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Cool Savannah Tours & Gifts
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If you’re fascinated by Savannah history, including its cemeteries, we encourage you to sign up for one – or both – of the following tours. The history and architecture tour of Savannah is a walking tour, while the ghost and graveyards tour of haunted Savannah is a trolley tour. Find more information here: http://coolsavannah.net/savannah-tours/
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Francis Bartow represented Georgia at a secession convention, passionately making the case for Georgia to secede, which happened in January 1861. He was then chosen to serve in the Provisional Confederate Congress, where he chaired the military affairs committee. It is believed that he “selected gray as the color for the Confederate uniforms.” Bartow was not in favor of electing Jefferson Davis (pictured) as the president of the Confederacy, preferring Howell Cobb. When that didn’t happen, he left the convention.
http://coolsavannah.net/general-francis-bartow-born-raised-buried-historic-savannah/
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Frances Bartow was born in Savannah on September 6, 1816 to Frances Lloyd Stebbins and Theodosius Bartow, and graduated from Franklin College (now known as the University of Georgia). He left the state to study at Yale University Law School and then learned the practical side of his profession in Savannah, working under John Macpherson Berrien (pictured), who served in the United States Senate and as an attorney general.
http://coolsavannah.net/general-francis-bartow-born-raised-buried-historic-savannah/
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“They have killed me, boys, but never give up the field.”

This quote may be Francis Stebbins Bartow’s most famous statement, one he allegedly made after being fatally wounded in the Civil War. But, who really was Bartow? What are his connections to historic Savannah? http://coolsavannah.net/general-francis-bartow-born-raised-buried-historic-savanna
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Starting in the 1820s, people began wanting to gather together signatures of all Declaration of Independence signers, and that’s when Button Gwinnett’s began going up in value. Fifty-one known examples of his signatures exist today, with about one fifth of them in private collections.His signature is considered more valuable than George Washington’s, Ben Franklin’s and Abraham Lincoln’s. In 2014, the last known sale of one of his signatures took place, and the price was $722,500. http://coolsavannah.net/button-gwinnett-crucial-role-histo…/
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Button Gwinnett was named commander of the Continental Battalion of Georgia in the early part of 1776. This was a controversial choice and, rather than that actually happening, he instead became an appointee to the Continental Congress. He left behind a bitter enemy in Lachlan McIntosh, who ended up commanding the battalion that originally selected Gwinnett as their leader.
http://coolsavannah.net/button-gwinnett-crucial-role-historic-savannah/
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Fifty-six men signed the Declaration of Independence, so why is Button Gwinnett’s signature so valuable? In part, it’s become some of the signers were well-known statesmen who regularly signed documents, whereas Gwinnett was not as prolific. Very few of his signatures therefore exist, pre-1776, according to HistoryBuff.com. And, because Gwinnett died in 1777, he “went from relative obscurity to signing the Declaration of Independence to death in about a year.”
http://coolsavannah.net/button-gwinnett-crucial-role-histo…/
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In 2012, a document containing the signature of Button Gwinnett was estimated to be worth $700,000-$800,000 – and so this is a reasonable question to ask: Who is Button Gwinnett and why is his signature so valuable? Well, the short answer is that he was one of only three men from Georgia who signed the Declaration of Independence. Here’s more a detailed answer.
http://coolsavannah.net/button-gwinnett-crucial-role-historic-savannah/
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By the time Laurel Grove Cemetery was founded, other Savannah cemeteries had been filled to the brim, including Colonial Park Cemetery. So, the city purchased part of the Springfield Plantation from the Stiles family to create the Laurel Grove Cemetery, and it became the most used one throughout the 19th century. When the Civil War hit, the plots in the North section filled up far too quickly, with about 1,500 Confederate soldiers now resting in the section devoted to deceased veterans of the era. These include eight generals, including Francis Bartow. http://coolsavannah.net/historic-savannah-cemeteries/
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The word “bonaventure” means “good fortune,” making it an unusual name of a cemetery – and that’s because it started out as a plantation owned by John Mullryne and Josiah Tattnall. Located three miles from Savannah, the property winds along the Wilmington River. Because of the property’s location, and the profusion of colorful azaleas and camellias, stately magnolias, live oaks, Spanish moss and dogwood, they named their 9,920 acres of land “Bonaventure.” There was quite a journey from this point to the city-owned cemetery of today! Find out more.
http://coolsavannah.net/historic-savannah-cemeteries/
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