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Moss rarely grows in a healthy lawn. There are many conditions that may make your lawn more susceptible to moss. Simple moss control applications can vary in their effectiveness when trying to killing moss or controlling moss. You must remember that no lawn is the same, every yard will vary in its sun exposure and soil health. A healthy lawn will usually be able to fend off moss if there is good soil for the grass to feed off of, good sun exposure, or the use of proper shade/sun tolerant grass seed. Moss is attracted to highly acidic soil that typically is less fertile and lacks nutrients. Lawns are always in need of maintenance and usually don’t get the proper maintenance needed each year to encourage lush healthy growth. There are some keys to lawn maintenance that are easy and will save you thousands. lawn image

Lawns need to breathe and absorb water efficiently, which means that they should be aerified at least once a year in the spring or fall (twice if you have bad soil conditions). This is a great time to top dress and over seed, which can be done every couple of years.

Watering can be tricky, because not everyone has an irrigation system that they can rely on to put the right amount of water down during drought season. So, paying attention to the signs of drought in your lawn and getting water to it when it needs it and not when it is too late. Home owners should be prepared to start watering in April. Days are longer and the sun is usually showing its face for more than just 1 or 2 days in a row. Once your area has its first stretch of 4 or 5 dry days with average temps of 60 degrees or more, you should be starting your watering routine. Now remember all lawns are different, but they all need at least 1 inch of water a week to growing.

Applying demossing treatments to your lawn will help to control moss and keep it from spreading. Moss treatment can be applied with fertilizer in the Early Spring and Later Fall. The addition of lime to most lawns in winter will help neutralize the ph in the lawn making it less favorable for moss to grow. Again all lawns are different so PH testing can be done to see if your lawn needs the help of lime.

Keeping up on simple lawn maintenance will help you lawn look green and lush all year long. Call Washington Tree & Lawn Care for more helpful ideas and services to assist you.   #lawncare , #mosskiller  
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CHERRY BARK TORTRIX

CBT has become quite the nuisance in the North West. It made its appearance in tortix mothRichmond BC in 1989 and was seen in Washington as early as 1991. A 1996 survey of randomly selected cherry trees in Bellingham, showed 75-80% of the trees were found to be infested with CBT. Currently, the Seattle area is experiencing these same infestation rates. tortix mothThe most damaging stage for these moths is the 2nd through the 5th Instars. These boring Lepidoptera will tunnel between the bark and cambium, but do not penetrate the hard wood. Infestations usually occur upward from the base of the tree. Infestations are easily recognized by reddish-orange colored frass accumulations or frass tubes near gallery entrances. Larvae damage trees by direct feeding which reduces or excludes transportation of nutrients to the roots. The feeding causesexudation of gum and deformation of bark growth on the main branches and trunk. Along infested sides of the tree, die back of new and old growth can occur from the portion girdles. Indirect damage occurs through the formation of habitats for secondary pests such as bark beetles, fungi, and increasing susceptibility of infested trees to successive years of freezing damage, which can result in the death of the tree.

tortrix frass
Tortrix Frass
Treatment for these pests has proven to be difficult. The only opportunity for control is to spray when the egg sacks hatch between mid-September to October. Once they are in the tree there is no control for them, so timing is imperative. If you have any questions about this pest or think you might have damage. Contact Washington Tree & Lawn Care for a free estimate.

Refferenced: http://puyallup.wsu.edu/plantclinic/resources/pdf/pls67cherrybarktortrix.pdf

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         Washington Tree & Lawn Care Newsletter | October 2014

In the Pacific Northwest, the month of October is the big transition month for trees, shrubs, lawn, and weather. Don’t be alarmed if your Evergreen trees begin dropping older inside needles. Every Fall older needles turn yellow or brown and drop off leaving the newer green growth on the ends of the branches. Cooler wet weather is not far away and coupled with the shorter days, Fall color will soon be upon us. Wet and cool means the slugs will appear in abundance. Slug control in the Fall will pay big dividends in the Spring with reduced slug populations. We now offer slug control programs consisting of 5 treatments per year.
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FALL WEED PREVENTION
AUGUST 21, 2014 MIKE WALTEREDIT

If you love weeds then this is not the article for you!

For those who want to save there back and knees then listen up!

Fall is approaching and we are preparing for our fall weed control applications for shrub beds and planting areas. flower bed Some may think that they don’t need to worry about there weeds in the fall because the dormant season is approaching and weeds will not be growing. When in fact it is not the growing weeds you need to worry about. Protecting your topsoil and beauty bark form the seeds falling from those pesky weeds will greatly diminish the weeds you will have come spring. The use of pre emergents are crucial to a weed free yard.

Ask any one of our customer service representatives about a Free Estimate for your yard.

