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Mott Marvin Kornicki
Real Estate Broker ○ Florida Notary Public
Real Estate Broker ○ Florida Notary Public
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New evidence raises doubts about executives’ handling of the Equifax breach - +The Verge

New evidence calls into question Equifax’s handling of the breach reported last week, which compromised 143 million user details including Social Security numbers, birthdates, and addresses.

Equifax discovered a breach of its computer systems in March, months earlier than it previously admitted to, reports Bloomberg, citing three people with knowledge of the matter. The relationship between the two breaches is unclear, but one source B_loomberg_ spoke to said the breaches involve the same intruders. Both hacks appear to have exploited the same vulnerability in Apache software that Equifax didn’t fully patch until it was too late.

Two sources also told the newswire that Equifax had hired Mandiant — a firm that helps companies respond to security threats — after the initial breach, but brought them back on July 29th after suspicious activity was detected again.

However, an Equifax spokesperson said that hiring Mandiant the first time was unrelated to the July 29th incident.Bloomberg reports that in early March, the company began to notify some customers of a breach. Equifax hasn’t publicly disclosed the March incident.

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Evacuate or Die, Puerto Rico Officials Warn as Hurricane Maria Bears Down - +NBC News

Evacuate or Die, Puerto Rico Officials Warn as Hurricane Maria Bears Down. Authorities warned Puerto Ricans to evacuate or die on Tuesday as Hurricane Maria, the most powerful storm to threaten the region in almost 90 years, barreled toward the U.S. territory.

Maria, a Category 5 storm — the strongest there is — killed one person and injured two other people as it roared through the island of Guadeloupe on Monday night.

At 9 p.m. ET, Maria's winds had strengthened to 175 mph as it churned within 145 miles of San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was passing near the U.S. Virgin Islands on Tuesday night and was heading straight toward Puerto Rico at about 10 mph, on track for arrival Wednesday at midday.
"Locations may be uninhabitable for weeks or months," the U.S. National Hurricane Center warned Tuesday.

Maria should weaken as it crosses Puerto Rico, but it's expected to remain a Category 4 storm as late as Friday night, forecasters said. As far as destruction is concerned, the distinction is immaterial, said Orelon Sidney, a meteorologist for The Weather Channel, who said,

"Whatever a 5 can do, a 4 can do."
Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló told reporters Tuesday that Maria "promises to be much more devastating" than was Hurricane Irma, which killed at least 70 people as it plowed through the Caribbean and the Southeastern United States earlier this month.

"If you are in a flood zone, your life is in danger," Rosselló said. "If you are in a wooden house, your life is in danger."

Héctor Pesquera, Puerto Rico's commissioner of public safety, was even more blunt.

"You have to evacuate — otherwise, you are going to die," he said, according to Telemundo, NBC's Spanish-language network. "I do not know how to make this any clearer."

President Donald Trump has declared states of emergency in both territories, and the Coast Guard has moved all its ships, aircraft and personnel out of harm's way so they can quickly launch rescue missions once the storm passes, officials said.

Related: Hurricane Maria Devastates Dominica on Path to Puerto Rico
Hurricane warnings also went up in the Dominican Republic from Cabo Engano to Puerto Plata.

The last time the region was threatened by a storm this powerful was in 1928, when the Okeechobee Hurricane roared through the Virgin Islands and slammed Puerto Rico. It killed more than 300 people there and left a trail of destruction from one end of the island to the other before heading on to Florida.

In the end, it wound up being one of the deadliest hurricanes on record to hit North America, killing more than 4,000 people — most of them poor black residents who lived near Lake Okeechobee in South Florida and whose bodies were buried in mass graves.

But back then, Puerto Rico had a population of less than 1.5 million and was largely rural. Today, the population is nearly 3.5 million. And it's still feeling the effects of Irma, which at its worst point cut off power to more than 1 million people.
"I am personally without electricity since last night," San Juan resident Monica Morales told NBC News by phone. "Some people had their power out since before it passed, and they still haven't had it restored."

With several days to prepare, many Puerto Ricans stocked up on supplies, boarded up their homes and headed once again for shelters and higher ground.
Morales, 48, the mother of two children, said she would ride out the storm with her parents and brother at a home in Rio Piedras.

"Everybody's tense. The streets are a little crazy now," she said. "The streetlights aren't working. Gas stations — the ones that do have gas, the lines — are incredible. People are like a little bit crazy, panicked."

