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Thread Check Inc.
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How to Use Thread Plug Gages

Go and no go thread plug gages are very easy to use. The user must first select the correct size thread plug gages for the corresponding externally threaded product. Thread plug gages should be clearly labeled on the handle but also on the gage members when possible. This is obviously critical but sometimes difficult as drawings and specification requirements are frequently missing, incomplete, or incorrect. The user of the thread plug gages should ensure that the correct major diameter, TPI/pitch, Class of fit, and any special pitch diameters are clearly specified. The user should also confirm that the gages conform to the proper national or international standard. In the USA it is commonly assumed that metric thread plug gages conform to the ANSI/ASME B1.16M but this may not be the case particularly when working with an international customer or a globally recognized company with manufacturing facilities located in the USA and engineering located in Asia or Europe. Other metric standards like ISO or JIS may be required. It is also important to confirm that pitch diameters on the gages match the part specification. For example a part gaged prior to plating will have special pitch diameters. The thread plug gages selected should be engineered and made correctly to the preplate or before plate pitch diameters. Thread plug gages should be marked with B/P or P/P designation for quick and easy identification. Finally the inspector should confirm the gages are calibrated. It is always advisable to recheck the thread plug gages prior to use regardless of the calibration sticker’s current status. Many companies arbitrarily select annual frequencies of calibration rather than basing frequency on usage. This can be dangerous as thread plug gages can be worn out of tolerance or damaged during the course of a production run. Thread Measuring wires or a 3-Wire Thread Measuring System can accurately measure pitch diameter and confirm the thread plug gage is still within tolerance. The best thread plug gaging practice utilizes several sets of thread plug gages. One or two gages can be used for in process inspection while another gage can be used for final inspection and a master thread plug gage retained for dispute in the event that gages fail to correlate on acceptance or rejection.
AGD thread plug gages are designed with a chip groove for sizes above .164” (#8). The chip grooves purpose is to clean the threads of the work piece but it should really not be relied on. It is highly recommended that the work piece be as clean and burr free as possible to reduce friction and wear on the gage. A clean thread prior to gaging will provide the inspector with more sensitivity of thread fit. Thread plug gages should be cleaned with solvent or air and then frequently recoated with a rust preventative/gage preservative. In clean room environments Isopropyl alcohol may be substituted to help reduce friction on the gages. Thread plug gages should be protected in plastic tubes or coated in wax when not in use to prevent nicks to the threads. All gauging whenever possible should be done over an inspection table in the event that the gage is accidentally dropped. If a gage is dropped it should be immediately re-inspected for damage.

The go thread plug gage should engage the internal threaded part with very little force used. The engagement should be smooth. There is no specification regarding torque or pounds of pressure for using thread plug gages. Common sense should be applied based on factors of thread size, pitch, and application. If the gage starts to bind, the inspector should stop before damaging the part or the gage. The part may be undersized or tapered. Other possibilities include lead error or a damaged thread. With fine threads the inspector should be careful to not cross thread the parts.

It is important to use the no go gage as it checks pitch diameter exclusively. It is unaffected by other conditions in the screw thread as it is intentionally truncated on the crests and with greater clearance applied on the roots of the thread. The no go thread plug should not enter the part more than 3 turns although in practice it is advisable to limit the amount of turns to 1 ½ - 2 turns max. The user just simply counts turns. The end user should review the applicable thread specification in detail as there are variations to the above practice. http://www.threadcheck.com/no-go-gaging-per-ansi-asme-b1.2-1983-an-american-national-standard/technicalinfo/.

http://www.threadcheck.com/unified-inch-thread-gages/

Thread Check Inc.
info@threadcheck.com
www.threadcheck.com
631-231-1515
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2016-06-30
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Thread Check Inc., is proud to announce the release of our 2016 Precision Gage Solutions catalog with over 180 pages of precision gages, measuring instruments and technical information. Our new catalog is available for download or in an electronic book format for easy use. The new catalog has links to www.threadcheck.com where our customers can shop on line, request quotes and view hundreds of technical articles. Use the table of contents to quickly turn to the product selection of your choice. Use electronic book marks for the pages you visit frequently. The new electronic catalog works across all platforms including tables and smart phone.

