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Bethany Harvey
594 followers -
I write stories, take pictures, and make maps. Sometimes I set forest fires for science.
I write stories, take pictures, and make maps. Sometimes I set forest fires for science.

594 followers
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This cheeky macaque flashed his middle finger at a passing photographer after he was snapped taking his morning bath.

Photo credit: Jari Peltomaki

Article:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3527999/A-bit-privacy-Angry-monkey-gives-middle-finger-photographed-morning-bath.html

#biodiversity   #coolcritters   #macaque  
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I'm interviewed on LGBT STEM!

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Not what you want to see next to your foot, but s/he kindly refrained from biting me.
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For #FrogFriday, have a Barking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa). They're native to the southeast USA and particularly seem to like sandhill ponds. They're large and heavy for a treefrog, with a round body and thick legs. They can climb trees, but they can also burrow like a toad. As their name suggests, they have a loud, barking call. To me, they sound like Canada geese.
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Florida does have fall colors. They're just subtler than those up north.
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Met this little guy while fixing the fence he's on. He kept attacking the camera lens, which was awesome as it put him right where I could take a whole bunch of photos!
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For #FrogFriday, here's an Ornate Chorus Frog (Pseudacris ornata). These little guys are native to the Southeast US. They come in three colors: gray, reddish-brown, and bright green. They breed in late winter, mostly in ephemeral ponds, which is about the only place and time you're likely to see them as they are very secretive outside their breeding season. Their call sounds quite a bit like their better-known cousin the Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer).

Their population status is debated. They are not listed as threatened by any government entity, but they do seem to be declining over most of their range.
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