Maria roared through Dominica and Guadeloupe overnight. One person was killed by a falling tree on Guadeloupe and two other people were still missing after a boat disappeared off the coast, authorities said.

In Dominica, the 72,000 or so residents were digging out after the storm.
"Initial reports are of widespread devastation," Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit reported on his Facebook page. "So far we have lost all what money can buy and replace."

Skerrit reported Monday night that he'd had to be rescued from his own home, the roof of which was blown off.

"Dominica had very little time to prepare for this monster," said NBC News meteorologist Bill Karins, who said Maria was one of the fastest-growing hurricanes ever recorded. "I fear what we will see during the daylight hours from Dominica and Guadeloupe. They had little time to prepare for the strongest storm of their lifetimes."

The French island of Martinique, which at one point appeared poised to take a direct hit from Maria, also sustained heavy damage, authorities said.

It's only the second time in recorded history that two Category 5 hurricanes have made landfall in a hurricane season, Karins said.

The last time that happened in the Atlantic basin was in 2007, when Dean and Felix killed 174 people in Mexico and Central America. They were so destructive that both of their names were retired.

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Deadly earthquake strikes central Mexico - CBS News

MEXICO CITY -- A powerful earthquake jolted central Mexico on Tuesday, killing more than 130 people, cracking building facades and scattering rubble on streets in the capital on the anniversary of a devastating 1985 quake.

The nationwide death toll rose to 139 on Tuesday evening, according to Mexico's head of Civil Defense.
Luis Felipe Puente said 64 people had died in the state of Morelos, just south of Mexico City, though local officials reported only 54. In addition, 36 people died in Mexico City, 29 in Puebla state, nine in the State of Mexico and one in Guerrero.

The earthquake is the deadliest in Mexico since the 1985 quake that killed thousands. It came less than two weeks after another powerful quake left 90 dead in the country's south.

Scores of buildings collapsed into mounds of rubble or were severely damaged in densely populated parts of Mexico City and nearby states. Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera said buildings collapsed at 44 places in the capital alone. Between 50 and 60 people were pulled alive from the rubble by citizens and rescue workers in the city.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake had a magnitude of 7.1 and was centered near the Puebla state town of Raboso, about 76 miles southeast of Mexico City.

The federal interior minister, Miguel Angel Osorio Chong, said authorities had reports of people possibly still being trapped in collapsed buildings. He said search efforts were slow because of the fragility of rubble.
"It has to be done very carefully," he said. And "time is against us."

At one site, reporters saw onlookers cheer as a woman was pulled from the rubble. Rescuers immediately called for silence so that they could listen for others who might be trapped.

Puebla Gov. Tony Galil said there had been damaged buildings in the city of Cholula, including collapsed church steeples.

Earlier in the day, workplaces across the city held readiness drills on the anniversary of the 1985 quake, a magnitude 8.0 shake, which killed thousands of people and devastated large parts of Mexico City.

Thousands of Mexico City residents fled office buildings and hugged to calm each other along the central Reforma Avenue as alarms blared, and traffic stopped around the Angel of Independence monument.

When the quake hit, freelance reporter Manuel Rueda was walking outside a bank in the city's financial district when buildings began to shake. "People here are are used to encountering these types of situations, but this time, I definitely sensed more fear from people," he said on CBSN.

Citizens played a crucial role in rescue efforts, like 26-year-old nutritionist Mariana Morales who was one of many that did everything they could to rescue others.

Morales wore a paper face mask and her hands were still dusty from having joined a rescue brigade to clear rubble from a building that fell in a cloud of dust before her eyes, about 15 minutes after the quake.

A dust-covered Carlos Mendoza, 30, said that he and other volunteers had been able to pull two people alive from the ruins of a collapsed apartment building after three hours of effort. "We saw this and came to help," he said. "It's ugly, very ugly."

Market stall vendor Edith Lopez, 25, said she was in a taxi a few blocks away when the quake struck Tuesday. She said she saw glass bursting out of the windows of some buildings. She was anxiously trying to locate her children, whom she had left in the care of her disabled mother.

Video on social media showed debris falling from Mexico City's National Employment Service building. Residents can be heard screaming and crying as some ran away from the building.

President Trump tweeted his support for Mexico on Tuesday afternoon: "God bless the people of Mexico City. We are with you and will be there for you."

