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Bloomfield Avenue Dental Associates
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Before and After Cosmetic Bonding
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8/18/18
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Before and After Laser Treatment
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8/13/18
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Before and after laser treatment
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8/11/18
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Flashback Friday to Dr Barbosa’s recent trip to Italy with the University of Pennsylvania. To us, traveling isn’t just about time away from your regular life, the feeling of meeting new people and making new connections with men and women from around the world is so inspiring. It really helps open your mind to different perspectives and respect other cultures. Happy Friday!
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I challenge you to make a conversation with a stranger, you never know it might just make their day! #flashbackfriday #fbf #dentistry #travel
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Don’t Take a Vacation from Dental Hygiene this Summer

What are you most looking forward to this summer? Maybe you’re planning a trip to the beach, or a getaway in the woods…maybe even a journey to a faraway city or a foreign land. Wherever your holiday travel leads you, we hope it’s enjoyable and safe. And while you’re packing your bags, don’t forget to take a trio of important items that can help keep your vacation trouble-free: namely, a soft-bristled toothbrush, a tube of fluoride toothpaste, and a roll of dental floss.
If you have been careful about keeping up your oral hygiene all year, you’ve probably already noticed the rewards it can bring—like a sparkling smile, fresh breath, and good dental checkups. But even if you’re planning to get away from it all this summer, don’t take a vacation from oral hygiene. And if your oral hygiene routine could stand some improvement, maybe this is the time to make a fresh start.
Maintaining good oral health while you’re on the go doesn’t have to be a high-tech pursuit. You don’t need broadband service or a good mobile signal; you don’t even need electric power. Running water is nice, but not essential. And all the tools you need can fit easily in a travel bag.
The benefits of good oral hygiene are clear. Brushing twice every day and flossing once a day can effectively fight the bacteria that cause tooth decay and periodontal disease. That’s important any time of year, but perhaps even more so when you’re traveling because it’s harder to keep a healthy diet. Grabbing a sugary drink or a snack to go is convenient, but it provides food for the bacteria that can cause dental diseases; also, the acid in some soft drinks (even diet sodas) can wear away tooth enamel, leaving you with less protection against cavities.
Summer vacations can bring welcome surprises and unforgettable experiences. But needing urgent dental care in an unfamiliar place is the kind of surprise you can do without. So even though you may be far away from the routines of home, don’t take a vacation from your oral hygiene routine.  It takes just a few minutes, but it can keep your smile bright and healthy wherever you go.
If you would like more information about oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment. 610.284.4770
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As a hygienist, one of the most common areas I see being skipped when cleaning is your tongue! It is extremely important to effectively clean your tongue because it collects bacteria. Think of your tongue as a sponge, everything you eat and drink gets absorbed into it. Bacteria lives on the tongue and can cause plaque buildup. This leads to a discoloration and most often is one of the reasons for bad breath.
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I would recommend getting a tongue cleaner! Start at the back of the tongue cleaning back to front, rinse the tongue cleaner off in between with warm water and repeat until the tongue is clean. Do not brush too aggressively because you can damage your taste buds and make the tongue sore. You will want to replace your tongue cleaner just as often as your toothbrush!
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8/1/18
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Before and After Treatment...
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7/29/18
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Missing a few members, but our Bloomfield team enjoyed a delicious dinner at Ristorante Aroma. Such a great restaurant, the food and service were excellent!
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Certain factor may raise your risk and intensity of Gum Disease.

Periodontal (gum) disease is mainly caused by bacterial plaque built up on tooth surfaces due to ineffective oral hygiene. For most cases, treatment that includes plaque and calculus (tartar or calcified plaque) removal and renewed daily hygiene is highly effective in stopping the disease and restoring health to affected gum tissues.

However, you might have additional health factors that may make it more difficult to bring the disease under control. If your case is extreme, even the most in-depth treatment may only buy time before some or all of your teeth are eventually lost.

Genetics. Because of your genetic makeup, you could have a low resistance to gum disease and are more susceptible to it than other people. Additionally, if you have thin gum tissues, also an inherited trait, you could be more prone to receding gums as a result of gum disease.

Certain bacteria. Our mouths are home to millions of bacteria derived from hundreds of strains, of which only a few are responsible for gum disease. It’s possible your body’s immune system may find it difficult to control a particular disease-causing strain, regardless of your diligence in oral care.

Stress. Chronic stress, brought on by difficult life situations or experiences, can have a harmful effect on your body’s immune system and cause you to be more susceptible to gum disease. Studies have shown that as stress levels increase the breakdown of gum tissues (along with their detachment from teeth) may also increase.

Disease advancement. Gum disease can be an aggressive infection that can gain a foothold well before diagnosis. It’s possible, then, that by the time we begin intervention the disease has already caused a great deal of damage. While we may be able to repair much of it, it’s possible some teeth may not be salvageable.

While you can’t change genetic makeup or bacterial sensitivity, you can slow the disease progression and extend the life of your teeth with consistent daily hygiene, regular cleanings and checkups, and watching for bleeding, swollen gums and other signs of disease. Although these additional risk factors may make it difficult to save your teeth in the long-run, you may be able to gain enough time to prepare emotionally and financially for dental implants or a similar restoration.

If you would like more information on the treatment of gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. 610.284.4770
www.BloomfieldAveDental
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