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Bryan Krusniak (Home Profile)
Works at AT Still University
Attended University of Michigan
Lives in Missouri
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Bryan Krusniak

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Yep..... it pretty much goes by that quickly.
 
Pretty amazing
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Bryan Krusniak

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Don't invest in electronic textbook companies. Here is why.
 
No bubbles!
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WANT - When can we get this on Google Glass?
 
All Access subscribers will get the best experience, but this is a neat trick just for your own collection Google is constantly working on the back-end service side of Google Now, as evidenced by the new key phrases you can say to the app to do things, even without an app update. We saw "take a...
All Access subscribers will get the best experience, but this is a neat trick just for your own collection Google is constantly working on the back-end service side of Google Now, as evidenced by the new key phrases you can say to the app to do things, even without an app update. We saw "take a picture" and "take a video" earlier this week, and now you can simply say "play some music"...
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Bryan Krusniak

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Sad but true.  Purposeful deception exists... and is sometimes practiced by entire industries.
 
Ignorance: It's a product

Robert Proctor doesn't think ignorance is bliss. He thinks that what you don't know can hurt you. And that there's more ignorance around than there used to be, and that its purveyors have gotten much better at filling our heads with nonsense.

Proctor, a professor of the history of science at Stanford, is one of the world's leading experts in agnotology, a neologism signifying the study of the cultural production of ignorance.

The tobacco industry was a pioneer at this. Its goal was to erode public acceptance of the scientifically proven links between smoking and disease: In the words of an internal 1969 memo legal opponents extracted from Brown & Williamson's files, "Doubt is our product." Big Tobacco's method should not be to debunk the evidence, the memo's author wrote, but to establish a "controversy."

When this sort of manipulation of information is done for profit, or to confound the development of beneficial public policy, it becomes a threat to health and to democratic society. Big Tobacco's program has been carefully studied by the sugar industry, which has become a major target of public health advocates.

It's also echoed by vaccination opponents, who continue to use a single dishonest and thoroughly discredited British paper to sow doubts about the safety of childhood immunizations, and by climate change deniers.

Proctor came to the study of agnotology through his study of the Nazi scientific establishment and subsequently of the tobacco industry's defensive campaign.
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LEGO may allow customers to 3D print their own bricks.

LEGO told The Financial Times that it is considering “what potential opportunities there are for consumers” to print bricks using home 3D printers.

http://gigaom.com/2014/03/03/lego-mulls-letting-customers-3d-print-their-own-bricks/
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Bryan Krusniak

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Yep... I agree that questions about why and how we should work are going to be  increasingly important for society. 
 
+Charlie Stross has a challenging and very interesting essay asking the question: Why should we work?

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2014/04/a-nation-of-slaves.html

We tend to talk around this issue a lot, but a key issue is this: as productivity (the amount of stuff of value we can create per hour of work) goes up, how much of that increase do we put in to increasing the amount of stuff of value we create, and how much do we put into decreasing the amount of work we do -- or put another way, what's the value of leisure?

Another way to look at this is to consider an extreme limit. Say that tomorrow, someone invented a couple of Magic Boxes. One of them lets you pour cheap raw materials (dirt, rocks) in one end, push a button, and anything you request, from a hamburger to a car, comes out the other end. Another one will answer any question you ask, organize anything you need organized, do research for you, synthesize the data, explain things to you, and so on. A third one will pick up any physical item and take it anywhere in the world you need to be. If it's not obvious, these magic boxes are just the limits of technology we already have.

Now in this post-Magic Box world, a lot of good things happen. For one thing, magic boxes themselves are cheap, because they can be made by magic boxes. (Someone will try to ban that, of course, and this will work about as well as banning people from humming songs) It's hard to go hungry when you can just dump dirt into your magic box and get a meal. Likewise, any clothing, shelter, and medicine you might need is just there, and another magic box can help you figure out which things will help you satisfy your needs. If you can afford the cheapest magic box, you can have the riches of Croesos.

On the other hand, you might notice that a huge fraction of all jobs in the world would cease to exist as well. Almost the entire manufacturing, service, logistics, or information sectors would cease to exist. Pretty much the only jobs remaining would be to come up with new designs to fit in to the magic boxes -- and it's not hard to imagine that magic boxes could do a lot of that, too. 

If we kept running the world the way we do now -- the way it would happen if someone literally invented these boxes tomorrow -- then we would find ourselves in a very strange state. Having successfully pushed productivity to infinity, and eliminated all possible cause for want in the world, almost everyone in the world would be suddenly unemployed, unable to access a magic box, and would starve to death.

This is obviously stupid.

The flaw in this, of course, is that our tendency to tie work to access to resources makes no sense in a world where the total amount of actual work to be done is much less than the total number of people around to do it. In this post-Box world, there simply aren't enough jobs for everyone.