<iframe frameborder="0" src="http://user-CfZTcuf.cld.bz/e/Thread-Check-Inc-Catalog-2016?mode=page" title="Thread Check Inc. Catalog 2016"
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Go and no go thread ring gages are very easy to use. The user must first select the correct size thread ring gages for the corresponding externally threaded product. This is obviously critical but sometimes difficult as drawings and specification requirements are frequently missing, incomplete, or incorrect. The user of the thread ring gages should ensure that the correct major diameter, TPI/pitch, Class of fit, and any special pitch diameters are clearly specified. The user should also confirm that the gages conform to the proper national or international standard. In the USA it is commonly assumed that metric thread gages conform to the ANSI/ASME B1.16M but this may not be the case particularly when working with an international customer or a globally recognized company with manufacturing facilities located in the USA and engineering located in Asia or Europe. Other metric standards like ISO or JIS may be required. It is also important to confirm that pitch diameters on the gages match the part specification. For example a part gaged prior to plating will have special pitch diameters. The thread ring gages selected should be engineered and made correctly to the preplate or before plate pitch diameters. The thread ring gages should be marked with B/P or P/P designation for quick and easy identification. Finally the inspector should confirm the gages are calibrated. It is always advisable to recheck the thread ring gages prior to use with the matching set plug regardless of the calibration sticker’s current status. Many companies arbitrarily select annual frequencies of calibration rather than basing frequency on usage. This can be dangerous as thread ring gages can be worn out of tolerance or damaged during the course of a production run. The best thread ring gaging practice utilizes several sets of thread ring gages all set to a matching master set plug gage. One or two sets can be used for in process inspection while another set can be used for final inspection and a master set retained for dispute in the event that gages fail to correlate.

Adjustable American Gage Design - AGD thread ring gages are designed with radial slots which form natural dirt grooves that tend to clean the threads of the work piece. It is important to note that thread ring gages are not work dies. It is advisable to clean the work piece prior to gauging as this will extend the wear life of the thread ring gages. Thread ring gages should be cleaned with solvent or air and then frequently recoated with a rust preventative/gage preservative. Thread ring gages should be laid flat to prevent them from rolling off a table. All gauging whenever possible should be done over an inspection table in the event that the gage is accidentally dropped. If a gage is dropped it should be immediately re-inspected with a matching set plug. Any impact to the thread ring gages may result in a change to its size.

The go thread ring gage should engage the externally threaded part with very little force used. The engagement should be smooth. There is no specification regarding torque or pounds of pressure for using thread ring gages. Common sense should be applied based on factors of thread size, pitch, and application. If the gage starts to bind, the inspector should stop before damaging the part or the gage. The part may be oversized or tapered. Other possibilities include lead error or a damaged thread. An inspector can evaluate the critical elements of the threaded part by inspecting the major diameter using a measuring instrument such as a micrometer. Pitch diameter may be checked by using a 3-wire method. Lead, angle and minor diameter can be checked with an optical comparator or vision system. With fine threads the inspector should be careful to not cross thread the parts.

It is important to use the no go gage as it checks pitch diameter exclusively. It is unaffected by other conditions in the screw thread as it is intentionally truncated on the crests and with greater clearance applied on the roots of the thread. The no go thread plug should not enter the part more than 3 turns although in practice it is advisable to limit the amount of turns to 1 ½ - 2 turns max. The user just simply counts turns. The end user should review the applicable thread specification in detail as there are variations to the above practice. http://www.threadcheck.com/no-go-gaging-per-ansi-asme-b1.2-1983-an-american-national-standard/technicalinfo/.

http://blog.threadcheck.com/properly-use-go-…hread-ring-gages/2016/06/ ‎

Thread Check Inc.
info@threadcheck.com
www.threadcheck.com
631-231-1515
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Southern Style Thread Ring Gages

The Southern Adjustable Style thread Ring Gage features an adjustment mechanism that maintains the roundness integrity of the gage throughout its use. The helix path of the thread along the line of adjustment remains true and in alignment throughout the life of the gage. Aluminum gage bodies anodized green for Go and red for NoGo provide easy identification. Precision ground thread inserts are made of oil hardened tool steel. Thread class and tolerances conform to ASME/ANSI B1.2 or B1.16M. Sizes below .2500 and M6 are counterbored to hold specific length.

http://www.threadcheck.com/southern-style-thread-ring-gages-unified-inch-steel/unified-inch-thread-gages/

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All Thread Check Inc. thread ring gages are root relieved for longer gage life and more accurate gaging. The gages are manufactured with a root clearance in the major diameter which eliminates the possibility of interfearence from the full form section of the thread setting plug and major diameter of the part being gaged. This critical feature assures that the thread flanks are making proper contact.

http://www.threadcheck.com/0-80-unf-2a-go-ring-gage/unified-inch-thread-gages/

http://www.threadcheck.com/m16-x-35-6g-go-thread-ring-gage/unified-metric-thread-gages/
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Thread Check's gear measuring wires are used to check the tooth thickness of gears at the pitch diameter. The gear wire method is more accurate than using tooth verniers to measure the tooth thickness. A measurement over the wires using a micrometer is compared with a perfect gear which is obtainable from the Van Keuren Handbook No 37. The Van Keuren Gear Measurement Tables are accurate to .0001" for 1 diametral pitch gears. A value based on the selection of pressure angle, number of teeth, and wire size is divided by the diametral pitch of the gear being measured. If the actual measurement is larger than the table value then the teeth are thick. If the value is smaller then the teeth are considered thin. A copy of the Van Keuren Handbook can be purchased on line at http://www.threadcheck.com/industrial-publications/.
Thread Check's gear measuring wires are supplied in sets of 2 identical wires. Thread Check's gear measuring wires meet or exceed Federal Specification GGG-W-366B for Grade AMGW. Wires are lapped  to RMS micro inch finish or less. Contact Thread Check Inc for modified gear wires, carbide gear wires, flatted gear wires.
Thread Check offers Gear measuring holders for both 2 and 3 wire gear applications. Please provide measuring instrument and spindle diameter when ordering.

http://www.threadcheck.com/thread-and-gear-measuring-wires/
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UNR Screw Thread Form
The UNR thread was developed for fatigue resistant safety critical fasteners during the 1950s.
The UNR thread form applies only to external threads. Its design form is the same as that of the external UN thread except that the root is required to be rounded. UNR threads are applied most often to high volume commercial fastener threads produced by rolling
Per ANSI/ASME B1.12003 – paragraph 2.3.1: “The rounded root (UNR Thread)…reduces the rate of threading tool crest wear and improves fatigue strength over that of a flat root (UN) thread.”
Thread Designations:
UN = Basic Unified National thread series
UNR = Basic Unified National thread series with external thread controlled root radius
UNS = Special Unified National thread series
UNRS = Special Unified National thread series with external thread controlled root radius
UNC = Unified National Coarse thread series
UNRC = Unified National Coarse thread series with external thread controlled root radius
UNF = Unified National Fine thread series
UNRF = Unified National Fine thread series with external thread controlled root radius
UNEF = Unified National Extra Fine thread series
UNREF = Unified National Extra Fine thread series with external thread controlled root radius
External UNR threads per ANSI/ASME B1.1
paragraph 1.3: UNR threads have "a rounded root contour" at the minor diameter.
paragraph 2.3.1(a): "The root contour ... shall have a smooth, continuous, non-reversing contour with a radius of curvature not less than 0.10825318P at any point and shall blend tangentially into the flanks and any straight segment. At the maximum-material condition, the point of tangency shall be at a distance not less than 0.625H below the basic major diameter.”
For internal threads there is no UNR requirement. Use a standard UN thread plug gage.
THREAD RING GAGES:

The difference between a UNR and UN thread ring gage is marking only. The thread ring gages are identical. Although Thread Check Inc. can mark thread ring gages with the R designation, it is not a standard requirement. Use the same ring gages to check either the UNR or UN screw thread form. The amount of radius at the root of the UNR thread form is too small to require a modification of the standard UN thread form ring gages.

UNR Inspection Method for External Root Radius:
• Optical Comparator or Vision System
• Tri Roll thread comparator with minor diameter type 7 rolls ( 55° included angle ). The Tri Roll thread comparator may be more practical in a high volume production environment 

Visit www.threadcheck.com
Comments or questions regarding this article may be sent to techsupport@threadcheck.com

http://www.threadcheck.com/unr-screw-thread-form/technicalinfo/
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No Go Taperlock Style Thread Plug Gage 
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Customer Question:
We run different size EUE threads (3.5-8rd pre API 5B, 2.88-10 EUE). My question is there a chart that can be displayed so that operators know what is the +- rotation on the gage they are using?
Is that something you mark on your gages?

Thread Check Answer:
The tolerances on P,P1 and A for 8 round tubing (EUE) are ± 1 turn. That information is on page 38 of API STD 5B. Thread Check's plug gages have scribed lines showing the standoff limits.  The rings are to be flush ±1 turn from the small end of the product.  (shown on page 40 of API STD 5B.

For questions contact info@threadcheck.com

http://www.threadcheck.com/nc77-if-ring-gage/api-gages/

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Standard tolerances for thread working gages, thread setting plug gages, and thread setting ring gages ae defined as either class X or class W:

W tolerances represent the highest grade of accuracy and workmanship and are specified for thread setting plug and ring gages only. Class X tolerance gages are larger than W tolerances. X tolerance gages are used to inspect product.

Contrary to the ANSI/ASME Thread Standards, most gage manufactures in the United States will supply a thread setting plug gage with a class X tolerance on pitch diameter. Class W tolerance setplug gages are priced on request. This practice has become known as the industry standard.

http://www.threadcheck.com/thread-gages-gauges/

info@threadcheck.com
631 231 1515
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