You can follow us on twitter @watreelawnsvc
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Washington Tree & Lawn Care Newsletter - August 2014

August is a month for vacations, barbeques, and trips to the beach. But, for your lawn, August is no picnic. With temperatures hanging in the 80’s, severe drought stress can take out your lawn in as little as 4 weeks. When soil moisture is depleted, turfgrass will begin to wilt. This condition is realized as the grass goes from green to a bluish or gray smokey green. Another clue of this situation is how footprints grass (1)remain in the affected area. The turf no longer has the resilience to spring back up. In an effort to stay alive, the grass blade will turn brown, all growth will stop and the plant will go into dormancy. This will allow the turfgrass to survive for an extended period. The length of time the grass can survive in this dormant condition depends on several factors: mainly temperature, soil moisture and the overall condition of turfgrass before the onset of dormancy. In general terms, grass can withstand 3-5 weeks of being “brown” depending upon the temperature. One inch of water per week is required to keep grass green. One inch of water per month will keep grass alive as to minimize damage. Washington Tree & Lawn Care can apply wetting agents to aid in recovery or longevity.
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SUMMER HAS ARRIVED!
July is the month when summer usually shows up in the Pacific Northwest. Warm days and nights refresh the body and soul. How quickly we forget the gray when it finally is replaced by blue. Hot dry weather can burn up your landscape in just a few days. Water neglect has become the biggest problem in our area. People who think they are saving the earth by holding back water need to remember carbon dioxide is taken in by green growing plants and oxygen is released. Most sick or dead shrubs and lawns are the result of lack of water in the summer. Maintained grass needs 1 inch of water per week to stay green and 1 inch per month to survive. One should try to achieve this amount in no more than 3 waterings per week. Careful observation of the obvious will guide you. Most plants will let you know.
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WEEVILS AND LACE BUGS ARE ACTIVE!

  The season is upon us were some of your plantings may look a little chewed up or discolored.  There are two major pests that are out and about reeking havoc on your rhododendrons, azaleas, salal, Davideye, and other viburnum species.  Root Weevils and Lace Bugs like the warm days and warm nights of the spring and summer.  Each pest has there own distinct markings that they leave.
  Weevils like to leave bite marks on the outsides of the leaves,  making them look jagged chewed up.
  Lace Bugs will just suck fluid from plants’ photosynthetic tissues. This causes pale stippling and bleaching that can become very obvious on the upper leaf surface by mid to late summer .
  What makes both these guys a huge pest is the damage will stay for years after. The types of shrubs they attack do not drop there leaves every year.  They hold there leaves for many years and will flag some of the older leaves each fall, leaving those unsightly leaves for many generations.  There is some control for these pests, using the right products and the right timing can keep them at bay.
www.washingtontreeservic.com
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APPLE MAGGOT AND CODLING MOTH
Posted on June 11, 2014
Apple and Pear growers beware!  Its is time to begin treatment for your Fruit trees.  These 2 can be a real menace to your crop.  Codling moth is usually present first they will lay eggs on the fruit or on a leaf, and the larva will burrow in to the core of the fruit to feed.  They will stay for three weeks or so before the exit the fruit and overwinter in their pupa state.  The Apple maggot will lay there eggs under the skin of the fruit.  When the eggs hatch the larva will wind its way through the fruit and will typically stay there until the fruit drops.  That’s when the larva will exit the fruit and overwinter in pupa state in the soil.

The biggest issue with these pest is that the treatment options have a small window of effectiveness.  Apple maggot can only be pre-treated before the eggs are laid in the fruit, there is no treatment if the egg is already penetrated the fruit.  Codling moth is the same in the sense that once in the fruit there is not treatment.  However, because the egg is laid on top of the fruit or a leaf, then they can technically be treated after the eggs are laid and before migration to the fruit.

There can be up to 3 generations of fly or moth so continued sprays throughout the fruit growing season apple-maggot-damage-big will be necessary.  Washington Tree and Lawn Care has Fruit worm prevention programs.  Please contact them for further information or to schedule a free estimate.

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Watering? How much?

One of the big questions that pops up this time of year is, “How much should i be watering”.  We are getting to the point where mother nature will not provide enough rain to keep your trees, shrubs and lawn healthy.  Watering can be tricky, because not everyone has an irrigation system that they can rely on to put the right amount of water down during drought season.  So, paying attention to the signs of drought in your lawn and getting water to it when it needs it, not when it is too late.  Home owners should be prepared to start watering in April.  Days are longer and the sun is usually showing its face for more than just 1 or 2 days in a row.  Once your area has its first stretch of 4 or 5 dry days with average temps of 60 degrees or more, you should be starting your watering routine.  Most yard will stay healthy with 2 or 3 watering’s a week for 30 – 40 minutes at each time.  Now remember all lawns are different, but they all need at least 1 inch of water a week to grow and 1 inch of water a month to live.

Lots of people try to save money by not watering in the summer.  Yes watering can be expensive but so is re-landscaping your yard.  Conserving water is understandable but make sure you give your plants and lawn enough for them to make it through the drought season otherwise you will be spending all that money replacing your plants every spring.

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Washington Tree & Lawn Care Newsletter | June 2014

June brings back memories of long warm days and bright starry nights. The coupled reaction of a barefoot stroll and the smell of fresh cut grass bundles the thoughts of past summer fun. Rich color and intense growth signal these truly are the longest days of the year. A lawn’s requirement for food and water will peak this month. Happy plants ward off many problems and the sprays we offer fill the ticket. Natural fish fertilizer and liquid kelp are the backbone of our tree and shrub programs. Ants are on the prowl now along with the slugs. Weevils are getting their act together chomping on your rhodies, and aphids are everywhere
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