That's not a bad thing for the basic reason that Stross explains. Most jobs aren't things you would want for their own sakes. Consider: If you suddenly inherited £100M, would you stay in your job? If you would -- if you would do this job even if it had nothing to do with earning money -- then your job is actually worth something to you in its own right, and you would probably keep doing it in a post-Box world. If, on the other hand, you would leave your job immediately, then your job has no value of its own to you: it exists only as a means to an end, and as soon as you have a better means, you're out of there.

The reason this is important is that we're already in the early days of the Magic Box Economy. When we see jobs disappearing around the world and not being replaced by new jobs -- entire trade sectors vanishing -- and the overall actual unemployment rate (not the rate of people looking for work, but the rate of people who aren't working for pay at all) rising, but at the same time overall global productivity is increasing, what we're seeing is that many of the jobs which used to be necessary for us as a species to survive are simply no longer needed. 

However, our economy, and our thinking about the economy, continues to be based on the idea that jobs are good, and working is good, and if you aren't trying to work harder, something must be wrong with you. Which means that, as people's jobs become completely obsoleted, with no useful "retraining" available since the total number of jobs has permanently gone down, we conclude that these people must therefore be drains on our society, and cut them off from the magic box, even though a surprisingly small amount of money is (in our semi-Box economy) already enough to survive.

What I've talked about above is the problem -- namely, how to manage the transition between a work-based economy and a magic box economy. There have been many solutions proposed to this, and I'm not going to go into all of them now. (For the record, I suspect that the "universal basic income" approach is probably the simplest and best solution, although my mind is by no means made up)

But it's come time to start thinking about this: As our wealth goes to infinity, how do we avoid starving to death?

(Image by ILO/Aaron Santos: https://flic.kr/p/hJVSyL)
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This is what April Fools Day should be like.
 
This is such a great idea. After you wipe the tears of joy from your eyes, please press SHARE and get this project some attention and love, okay? 
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Bryan Krusniak

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This story only starts to highlight a variety of issues that higher education is going to have to address.
  
1) Quality (or at least the perception of quality) of Online education vs. traditional residential education
2) Balancing Tax subsidies between those seeking and those providing education
3) Cost differences between models (or providers) of education
4) Fairness of providing education support to younger people (with relatively little work experience) vs. older people (with presumably more work experience) 
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Bryan Krusniak

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Support STEAM education in Kirksville

Enjoyed the STEM Summit this past week sponsored by the Kirksville Chamber of Commerce.  Lots of representation from the +Kirksville Schools and +Truman State University.  I'm hoping that we can come together as a community and creatively support and nurture STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) or better yet as +Betsy A. Tornatore pointed out STEAM -> to throw in the arts to the mix.  Our local Robotics group +The Clockworks - FLL Team is ready to help.
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Bryan Krusniak

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People
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706 people
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Work
Occupation
Assistant VP for ITS
Employment
  • AT Still University
    Information Technology, 1998 - present
  • Cooper Industries
  • Andersen Consulting
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Missouri
Previously
Michigan - Chicago - Luxembourg - St. Louis
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Some guy who is just trying to make the world a little better place to spend time
Introduction
True Believer.  Good use of technology improves education, healthcare, relationships.... and lives.

Put me in your circles related to:
  • Education and Learning
  • Technology
  • Bicycling
  • Fatherhood
  • Rural Living
  • Maker Spaces
  • FLL - First Lego League
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Can ride a Unicycle
Education
  • University of Michigan
  • Washington University in St. Louis
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Iwanyoro Pinion (Second Life)
This was my first try at Poutine, so I'm not sure I'm an appropriate judge, but I had a Poutinie Weanie and enjoyed it. Moreover it was a fun place to eat in the heart of Stratford.
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Very good
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
We stayed here during a family vacation to Toronto. The great location made it an excellent choice. Our room was on the 12th floor and was quite comfortable for our family of 5 (3 teenagers). The fridge and microwave, as well as several nearby restaurants, made up for the fact that no breakfast was included. Parking in the nearby garage was convenient. Our only complaints were that the beds were VERY firm, and the elevators quite slow.
Appeal: Very goodFacilities: GoodService: Very good
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
Stopped here on our way to Canada for some authentic polish good. I grew up in a polish household and was not disappointed by the food here. Great Buffett at a fair price. Excellent.
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very goodService: Good
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
Nice facility and little wait time make this a decent place for a cut. I am not one who cares a lot about my hair style so the low cost is also appealing.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
11 reviews
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This restaurant was a great way for us to share the "up north" experience with our kids, who had never tasted a pastie after a lengthy car ride. I had the veggie and it was quite good. The authentic use of turnips gives the pastie a memorable and enjoyable flavor.
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
College type hangout place. Food is decent and staff is friendly.
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 10 months ago
reviewed 10 months ago
These guys will get you in and out and do a good job. As of November 2012, they are adding on to their lobby a bit. Solid service.
Quality: Very goodAppeal: GoodService: Very good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago