process data from different sources, such as weather and travel patterns, to visualize potential outbreaks.
Ultimately, the goal of the platform is to identify the risk of Zika transmission for different regions and help UNICEF, governments and nongovernmental organizations decide how and where to focus their time and resources. If successful, it can be applied to other outbreaks.
"Financial contributions and donations are always beneficial, but it is hard to say whether or not tracking the virus itself will have significant contributions," said Sarah Lisovich, content strategist at CIA Medical.
Putting Analytics to Work
The symptoms are similar to those of other common healthcare conditions, she told TechNewsWorld.
Google is a leader in terms of research tools and putting forth tools to help understand the outbreak and bring more awareness and comprehension, Lisovich added.
Analytics has been used to track mosquito-borne illnesses such as malaria, dengue fever and West Nile virus for years, according to Jamie Powers, health industry consultant at SAS Institute. In addition to understanding and learning from past events, analytics can quickly create new knowledge from billions of data points and multiple disparate data sets to provide the best input for predictive analytics.
"Text mining and social media analysis to track specific disease symptoms -- syndromic surveillance -- can also help detect the earliest stages of infectious-disease outbreaks, whether it is measles, H1N1, Ebola ... or Zika," he told TechNewsWorld.
Respected Efforts
Google's contribution to the epidemiology of the Zika virus is a critical initial step for public health. It is significant not only for tracking the spread of the virus but for providing the public with information on it, said David Eling, director of business development at ProSci.
Empowering people with knowledge of where Zika is prevalent, how it is transmitted, and methods of minimizing risk is a critical job, he told TechNewsWorld.
"The more we know about the Zika virus, the more ways we will have to combat it," Eling said. "I have confidence that with this support and our growing knowledge that we will develop both a vaccine as well as a therapeutic against Zika."
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Jason Day wins Match Play

LOS ANGELES - Australian Jason Day celebrated his return to world number one with his second WGC Match Play crown on Sunday, beating Louis Oosthuizen 5 and 4 in the title match.
Day, was assured of regaining the world number one ranking on Saturday when he reached the semi-finals as American Jordan Spieth was eliminated in the round of 16. And on Sunday, five days after fearing a bad back might force him out after his opening match on Wednesday, Day completed an unbeaten week at Austin Country Club in Texas with a gritty 1 up semi-final win over defending champion Rory McIlroy followed by his victory over Oosthuizen. “To be able to play the way I did from tee to green and then on top of it make tough matches and hit the clutch shots has been fantastic,” said Day, who arrived in Austin off a win last Sunday at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in Bay Hill. 
Day joined Tiger Woods and fellow Australian Geoff Ogilvy as multiple Match Play winners. He won his first title in 2014 in Arizona before the tournament adopted its current round-robin format for the first three days. Third-seeded McIlroy, denied a chance to join Woods as the only back-to-back winners of the event, then was beaten 3 and 2 in the consolation final by 52nd-seeded Spaniard Rafa Cabrera Bello.
Oosthuizen, the 16th seed, had beaten Cabrera Bello 4 and 3 in the semis, but he was no match for the second seeded Day in the final. Day opened the title match with a bogey to go 1 down, but squared the match at the third when Oosthuizen conceded the hole in the wake of a wayward tee shot.
Day took a 1 up lead with an 11-foot birdie at the fourth and stretched his lead from there. He was 3 up through nine, and drained a six-footer for birdie at the 13th to go 4 up. He landed his approach at 14 within three feet for a birdie to seal the win. “I’m very, very thrilled. It’s been a memorable week this week not only to win the Dell Match Play Championship but also to get back to number one in the world,” Day said.
He said the see-saw battle with McIlroy in the semi-final was nerve-wracking, but he drained a 13-foot par putt to halve the final hole and seal the victory. That match was all square through 11 when Day drove the green at the par-five 12th, winning the hole with a birdie then winning the 13th with a chip-in birdie.
McIlroy drained a 12-foot birdie putt to win the 14th, but couldn’t win another hole. “It was very stressful,” Day said. “There were moments where I think they’re the most fun, because I have to get up and hit the clutch putt at the right time. “I wasn’t as tight from tee to green as Rory was. I just kept on saying I’ve got to frustrate him with my short game. “If I miss a green I’ve got to get up and down. If I don’t hit a good chip then I’ve got to hole the putt.” 
McIlroy called it a “good quality match”. “I did miss a couple of opportunities on the front side,” McIlroy said. “He got off to a great start. I didn’t birdie 12 or 13, that was probably, I feel, what cost me the match. “From there I was really just battling back.”
Day, who confirmed his status as a Masters favorite with the first major of the year coming up in two weeks at Augusta National, said the same sharp short game that carried him to victory at Bay Hill was key in Austin. But the mind-set for match play versus stroke play was different. “You’re playing against a guy that’s across the tee from you,” Day said. “You have to know when and when not to go for things. When someone makes a mistake (you must) be able to aim it 20 feet from the pin and be able to hole the putt.”
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