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Patrick Dixon (Futurist Keynote Speaker)
1,695 followers -
Futurist keynote speaker, future trends, industry growth strategy, consultant and conference lecturer
Futurist keynote speaker, future trends, industry growth strategy, consultant and conference lecturer

1,695 followers
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Agile Retail - how to stay ahead - keynote speaker for Agile Business Conference
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I have worked with many of the largest banks and insurers in the world over the last 20 years, and all of them are focussed right now on the threat and opportunity of FinTech innovation.

That's one reason why FinTech is now one of the fastest growing areas of IT innovation with over $18bn invested a year.

In the first 3 months of 2017, Global FinTech startups raised $2.78n of investment from global venture capital firms, in 226 separate deals.

In London alone there are probably over 5,000 FinTech startups, many of them very new and very small - it is hard to keep track of the frenetic pace of change in this sector.

PwCs FinTech Report for 2017 suggests that 82% of banks expect to increase their FinTech partnerships in the next 3 years; 77% expect to adopt BlockChain as a key FinTech innovation and that these banks expect 20% return on investment per year, from FinTech. Over 80% fear that standalone FinTech companies could seize some of their business.

BlockChain is just one key example where investment is growing - $450m in 2017, up 45% in 12 months, with 70% of large banks planning to use BlockChain in at least one application by 2020.

Why is FinTech so important?

Very simply: FinTech will cause as radical changes to banking and payments as the web has caused to the whole of society.

FinTech combines all the power of the web, the potential of mobile transactions, the capabilities of cloud-computing, of Artificial Intelligence and Big Data analytics, a host of other tech like BitCoins and BlockChain, and all the potential of mega-sized IT platforms, to completely transform how money is stored and transferred, globally.

In the late 1990s we saw the dot-com boom - as our entire world began to embrace the power of the web. And with that came the explosion of e-commerce, together with massive growth in companies offering ways to sell online more efficiently, and to process online payments.

In the mid 2000s we saw a huge shift in web access globally from desktops to mobile devices. Part of the reason was massive growth of smartphone owners in emerging markets, who had never used a desktop to go online previously.

And the latest techno-boom is FinTech - anything and everything related to IT that enables banks to cut costs, act faster and earn more money.
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A few years ago, I gave a lecture to 500 generals, admirals and senior military personnel from the Pentagon (USPACOM).on how to reduce risks of future wars and reduce international tensions. It was one of the toughest assignments I can remember.

Our world spends over $1.8 trillion every year on weapons and other defence costs, or 2.5% of global GDP, down from 4% in the last days of the Cold War, equivalent to $250 per person on earth.

Combined sales of the largest 100 arms companies is around $320 billion a year - yet most of it is completely irrelevant to the conflicts of the future. So how do we ensure world peace?

A key theme of mine was how spending more on diplomacy and aid (and less on arms), would help build international trust. How multiple asymmetric conflicts will allow tiny number of people to humble, frighten and wear down very large nations. And how hybrid conflicts will make traditional troops and battle technology irrelevant.

Truth is our world is almost entirely at peace - for first time in generations

Here is a surprising fact: at the time of publishing this post - December 2017 - there is not a single example of a nation at war with another nation anywhere on earth - in the traditional sense. North and South Korea are technically at war - never declared peace - but the rest of the world is officially at peace.

That is strikingly different from popular perception - influenced by several complicated civil conflicts and border issues which dominate headlines each week in nations like Syria or Yemen or Sudan or Tunisia.

Here is an extract from The Future of Almost Everything - book published in 2015 - judge for yourself how good the predictions were...
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Massive risks of web disruption to entire nations by cutting undersea cables - hybrid war and conflicts
As I predicted in 2005, Ministry of Defence in UK today says it recognises massive risks that fishing trawlers or mini subs could be used by a hostile nation to cut every single internet cable from UK to rest of world - in minutes - resulting in economic pa...
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As I predicted in 2005, Ministry of Defence in UK today says it recognises massive risks that fishing trawlers or mini subs could be used by a hostile nation to cut every single internet cable from UK to rest of world - in minutes - economic paralysis.
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How to become a futurist - Patrick Dixon interview - his personal story - how to change organisations and some surprising things about the future digital world.
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SustainAgility - book on sustainability and green tech by Futurist keynote speaker Patrick Dixon and Johan Gorecki
Watch  Patrick Dixon , co-author of  Sustainagility book , keynote conference presentation at  Globe Forum  in Stockholm 2009, on Sustainagility issues. Also watch  Johan Gorecki  on Sustainagility themes and  innovation  awards -  here . Sustainagility  is...
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