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Nollind Whachell
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By Nollind Whachell | Using Creativity to Connect, Empower, & Inspire in the 21st Century
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Probably one of the best articles that explains my frustration with WordPress and why I'm actively seeking another platform (such as The Grid). To put this into another perspective, it unable to flexibly adapt, as noted below.

“The reason it’s not a good thing is because your data is now tied to your theme. It is not portable.”

“When we talk about ‘data portability’ in the WordPress community, we’re primarily talking about being able to keep and access your data regardless of the theme you’re using.”

“What happens when you switch to a theme without the same, exact post type defined? Suddenly, you can no longer access your portfolio. It doesn’t show on your site. Your portfolio items aren’t in the admin. They simply disappeared.”
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“...their advice to move, rather than think...”

Do you see a difference between these two quotes below? The article is saying they are worlds apart but I see very little difference.

“Success, in this worldview, often entails mimicking the lean startup, strategically maneuvering with nimbleness and flexibility.”

“When you have a well-crafted corporate theory, it becomes clearer to you what your next strategic move or competitive advantage will be. Each of these moves can be seen as a test of your theory. If the move works out and creates value, then the theory it tests is validated.”

In effect, from my perspective, testing a theory is still a trial of that theory and that theory may still be in error. Thus you're still learning through failure and flexibly adapting your next move based upon the greater vision of where you want to be.

All said and done though, it appears the articles key contention is an assumption that people doing agile development work are basically running around, bumping blindly into walls, until they figure something out. While I'm not an expert on agile development, I kind of highly doubt that. I'm assuming they have a greater vision and belief of where they want to go but also a practicality of needing to start somewhere to get there. In effect, it can't be all theory without action.

And as the article states as well, it can't be all action without theory and deep thought either. This mirrors what I've said before about creativity being an alignment of your inner and outer worlds. It starts with deep reflective thought internally and then by taking action on those thoughts externally. But again, the article assumes that agile development is all action and no reflective thought which I kind of highly doubt. 
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”To effectively lead you must first take the time to truly know the person… and then adapt how you lead to the interests, needs, and goals of that individual.”

Great article that not only talks about how to be a great leader but indirectly tells you how to cultivate and instil great leadership in everyone. How? With just a few simple changes to the above quote.

”To effectively lead the life you want, you must first take the time to truly know yourself… and then adapt how you lead your life to the interests, needs, and goals of yourself.”

Note how this simple sentence accomplishes so much. Not only are you leading by example, showing the way by living the way (thus helping others to learn tacitly by immersion next to you), but you're helping others to discover their own passion and purpose in life (thus helping them to become intrinsically motivated).

Finally note how this approach is less controlling and masculine in nature. Just as a mother nurtures a child and learns to let go of them, so too do great leaders learn to nurture and let go of trying to control others, thus naturally allowing the individual and organization to fully mature as a whole.

In effect, in letting people lead themselves, that's when empowerment truly occurs because it can only be achieved by the individual themselves (i.e. figuring out their own unique path). This mirrors what Chris Argyris was trying to say in his article Empowerment: The Emperor's New Clothes.

ht +Walter H Groth
Jeff Haden outlines the only way to lead female employees that works.
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Thanks +Walter H Groth! Awesome find!
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“The real driver of creativity is an appetite for discovery and a passion for the work itself.”

Great article that's an excerpt from Sir Ken Robinson's book Creative Schools. Interestingly enough, some of the things mentioned within it mirror a conversation I had the other day about creativity with +Grizwald Grim.

“Creativity is putting your imagination to work. It is applied imagination. Innovation is putting new ideas into practice.”

“It’s a dynamic process that often involves making new connections, crossing disciplines, and using metaphors and analogies.”

“Being creative is not just about having off-the-wall ideas and letting your imagination run free. It may involve all of that, but it also involves refining, testing, and focusing what you’re doing.”
Creativity can seem like an abstract concept, but having a definition can give a learner the power to practice it on a regular basis.
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Game Design (aka How to Design a New Worldview)
“The world isn’t only about stuff after all.”

Simply phenomenal article! I've said before that my experiences in building communities online around videos games was one of the most fundamental cores experiences in my life, as it allowed me to see things in a much broader perspective. And I often feel sorry for people who haven't been able to partake of such great online gaming community experiences because it would give them the opportunity to see how working in the future really works.

With that in mind, for many people this might seem like a drab article on game design. If you read between the lines though and see the patterns emerging, you'll find yourself reading statements that mirror the same struggle we're having as a society right now in leaving our old worldview behind and designing a new one. Below are some quotes that highlight this.

On creating interdependence and community...

“...the entire game was built around the idea of weak-tie interdependence: the idea that people you don’t know well at all are in fact crucial to your survival, and important, and matter.”

“...because that sense of ‘I might bump into, or need this person again someday’ actually drives better behavior in general, less griefing, more sense of community. Which should equal greater retention and more money made.”

On valuing and rewarding creatives rather than just business executives... (with their military “combat” mindset, conquering clients and killing their competitors)

“And in order to accomplish that, I knew we needed the game to care about what they did: to recognize their actions and achievements and give credit for them, or they would always be second-class citizens, mere “support classes.”

“A sad fact about you players, as a whole: you only do what you are rewarded for. You will do something less fun if you see a carrot at the end of the stick, and you will ignore something more fun if it doesn’t give you a ‘ding’ or an XP reward or a title.”

On changing the concept of advancement... (shifting from climbing a specialist ladder to become more flexible and adaptable as a generalist)

“The first thing that had to happen to enable this was to get rid of the classic advancement paradigm.”

“More successful was the idea that your feeling of becoming more powerful should arise from the addition of capabilities to your character, not from incrementing the maximum value of some bars. It was the notion of horizontal progression, whereby you became more capable because you simply had a broader palette of ‘moves’ available to you.”

