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Wafuku.co.uk - Vintage Japanese Kimonos
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A lover and seller of Japanese Vintage Kimonos & Collectables
A lover and seller of Japanese Vintage Kimonos & Collectables

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+gogie bee posted a link to an interesting trio of videos about Itchiku Kubota, about the man, his life and his process.
This video here is another that shows many of his kimonos even more clearly. They are magnificent.

https://youtu.be/WrpPWNVTfBw

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Elegant beauty. A geisha and a maiko.

Easy way to tell which is which... the geisha wears a wig with a widow's peak and her white make up goes beneath her hairline, whereas the maiko's white make up does not go all the way to the hairline because it is her real hair.
The maiko also wears very fancy hair decorations (kanzashi) whereas the geisha's hair decorations are more discreet and grown up.
The geisha's obi is short, the maiko wears a special one that only maiko wear, called a darari obi, which hangs all the way down to her hem.
Maiko are supposed to look like childlike, porcelain dolls.

There are lots of other clues but those are the most obvious in that photo.

Geisha have the advantage of being able to remove their wig at bedtime and sleep comfortably with head on a pillow, maiko must preserve their hairstyle, so sleep on a special neck block, resting only the neck on it and keeping the head raised so the hair touches nothing.
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How perfect and charming is this photo?

Found on 'Japanese Weapons' on Facebook.
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Japanese obis as displays.
Here you can see a maru obi on the left and a Nagoya obi on the right. Use a maru obi, fukuro obi or Nagoya obi.
A hand braided, silk obijime makes a lovely and very appropriate binding.
These two are on an obi hanger but they can be hung from a short length of bamboo or wooden pole, with a string or cord hanging loop tied on at each end.
It is a great way to enjoy the beauty of an obi and admire the design and craftsmanship, even if you never wear obis. These two obis have not been cut or damaged to make the displays, they are just folded and tied, at most they would have a couple of loose stitches holding them in shape, so these obis can easily be opened up and still worn.
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Check out this floaty, modern take on the kimono in Japan.
This is designed by Hayami Mariya.
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Without checking, at just a quick guess, which of these 4 is Scotland's National Animal?
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