Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Ron Villejo
1,045 followers -
{where art crosses boundaries}
{where art crosses boundaries}

1,045 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
In a recent film Duilian (2016), Tsang similarly blurs fantasy and reality to explore the gap between the well-known public persona of Qui Jin, an early twentieth-century revolutionary Chinese poet, and the obscurity of her personal life and sexuality. The film imagines Qui Jin’s relationship with her female friend and calligrapher, Wu Zhiying, as an intimate love affair. They converse using Qui Jin’s poems, many of which were translated into English for the first time for this project, but their moments of idyll and fantasy are intercut with jarring yet beautiful scenes of wushu martial arts.

MacArthur Foundation
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I really just try to say what I feel needs to be said, in the way that I need to say it, and I find that the work finds itself out into the world, where it needs to go.

~Wu Tsang
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
For the one-woman show Bronx Gothic (2014), she draws upon the disparate storytelling traditions of Victorian epistolary novels and West African griot poets. As Okpokwasili reads from a series of intimate notes exchanged by two black girls navigating the early years of adolescence in the 1980s, her body shudders, buckles, and slams to the floor. Through the intensity and duration of her movements, her body becomes, in effect, the medium through which long-buried experiences—of friendship, sexual awakening, daydreams, and nightmares—are conjured and shared.

MacArthur Foundation
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This fellowship gives me more courage, and it gives me more hope that I will never be satisfied and I will never be done.

~Okwui Okpokwasili
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Music features prominently throughout The Detroit Project, with Motown, jazz, and hip-hop tracks serving to accentuate a mood and underscore dialogue, while Morisseau captures the city’s distinctive rhythms of speech to further convey the specificity of place.

MacArthur Foundation
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I try to listen to the everyday language of the working people, and I try to capture the poetry of our everydayness.

~Dominique Morisseau
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Link is committed to helping other writers chart their own course, much as she did; with her husband, Gavin Grant, she runs the Small Beer Press, which publishes unique voices in fantasy and literary fiction that do not appeal to commercial publishers. As a writer and an editor, Link is mapping new literary territory, and she is a source of inspiration for many young writers dissatisfied with traditional distinctions between genres.

MacArthur Foundation
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
You don't pick up a ghost story because you think it's going to be important. You pick it up because you think it's going to make you feel a certain way.

~Kelly Link
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
In “Rivers,” Keene imagines two meetings between an older Huckleberry Finn and a now-free Jim; he endows Jim with a voice and consciousness, thereby presenting Tom Sawyer and Huck from a powerful new perspective that extends and transforms Twain’s original novels.

MacArthur Foundation
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
They do often focus on people who have not been represented in history ... give those voices space in fiction, so they can reach the wider world.

~John Keene
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded