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The Cosmetic Chemist LLC
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The Cosmetic Chemist - Molecule of the Week - Ascorbic Acid

Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant that is found naturally in many fruits and vegetables. Numerous studies have demonstrated the positive health benefits of ascorbic acid in the topical treatment of skin. Mostly, this is in the context of the prevention of erythema, photoaging, and photoimmunosuppression. In addition, ascorbic acid has anti-tyrosinase activity, which has lead to its use in skin whitening preparations.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/molecule_of_the_week/ascorbic_acid.html
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Thermal Styling: A Look at Hair Shaft Deficiencies Caused by Excessive Use of Thermal Styling Appliances

By Toni Woodard

Thermal styling is a very common practice among women due to the many benefits that it provides. Many women with textured hair know that if heat is used on their hair, there is a possibility that when the hair is washed again some of the hair may not revert completely back to its original curl pattern. The curls may actually be looser with stray fibers becoming quite unruly as result of the heat damage. Even more serious, there are other common conditions that can afflict hair due to thermal exposure, especially if heating appliances are used excessively or improperly. Three conditions that can result from excessive thermal exposure are trichoptilosis, acquired trichorrhexis nodosa, and bubble hair.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/education/hair_care_technology/thermal_styling_a_look_at_hair_shaft_deficiencies.html
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Human Skin Can "See" Light with Opsins

By Denise Falcone, Irene Castellano Pellicena, and Natallia E. Uzunbajakava

Phototransduction is the mechanism whereby photons are ‘received’ by a photoreceptor and converted into a cellular response. In humans, the most well-known example of phototransduction is the image forming process of human vision, in which photons interact with light-sensitive opsin family proteins. Until recently, phototransduction in humans was exclusively attributed to the cells of the vision system. New evidence described the existence of melanopsin acting as a non-image forming photoreceptor in the retina, and considered to have light-regulated tasks. Likewise, another opsin (peropsin) was identified in human ocular tissues and hypothesized to play a role in the retinal pigment epithelium. As for tissues outside the visual system, expression of several types of opsins in humans was reported in the skin, hair follicles, and resident cells among other tissues.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/education/skin_science/skin_hair_and_other_non-visual_tissues.html
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Molecule of the Week - Pogostone

Pogostone is one of the key components of patchouli oil, which is the essential oil of the aerial part (Pogostemonis herba) of the herbaceous plant, Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth. It is used in traditional Chinese and Indian (Ayurveda) medicine to treat a variety of ailments and symptoms including dampness, diarrhea, dermatitis, fever, and vomiting as well as to help stimulate appetite.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/molecule_of_the_week/pogostone.html
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IP Strategies in the Cosmetic Industry

By Peter D. Sleman

A sound intellectual property strategy can add value to any business, generate revenue streams, and act as an additional bargaining chip in negotiations. However, it is often difficult for businesses and inventors to figure out how to reduce their IP costs without sacrificing quality. Below are some practical pointers to consider when formulating your IP strategy. These will serve as a primer to help you ask the right questions.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/education/career_corner/ip_strategies_in_the_cosmetic_industry.html
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Know Your Skin Cells: II. The Keratinocytes

By Gopinathan K. Menon

The keratinocyte (a cell that synthesizes keratin proteins) is the predominant cell in the epidermis (the layer of skin that overlays the dermis), which itself is divided into various strata: stratum basale (basal layer), stratum spinosum (spinous or prickly layer), stratum granulosum (granular layer), and the stratum corneum (corneous layer). Cells of the basal layer divide and move upwards, progressively differentiating (synthesizing various keratins and lipids) and passing through the other layers described above, finally ending up as cornified cells that provide the skin with a physical and chemical barrier.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/education/skin_science/know_your_skin_cells_the_keratinocytes.html
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TheCosmeticChemist.com - Molecule of the Week - Equol

Equol is an isoflavanoid that has antioxidant, extracellular matrix enhancing, and phytoestrogenic properties. A considerable amount of research has gone into understanding its anti-aging properties in human skin. Equol is a metabolic product of daidzein—an isoflavone found in soybeans—which is metabolized by intestinal bacteria. Equol is also found in beans, cabbage, lettuce, and other plant species.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/molecule_of_the_week/equol.html
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Glycerol as a Smart Moisturizer

By Gopinathan K. Menon

We all know that glycerol (glycerine) is great for our skin in winter. Many skincare products that have superb feel and moisturizing properties contain this time-tested ingredient. This ingredient is also made by your skin through the breakdown of oils by enzymes in the skin. Its production is one of the key functions of the oil glands (sebaceous glands) of skin, helping to keep skin hydrated.

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/education/skin_science/glycerol_as_a_smart_moisturizer.html
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Consumer Perception of the Cosmetic Industry

By Louise Hidinger

Gaining consumer trust and loyalty is a major issue for any industry, but particularly the cosmetics industry. Cosmetics use and manufacture is deeply entwined with the frailty of the human condition. Taking advantage of this, the history of cosmetics is littered with examples of harmless “hope in a jar” at best, and toxic concoctions at worst. Over the past decade, the negative perception of the cosmetics industry has greatly increased. During this time, the cosmetics industry has come under fire from environmental groups, who have successfully played on consumer fears, by portraying conventional cosmetics and personal care products as being “dirty”, contaminated with toxins, carcinogens, and endocrine disruptors. In light of these issues, how is the cosmetics industry currently perceived by consumers?

Read the full article at: http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/education/career_corner/consumer_perception_of_the_cosmetic_industry.html
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The Cosmetic Chemist - Molecule of the Week - Allantoin

Historically, allantoin was used to promote wound healing and treat skin ulcers. Nowadays, it is well recognized that allantoin has keratolytic properties in which it facilitates the desquamation of the stratum corneum. One of the key benefits of allantoin, in respect to other desquamation agents, is that it is non-irritating to the skin.

Read the full article at http://www.thecosmeticchemist.com/molecule_of_the_week/allantoin.html
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