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Kelly Brindley
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Managing Director of Ignition Driving School.com Ltd
Managing Director of Ignition Driving School.com Ltd

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Ignition Driving School is delighted to welcome Anthony to its team if driving instructors. Anthony will be serving the local community of Stockport and South West Manchester and is available to teach 8am - 8pm 7 days a week. Lesson prices are £20 per hour but block booking deals are available. Intensive driving courses are also on offer in the Stockport area with waiting times for driving tests at the Bredbury test centre being just 3 weeks. Welcome on board! :)

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It has recently been reported that a 28 year old woman has now failed her theory test a staggering 110 times, spending £3,410 in the process. With the practical test element still to do and all the driving lessons on top, this candidate will have spent a small fortune before she finally gets her driving license. She's not alone though in struggling to get through the theory test, in fact many candidates fail to pass it on their first attempt, so what is the key to passing it? 

The theory test comprises of 2 elements; the multiple choice test and the hazard perception test, and you need to pass both elements to pass the theory test overall. To pass the multiple choice part of the test you need to have a good understanding of road procedures, situations and the law, and the pass mark is 43 out of 50. Candidates fail this element of the theory test because they rely on revision aids such as discs that supply questions and give the answers, so the candidate learns the answers by rote and doesn't thoroughly understand the reasons behind the answer. However, the theory test encompasses many different aspects of driving including; driving abroad, breakdowns and emergencies, accidents, road signs and automatic transmission cars. There is even a section on documents and procedures. In other words many sections covered by the theory test are not topics covered by general driving lessons and need to be read up about, and it is important not just for passing the theory test but for driving safely for life. It is much better therefore, to purchase a book or app that details the various topics covered by the theory test and for the candidate to absorb the information and understand it. Publications written by the DVSA (formerly the DSA) are the best to get as it is this agency that writes the test and so you know that the topic has been covered in their literature.

The hazard perception test consists of 14 video clips, each lasting a minute long. During the clip you will see a hazard develop and you have a window of opportunity to spot the hazard and click the mouse to register having seen it. The sooner you spot the hazard and click the mouse, the more points you will score. One clip however has 2 hazards, so overall there are 15 hazards to spot so you need to pay attention. If the computer detects rhythmic clicking or if you click outside the window of opportunity you will score 0 (zero) for that clip so you need to be careful. To pass this element of the theory test you need to score 44 out of 75. Common sense helps you get through this part of the test. Think first of all about the scene you are watching, is it a busy street? Countryside? Dual carriageway? What sort of hazards would you expect to see in those scenarios? On a busy street you might expect to see car doors opening, people walking out from between cars and so on. Once you know the scenario you can start to scan the video for potential hazards and click the mouse when you see a situation develop. Don't be afraid to click the mouse more than once, you need to be sure that you have clicked within the window of opportunity so click a couple of times to be sure. The best way to prepare for the hazard perception element of the test is to practice hazard spotting when either a passenger in a car or whilst on a driving lesson. Start to focus on things further down the road, scan your eyes across the road and spot any potential hazardous situations. You can also buy discs with hazard perception clips to practice.

Good preparation is key to passing the theory and hazard perception tests. Treat it like any other exam and study the material well. You are going to be driving a car for many years to come and you need to understand the road procedures, systems and the law. It is vital therefore, that you understand the subject before taking your practical test and driving on your own for the rest of your life.

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It has recently been reported that a 28 year old woman has now failed her theory test a staggering 110 times, spending £3,410 in the process. With the practical test element still to do and all the driving lessons on top, this candidate will have spent a small fortune before she finally gets her driving license. She's not alone though in struggling to get through the theory test, in fact many candidates fail to pass it on their first attempt, so what is the key to passing it? 