“Players rightfully said that they enjoyed variety, and wanted to try lots of things. So we let them very easily change their character. You could simply surrender any skill, and go learn another one, when at the cap. We also very much encouraged players not to think solely in terms of specialization. Doing hybrid characters was actually the ideal, not specializing solely down one tree.”
Once upon a time you could drop things on the ground. It's one of the first things a baby does, one of the most human things to do. You pick something up, drop it somewhere else. You build piles. P...
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Really nicely encapsulated, +Nollind Whachell .
 
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Scatter. Adapt. Remember.
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“Instead of meeting a problem head on, it is better to take an indirect approach if possible.”

Water can help us understand the divergence, emergence, and convergence of creativity, the flow of it.

Visualize water trying to move around a roughly spherical boulder on uneven ground. It hits one side of the boulder and diverges, beginning to creep around it from both sides. It is stopped though by depressions in the ground and thus has to slowly build up in spots before it can flow over the ground and continue on circumventing the rock. Eventually one side of the water makes it around, followed by the other side, and the two converge again to carry on as one.

What I just described is what happens in your mind when you're trying to solve a highly complex problem. In effect, you have to circumvent the problem fully, seeing it from multiple angles, before you fully understand it as a whole system. And note how some steps may require more patience as you build up further awareness and reflect upon it before getting to a point of vantage that allows you to see the next step.

BTW also note how this perspective is more feminine in nature versus the traditional masculine approach which is to break through problems with brute force (using a war mindset and only analysis to smash them to pieces). While we could do that previously in more stabler times, today we face complex problems of a more systemic nature because everything is changing as a whole. Thus we need to use systems thinking creatively, using analysis and synthesis in harmony, to understand and relate to these complex problems as a whole—from all sides at once—before we can learn to circumvent them.

And realize that we are circumventing them, these old systems, and leaving them behind because we are creating entirely new systems in their place. Thus rather than trying to change the past, we are learning to build a better world in the present reality today.

“Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, let it grow, be like water.”
— Bruce Lee

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The Paradoxical Step

Today we live in a world where our one step forward often causes us to take two steps back. To paradoxically get to tomorrow, it seemingly taking one step back that allows us to go two steps forward.

ht +Gregory Esau

#mindset #paradigm #worldview
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“The common denominator of those who ‘do something’ is conviction borne of a higher purpose that fuels the courage necessary to act.”

“When I ask clients about their values, legacy, motivators, and talents, many lack Pollaro’s level of self-awareness.”

Mirrors what I've said about the Connect, Empower, and Inspire stages of creativity. By playfully connecting with yourself and learning to understand and empower yourself, you're working towards inspiring yourself.

Eventually it's no longer a question of “Should I act?” but instead you feel intrinsically impelled to act because you understand and trust yourself, your capabilities, on a whole other level. In effect, you've become an amplified individual as Marina Gorbis calls them in her book The Nature of the Future.

ht +Gregory Esau
As we get older, deciding to pursue our dreams becomes more difficult — but it’s never too late to do something that’s important to the world.
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12. They battle Resistance every day.

Probably one of the most insightful posts I've seen on creativity. With that in mind though, I'd like to help clarify a few of these points.

Not staying on task relates to curiosity and learning to tackle problems from multiple perspectives. If they see the current approach as ineffective and another better approach, they'll dump the current approach to experiment with the other one. Think of a company that pivots as an example of this. They aren't giving up but instead shifting their focus.

Living with joy and depression is about embracing all of your emotions to embrace your whole self. Thus they learn to accept and understand their emotions and use them constructively as creative energy.

Speaking in stories relates to speaking in metaphors and with emotion which is how they bridge and connect seemingly diverse ideas that logically do not seem related on the surface.

Procrastination is basically understanding the incubation stage of creativity. You need time to let your thoughts stew or as John Cleese says to “massage them in the back of your mind”. This gives time and space for things to connect and spark.

Incomplete projects relates to learning by doing. Thus if during the project, the person learns something, they've achieved success and may leave it. Or they may feel it's not going in the direction to reveal learning and may start over from scratch. Both Leonardo Da Vinci and Picasso were famous for this. Picasso might still finish the project but he would often start over from scratch repeatedly, wiping away his previous work without a second thought like Tibetan Monks blowing away a sand mandala. 

PS. Finally remember that anyone can become highly creative. It's just a process of breaking down traditional mindsets (aka societal programming) and reframing life in a new way. 
Do you love a highly creative person? Check out these 20 things to help you better connect with them.
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It's the paradoxes that throw people off, I believe. Really, really insightful work here, +Nollind Whachell .
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“We are all entrepreneurs now.”

Great article that talks about the changing times and how their is no security in even getting a job, let alone holding one. Therefore, there's nothing wrong with obtaining a formal degree today if you're truly passionate about the work it entails but just realize that you will, more than likely, have to be your own leader and manager in creating and finding untraditional work that puts your skills and knowledge to work.

“It is a broken system. We send our kids to college at great expense to prove to employers that our kids are worthy. Kids go off to college without having a clue what they want to do when they finish, and who can blame them? I’m 55, and I only found my path in the past five years. I had inklings, of course. I tried to follow the nudges and whispers I got while supporting myself and my family. We lock kids into career paths early — the worst thing we could possibly do!”

“Entrepreneurs solve problems for their clients and customers, and many of them solve big, intractable problems that other people don’t notice or don’t care about. When you work for yourself, there is no employer hovering over you fussing about academic credentials. You don’t need a degree to start your own business.”

ht +Gregory Esau
When I was a little kid, my mom used to tell us stories about growing up on the south side of Chicago in the 1930s and 40s. I used to think
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