Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Strongblade
64 followers -
Quality Collectibles and Replicas at a Great Price
Quality Collectibles and Replicas at a Great Price

64 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
The newest Strongblade Edge post on the history of Sheilds!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The Zombie Survival Manual part 3 has arrived! This chard shows the effectiveness of axes against zombies. #zombies   #axes   #strongblade  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Here's the lowdown on best bludgeoning weapons to ward off zombie hordes. 
To read more: http://www.strongblade.com/blog/?p=170
#zombies   #zombieapocalypse   #medieval  
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
What is the best sword for fighting off a zombie horde you ask? This chart says it all. For the full article check out   http://www.strongblade.com/blog/?p=149
Photo

Post has attachment
It's hard to say when pirating first started. There are reports of pirates as far back as ancient Greece, and possibly even before, but the pirates that most people think of are the ones from the 17th through the 19th centuries. This was a time when governments actually sanctioned piracy against their enemies (apparently, it was okay to steal from and murder people as long as they were considered enemies of your country). Under these government laws, anyone could attack ships belonging to an enemy country and keep anything that they could recover from the ships. Crews that took advantage of these laws were called "Privateers," which was French for "mean guys with parrots," or "men who drink rum." Well, okay. Privateer isn't really French at all. But "soufflé" is, and it means a "light fluffy dish of egg yolks and stiffly beaten egg whites mixed with cheese or fish or fruit."

To read more go to http://www.strongblade.com/history/Pirates.html
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
When you battle on stage, you are trying to accomplish three things:

1. To present a skillful display of martial prowess that will impress and entertain the audience.
2. To move the story forward in an energetic fashion
3. To not die.

The skillful display of martial prowess requires training, practice and choreography. Moving the story forward requires a good script and a director that understands the need for good pacing and realizes that a fight scene must not just introduce action, but also says something about the characters. And to not die requires good stage combat sword. And actors who like each other.

Continue Reading at http://www.strongblade.com/blog/?p=130

Post has attachment
If your a medieval history buff you need to follow us!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Greek warriors fought in a phalanx; a unit of heavily armored men that fought in rows, with large shields (hoplons), long spears and short swords. The wealthy made up the majority of the infantry. Those with money were the only ones who could afford the horrendously expensive armor and weapons that made a Hoplite warrior. The poorer troops were thrown into skirmishing units that were armed with slings, bows and spears and wore light armor. These skirmishers were generally only on the outskirts of the battle. This strikes me as particularly ironic because in modern day warfare it seems like the poor are the ones on the front lines while the wealthy are ... well ... on their yachts, laughing and chugging boat-drinks thousands of miles away. My how Democracy has changed over the years.

The Greek Hoplites fought primarily with spears. A typical Hoplite battle consisted of opposing units charging each other with their shields up. The two units would crash together and start shoving. If you've ever seen a rugby scrum, then you get the general idea of phalanx warfare. Only, these rugby players are extremely well armored, and are jabbing long, lethal spears over the top of their shields trying to kill as many of the opposing players as possible. 
#shield   #spartan   #phalanx  
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
There really is no industry-standard definition of “battle-ready.” It’s one of those terms that people throw around, like, “special forces,” or “best-seller,” or “licensed practitioner of medicine.” What a joke. I mean, I perform surgeries all the time and I have no medical degree whatsoever. You see what I mean? The terms sort of mean something, but there is no exact specifications for it. There are some pretty solidly established minimums for battle-ready swords, and that’s probably the best place to start.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The greatest threat to a soldier wearing chain mail wasn’t a huge, beefy warrior holding a mace with a head larger than your horse’s. No, the greatest threat to a coat of mail was rain.

That’s right. Rain. Steel rings can stop the tempered blade of a longsword, but they are powerless against the faint patter of a mid-day drizzle. Good armorsmiths quenched the rings they made for armor in oil, to help protect them from the elements, but the oil was simply a deterrent. Men-at-arms usually spent the evenings after a battle oiling and cleaning their mail, but this wasn’t always effective either. In the end, rust would set in, and the armor had to be rolled in barrels of sand, or scraped by squires.

To read more check out The Strongblade Edge at http://www.strongblade.com/blog/
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded