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Christopher Klein
29 followers -
Author and freelance writer
Author and freelance writer

29 followers
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The Irish invasion of Canada is coming on March 12.

Put down the alarm bells and muskets. On March 12, Doubleday will be releasing my new book on the self-proclaimed Irish Republican Army, which undertook one of the most fantastical missions in military history--to seize the British province of Canada and hold it hostage until the independence of Ireland was secured.

A crazy idea like that would never work, right? Well, no. No, it didn't.
However, these Irish Americans who fled the Great Hunger and fought on both sides of the Civil War came closer to success than you might have thought. And they forged a trans-Atlantic network that would eventually contribute to Ireland's freedom.

Plus, it's one rollicking story.

Until December 10, Goodreads members can enter a giveaway to win one of 10 copies of WHEN THE IRISH INVADED CANADA: The Incredible True Story of the Civil War Veterans Who Fought for Ireland's Freedom. Click here to enter: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40640782-when-the-irish-invaded-canada
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On a sunny winter day some three centuries ago, British warships fired their cannons in celebration as Lieutenant Robert Maynard sailed up the James River upon his return to Virginia. Any questions as to the success of his covert mission to subdue one of history’s most notorious pirates were answered at the sight of the pungent trophy dangling from the bowsprit of Maynard’s ship—the severed, decomposing head of Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard. Click below to read the story of how Blackbeard ended up literally losing his head.

https://www.history.com/news/blackbeard-pirate-killed?fbclid=IwAR3T7SAULu41SpA6OslIMhEfsIBwfQrXh1wGVMwZuFU2-agpXT9JHsu31q0
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Fifty years ago, a group of whiz kids from MIT used a mainframe computer as big as an elevator, messengers stationed at pay phones, and a pair of subway tokens to stage a wild race against time under the streets of New York City.
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In the early 1960s, 13 trailblazing American women participated in a secret program to become America’s first female astronaut. Although the skilled pilots passed the same physiological screening tests given to the Mercury Seven astronauts, NASA abruptly shuttered the little-known Woman in Space Program before its participants could ever leave the ground. The “Mercury 13” may have had the right stuff, but for NASA they were the wrong gender.
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Vere St. Leger Goold not only had a killer backhand, he was also a true killer. A Wimbledon finalist in 1879, the Irish aristocrat made headlines around the world in 1907 when a rich dowager’s dismembered body was found inside his luggage. The ensuing trial would be dubbed “The Monte Carlo Trunk Murder.”
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Born 200 years ago today in Concord, Massachusetts, Henry David Thoreau is noted for living in self-sufficient isolation amid the woods of Walden Pond. But did you know that a year before building his cabin, the famous American environmentalist accidentally started a forest fire that nearly burned the Concord woods to the ground?
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As the Cold War heated up in the 1950s, the U.S. government devised top-secret plans to ensure its survival if the Soviet Union launched a nuclear attack. These “Continuity of Government” preparations included building dozens of underground bunkers and arranging to move high-ranking government officials out of harm’s way. From a White House at sea to a subterranean capitol at a posh resort, learn more about seven of these doomsday plans.
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“It seems that I have always been ahead of my time,” Serbian-American engineer and physicist Nikola Tesla once mused. While the eccentric inventor pioneered advances in radio, television, motors, robotics and electricity—including the alternating-current technology that’s widely used today—he also proposed more outlandish ideas. Six futuristic visions of his that have yet to come to fruition, either because of limitations of technology or market viability, include an earthquake machine, a camera that could photograph thoughts, wireless energy, an artificial tidal wave, a supersonic airship, and a "death beam."
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As members of President George Washington’s cabinet, Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson often butted heads over their competing visions for the United States. While Hamilton sought a strong federal government and an economy based on banking and industry, Jefferson championed the role of the states and republican ideals. It’s a debate that endures to this very day. So whose American vision has come closest to its fulfillment?
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Happy Flag Day! When Alaska and Hawaii were being considered for admission to the United States in the 1950s, thousands of Americans sent their redesign proposals to the federal government. These 10 rejected ideas were among the most creative submissions. As a geography junkie, I kind of like #6.
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