Earlier this month, dozens were killed after another earthquake struck, off Mexico's southern coast. It toppled hundreds of buildings, triggering tsunami evacuations and sending panicked people fleeing into the streets in the middle of the night.
Dr. Lucy Jones, a seismologist who spent years with the USGS, said Tuesday's earthquake is smaller than the Sept. 7 temblor, but that it struck closer to more residents.

"This earthquake is smaller but closer to many more people. So where the 8.2 was offshore -- and at a depth of 40 miles down -- this is only 80 miles from Mexico City, about 30 miles down, and with a lot of people nearby. Proximity makes a big difference," she told CBS News.

Much of Mexico City is built on former lakebed, and the soil is known to amplify the effects of earthquakes even hundreds of miles away.

"Mexico City is built on dry lake bed. So there was a lake there, it dried out, it left behind these sediments that are very very loose. And so when the seismic waves come through them, the loose soil slows them down, but they still have all that energy so they have to get bigger to carry that loose soil," Jones explained.

"Here in downtown Los Angeles, we have a factor of five amplification because of soils. In Mexico City, it's over a factor of 100."

Mexico City's international airport suspended operations and was checking facilities for any damage.
Initial calculations show that more than 30 million people would have felt moderate shaking from Tuesday's quake. The U.S. Geological Survey predicts "significant casualty and damage are likely and the disaster is potentially widespread."

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Still A Category 5, Maria Barrels Toward Puerto Rico And Virgin Islands - +HuffPost

Still A Category 5, Maria Barrels Toward Puerto Rico And Virgin Islands
Damage to Dominica on Monday night was "mind boggling," the island's prime minister said. After pummeling Dominica on Monday night, Hurricane Maria is on track toward Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands at continued Category 5 strength.

The “potentially catastrophic” storm, carrying 160 mph winds, is expected to keep moving west-northwest over the Caribbean Sea on Tuesday before passing near or over the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center said Tuesday morning.

The destruction in Dominica is “mind boggling,” the island’s Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit said in a Facebook post. He described a situation in which the storm had ripped the roofs off the homes of nearly everyone he’d spoken to.

“My roof is gone. I am at the complete mercy of the hurricane. House is flooding,” Skerrit had written some hours earlier, before he was rescued.

In Guadeloupe, a French territory north of Dominica, the storm killed at least one person, officials said Tuesday. Another two are missing.

Puerto Rico was largely spared by Hurricane Irma earlier this month but is preparing for a direct hit from Maria.

“This is an extremely dangerous hurricane andlife-threatening impacts are anticipated across [Puerto Rico] and the Virgin Islands!” the National Weather Service’s San Juan office tweeted Tuesday morning.

If the forecasts prove correct, the destruction that Maria brings to Puerto Rico could break records, Eric Blake, a National Hurricane Center scientist, tweeted.

Even as Maria approached, Irma recovery efforts were still underway on the islands in its path. On Monday, 85 percent of customers in and around San Juan, Puerto Rico’s capital, remained without electricity because of Irma. Eleven percent were still without drinking water.

Puerto Rico’s ability to bounce back from this year’s hurricanes is complicated by its ongoing economic troubles. After a year of defaulting on its loan payments, the territory declared bankruptcy in May, marking the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history.

The U.S. and British Virgin Islands are also expected to take a hit from Maria on Wednesday. Those islands received a more severe beating from Irma, driving some residents to reconsider their plans to ever rebuild as Maria neared.

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Opioid overdoses shorten US life expectancy by 2½ months - CNN

Opioid drugs — including both legally prescribed painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, as well as illegal drugs such as heroin or illicit fentanyl — are not only killing Americans, they are shortening their overall life spans. Opioids take about 2½ months off our lives, according to a new analysis published in the medical journal JAMA.

In 2015, American life expectancy dropped for the first time since 1993. Public health officials have hypothesized that opioids reduced life expectancy for non-Hispanic white people in the United States from 2000 to 2014. Researchers have now quantified how much opioids are shortening US life spans.

The researchers noted that the number of opioid overdose deaths are probably underestimated because of gaps in how death certificates are completed.

From 2000 to 2015, death rates due to heart disease, diabetes and other key causes declined, adding 2¼ years to US life expectancy. But increases in deaths from Alzheimer's disease, suicide and other causes offset some of those gains. On average, Americans can now expect to live 78.8 years, according to data from 2015, the most recent data available. That's a statistically significant drop of 0.1 year, about a month, from the previous year.

Women can still expect to live longer than men — 81.2 years vs. 76.3 years — but both of those estimates were lower in 2015 than they were in 2014.

Life expectancy at age 65 remained the same in 2015. Once you've reached that age, you can expect to live another 19.4 years. Again, women fare slightly better: 20.6 years vs. 18 years for men.

Drug overdose deaths reach new highs - Drug overdose deaths are expected to continue to reach new record highs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects drug overdose deaths to top 64,000 in 2016 when the numbers are finalized — that's more than the number of American troops lost during the Vietnam War. Most of these overdoses involved an opioid. Since 1999, the number of opioid-related drug deaths has more than quadrupled.

While prescription opioids like oxycodone or hydrocodone were considered to be driving factors in the increasing rates of overdose in the early part of the 2000s, heroin and illicit fentanyl have become the drivers for opioid overdose deaths in recent years. In fact, the number of overdose deaths related to fentanyl is expected to more than double, from an estimated 9,945 in 2016 to 20,145 in 2017, the CDC says. For the first time, fentanyl will be the leading cause of opioid overdose.

'It's a national emergency'
On the heels of the release of a draft report of the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, over the summer, President Donald Trump said "The opioid crisis is an emergency, and I am saying, officially, right now, it is an emergency. It's a national emergency.

"We're going to spend a lot of time, a lot of effort and a lot of money on the opioid crisis," he added. "It is a serious problem the likes of which we have never had."

Yet, five weeks have passed since Trump's statement, and the White House has yet to make any sort of formal announcement of a national emergency.

In addition, this week, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican who chairs the drug addiction commission, posted a letter on the White House's website requesting an additional four weeks for the commission to complete its final report. "In the interest of submitting ... sound recommendations, our research and policy development are still in progress," wrote Christie. "Accordingly, and pursuant to the Executive Order establishing the Commission, we are seeking an additional four weeks to finalize our work."

Many public health officials point to the over-prescribing of narcotic painkillers as one of the roots of the opioid overdose epidemic. Last year, the CDC issued prescribing guidelines for using opioids to treat chronic pain.

According to a recent government report, the No. 1 reason people misuse prescription drugs is to manage pain. In an attempt to help deal with the pain issue, the Trump administration is partnering with private pharmaceutical companies to help fast-track non-opioid, non-addictive pain relief alternatives.

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Opioid overdoses shorten US life expectancy by 2½ months - CNN

Opioid drugs — including both legally prescribed painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, as well as illegal drugs such as heroin or illicit fentanyl — are not only killing Americans, they are shortening their overall life spans. Opioids take about 2½ months off our lives, according to a new analysis published in the medical journal JAMA.

In 2015, American life expectancy dropped for the first time since 1993. Public health officials have hypothesized that opioids reduced life expectancy for non-Hispanic white people in the United States from 2000 to 2014. Researchers have now quantified how much opioids are shortening US life spans.

The researchers noted that the number of opioid overdose deaths are probably underestimated because of gaps in how death certificates are completed.

From 2000 to 2015, death rates due to heart disease, diabetes and other key causes declined, adding 2¼ years to US life expectancy. But increases in deaths from Alzheimer's disease, suicide and other causes offset some of those gains. On average, Americans can now expect to live 78.8 years, according to data from 2015, the most recent data available. That's a statistically significant drop of 0.1 year, about a month, from the previous year.

Women can still expect to live longer than men — 81.2 years vs. 76.3 years — but both of those estimates were lower in 2015 than they were in 2014.

Life expectancy at age 65 remained the same in 2015. Once you've reached that age, you can expect to live another 19.4 years. Again, women fare slightly better: 20.6 years vs. 18 years for men.

Drug overdose deaths reach new highs

Drug overdose deaths are expected to continue to reach new record highs.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects drug overdose deaths to top 64,000 in 2016 when the numbers are finalized — that's more than the number of American troops lost during the Vietnam War. Most of these overdoses involved an opioid. Since 1999, the number of opioid-related drug deaths has more than quadrupled.

While prescription opioids like oxycodone or hydrocodone were considered to be driving factors in the increasing rates of overdose in the early part of the 2000s, heroin and illicit fentanyl have become the drivers for opioid overdose deaths in recent years. In fact, the number of overdose deaths related to fentanyl is expected to more than double, from an estimated 9,945 in 2016 to 20,145 in 2017, the CDC says. For the first time, fentanyl will be the leading cause of opioid overdose.

'It's a national emergency'
On the heels of the release of a draft report of the President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, over the summer, President Donald Trump said "The opioid crisis is an emergency, and I am saying, officially, right now, it is an emergency. It's a national emergency.