The theory test comprises of 2 elements; the multiple choice test and the hazard perception test, and you need to pass both elements to pass the theory test overall. To pass the multiple choice part of the test you need to have a good understanding of road procedures, situations and the law, and the pass mark is 43 out of 50. Candidates fail this element of the theory test because they rely on revision aids such as discs that supply questions and give the answers, so the candidate learns the answers by rote and doesn't thoroughly understand the reasons behind the answer. However, the theory test encompasses many different aspects of driving including; driving abroad, breakdowns and emergencies, accidents, road signs and automatic transmission cars. There is even a section on documents and procedures. In other words many sections covered by the theory test are not topics covered by general driving lessons and need to be read up about, and it is important not just for passing the theory test but for driving safely for life. It is much better therefore, to purchase a book or app that details the various topics covered by the theory test and for the candidate to absorb the information and understand it. Publications written by the DVSA (formerly the DSA) are the best to get as it is this agency that writes the test and so you know that the topic has been covered in their literature.

The hazard perception test consists of 14 video clips, each lasting a minute long. During the clip you will see a hazard develop and you have a window of opportunity to spot the hazard and click the mouse to register having seen it. The sooner you spot the hazard and click the mouse, the more points you will score. One clip however has 2 hazards, so overall there are 15 hazards to spot so you need to pay attention. If the computer detects rhythmic clicking or if you click outside the window of opportunity you will score 0 (zero) for that clip so you need to be careful. To pass this element of the theory test you need to score 44 out of 75. Common sense helps you get through this part of the test. Think first of all about the scene you are watching, is it a busy street? Countryside? Dual carriageway? What sort of hazards would you expect to see in those scenarios? On a busy street you might expect to see car doors opening, people walking out from between cars and so on. Once you know the scenario you can start to scan the video for potential hazards and click the mouse when you see a situation develop. Don't be afraid to click the mouse more than once, you need to be sure that you have clicked within the window of opportunity so click a couple of times to be sure. The best way to prepare for the hazard perception element of the test is to practice hazard spotting when either a passenger in a car or whilst on a driving lesson. Start to focus on things further down the road, scan your eyes across the road and spot any potential hazardous situations. You can also buy discs with hazard perception clips to practice.

Good preparation is key to passing the theory and hazard perception tests. Treat it like any other exam and study the material well. You are going to be driving a car for many years to come and you need to understand the road procedures, systems and the law. It is vital therefore, that you understand the subject before taking your practical test and driving on your own for the rest of your life.
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Google is continuing to expand its reach into our lives by exploring and demonstrating new uses of its growing technological capability. Google Glass is perhaps its most high profile invention and the company is now setting its sights on personal mobility, demonstrating a prototype of its new driverless car in California. For many this is an enticing glimpse of the future, the ultimate in stress free commuting – just get in the car, use your smart phone to tell the car where you want to go, and then sit back and relax while the car takes you to your destination. Google argues that aside from convenience, the greatest benefit will be to road safety as the element of human error is removed.

However, there are still many obstacles to overcome. Currently, driverless cars are illegal almost everywhere in the world although some states in the US are legislating to change this. To work effectively driverless and conventional vehicles will have to be able to work effectively together – imagine a situation where its not clear who has right of way, say on a road narrowed by parked cars. Humans can (usually!) use compromise, logic and judgment to find a mutually beneficial solution. What if one of the cars is driverless and the other has a driver – how do they communicate and act safely? And what if a driverless car has an accident? Who’s fault is it – the passenger (no driver remember!), the manufacturer of the car, the author of the software? Imagine the product liability implications! All of these questions and many more need to be addressed before the vision becomes a reality. Perhaps we will end up with a situation like we find in the airline industry. Passenger jets can now take off, fly and land themselves. However each aircraft still has two fully qualified pilots to ensure safety and passenger confidence. We may still require drivers to be trained and qualified, even if they don’t always do the driving themselves. Either way it seems likely that google’s vision is many years away from an everyday reality for most of us.

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Our new intensive driving course website has gone live today! :-)  Ignition Driving School offers a flexible approach to intensive driving courses and can help pupils no matter what stage of the learning to drive process they are at. All intensive driving courses are done locally to the pupil and at their local test centre with a fully qualified driving instructor. For more info you can go to...    #drivinglessons
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Our new intensive driving course website has gone live today! :-)  Ignition Driving School offers a flexible approach to intensive driving courses and can help pupils no matter what stage of the learning to drive process they are at. All intensive driving courses are done locally to the pupil and at their local test centre with a fully qualified driving instructor. For more info you can go to...    #drivinglessons

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Happy Birthday Ignition Driving School - 9 years old today! :-)
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