"We're going to spend a lot of time, a lot of effort and a lot of money on the opioid crisis," he added. "It is a serious problem the likes of which we have never had."
Yet, five weeks have passed since Trump's statement, and the White House has yet to make any sort of formal announcement of a national emergency.

In addition, this week, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican who chairs the drug addiction commission, posted a letter on the White House's website requesting an additional four weeks for the commission to complete its final report. "In the interest of submitting ... sound recommendations, our research and policy development are still in progress," wrote Christie. "Accordingly, and pursuant to the Executive Order establishing the Commission, we are seeking an additional four weeks to finalize our work."

Many public health officials point to the over-prescribing of narcotic painkillers as one of the roots of the opioid overdose epidemic. Last year, the CDC issued prescribing guidelines for using opioids to treat chronic pain.

According to a recent government report, the No. 1 reason people misuse prescription drugs is to manage pain. In an attempt to help deal with the pain issue, the Trump administration is partnering with private pharmaceutical companies to help fast-track non-opioid, non-addictive pain relief alternatives

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iOS 11 review: 10 things to try - The Verge

iOS 11 review: 10 things to try
What to do after you upgrade
iOS 11 is available, officially, today. It's coming to every iPhone and iPad made in the past few years, and chances are, you're going to upgrade. When you install it on your iPhone, you'll find that some things are very different than what you're used to, but the core of how you get around and experience the OS will be the same. For example: the Control Center is wildly different and notifications have changed slightly, but you still have that comfortable (and comforting) grid of apps on the home screen. A lot is new, but not so much that you can't recognize it.
The iPad is a different story. That's where Apple has made the most radical changes to the way you open and manage your apps. Apple has introduced an app dock that's available no matter what you're doing with a quick swipe up, so you can get to your most-important apps quicker. It's also changed the way that multitasking works, giving you more flexibility with split-screen apps. And you can now drag and drop content between apps, a feature that takes some finger Jiu Jitsu, but is remarkably powerful once you get used to it.
We covered all the big features, especially on the iPad, in our iOS 11 preview last June, so I'm not going to dive too deeply into the nitty gritty of how every feature works here. Since those earlier betas, not a ton has changed — and let's face it, you're going to upgrade. Apple is the best at pushing these software updates out, and they almost always go off without a hitch. This year, more than others, you'll be getting features that will make you want to upgrade.
Here are 10 things you should definitely go play around with after you upgrade, along with some opinions about each of them.
Customize the Control Center
The first thing you're going to want to dig into on iOS 11 is the all-new Control Center. It's completely redesigned so that it sits on a single screen instead of on two or three swiping panels. It’s a little weird at first, with a wacky array of buttons and widgets. Some of them are simple button toggles, others are panels that you can force touch to expand for even more options.
Force touching the flashlight brings up a slider that lets you change its intensity. Force touching the networking panel brings up all your wireless radios and (praise be) a button to toggle your hot spot. One nice note: if you turn on airplane mode and then turn Bluetooth on again, that toggle "sticks." So the next time you turn on airplane mode, your Bluetooth headphones won't disconnect. Nice.
For the first time, Apple is providing a settings pane where you can customize which buttons do and don't appear in Control Center, and you can reorder them as well. Apple is still not letting third-party developers put anything in here, but maybe next year it will.
In the meantime, there are a few panels that I'm really impressed with. There's quick access to the Apple TV remote; if you have Control Center turned on for your lock screen, it might actually be more convenient than the real remote. I also think that the screen recording feature is super neat. It records a quick movie of whatever you're doing on-screen. It seems like a feature custom-designed for reviewers and tech support, but it actually lets you do clever things like record gameplay or quickly grab a video clip.
I'm still mystified as to why Apple doesn't put quick access to a Wi-Fi network selection screen somewhere in there, though. You still have to hunt through settings to change your Wi-Fi network or select a new one. I am glad to see that it's easier to switch Bluetooth devices directly in Control Center, but I find the location (under the music widget) a little unintuitive.
iOS on iPhone X
Apple wasn't eager to provide more details on how exactly iOS 11 changes on the iPhone X, but we do know quite a bit based on our hands-on with the device last week. There's no home button. Instead, you swipe up to go home. A half-swipe will bring up multitasking. To get to the Control Center, you swipe down from the upper right. Swiping down from anywhere else brings up notifications.
With the home button gone, you unlock the phone with your face. Double-tap the side button to activate Apple Pay, then authenticate with your face before you tap the payment reader. Long-press that same button to activate Siri.
More than anything, though, people are curious to see how the notch that cuts into the top of the screen will affect things. Many designers have expressed skepticism (to say the least) about this design decision.
I won't render judgement until things shake out, except to say this: I've been using Android phones for years with a silly array of screen sizes, aspect ratios, extra displays, and (most recently) screen cutouts. And you know what? It's fine.
I expect that once we use the iPhone X, we'll find that the notch gives us more (in terms of more screen space in portrait mode) than it takes away (in terms of weird cutouts in landscape).
Learn how notifications work
Apple and I have a very serious disagreement about notifications. I want them to be a place where I can quickly triage a ton of things. I want to get an overview of my day and take action on the stuff I care about while swiping away the stuff I don't. I like to manage my notifications, and once they're properly curated I get a ton of utility out of a notification pane. I can see what emails matter, I can respond to texts directly, I can dismiss stuff I don't care about. I basically don't even need the home screen.
Except doing all of that on iOS 11 feels like wading through chest-high mud.
Apple's philosophy is that I'm trying way too hard. Notifications are flying in so fast and at such volume that it's not worth trying to live your life in that screen. Instead, you should just let them flow by, pay attention to one or two that you care about, and ignore the rest. If you really care, you can hit a little X button to clear them all out at the end of the day.
Apple has made a few concessions to my way of thinking since the first betas of iOS 11 came out. You can swipe away notifications now, and there's also that X button at the very top that you can force press to clear all. But Apple still adamantly refuses to borrow a bunch of the notification innovations Android brought, such as grouping notifications from a single app together and putting higher-priority notifications at the top. I also find that managing notification settings requires way too much bouncing around within the Settings app.
But the most fascinating thing about notifications on iOS 11 is that the shade you pull down from the top is the same thing as your lock screen. They look and operate exactly the same: down to swipe over to your camera and to your widget screen. It's one fewer conceptual "Zone" to have to think about, and once you get used to it you'll wonder why it wasn't always that way. Especially with the iPhone X, your phone is basically always going to be unlocked when it's in your hand, so it makes sense that the "lock screen" and the "notification screen" are collapsed into one unit.
One clever thing that you won't see unless you get an iPhone X: iOS 11 can default to hiding the content of your notifications on the screen, as before. But as soon as it recognizes your face, it will show their contents on your lock screen.
Dig around the Files app
The next thing you should check out is the new Files app on iOS 11. It's great. If you're deep into the iCloud ecosystem, you'll find all the files you've got stored on your other devices here — including what's on your Mac's desktop and documents folder.
That's not that different from what was available before, but Apple is doing something new: giving top-level access to other, third-party cloud storage apps. Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, and OneDrive will all be available in the Files app. Right now, most of those just sort of link to their respective apps inside the Files app, but I hope and expect they'll become "first class" citizens over time.
Whatever cloud service you use to store files (and at this point, you really should be using something), it's worth stopping by the Files app to see if it's working there. Chances are, it will be. The other reason to stop by the Files app is that it's a good place to start playing around with another great iOS 11 feature: drag and drop.
Learn how to use drag and drop
On the iPhone, there are only two places where you can drag and drop stuff. The first is on the home screen, and it's great. When you long-press (not force touch) an icon to go into "jiggly mode" to move stuff around, you can start dragging an icon — same as before. But now, you can tap other icons to add them to the "drag group," which makes rearranging your home screen much easier.
The other place is within the Files app, where you can move multiple files between folders. Unfortunately, once you hit the home button, you're all done dragging. Things are much more powerful on the iPad, where you can drag and drop a kajillion different things a kajillion different ways. You simply start dragging a file, photo, or a snippet of text on the iPad with one hand, but then use your other hand to start navigating the table to open the app you want to drag into.
More apps will need to gain support for drag and drop to make it truly useful on the iPad, but I'm a little disappointed that it's not available on the iPhone. I get it: it already feels weird to be making these multi-app workflows happen on a big screen, so on a smaller screen it would probably feel like a mess.
Still, as I said in my preview, my favorite thing about iOS 11 is that it recognizes that its users are not so easily befuddled by complex user interfaces — and even if they are, the good ol' way of doing things is still available.
Play with multitasking on the iPad
Multitasking on the iPhone is basically unchanged. Multitasking on the iPad is a near-revelatory experience — at least for people who have been trying to do Real Work on the tablet for years now.
You can do split screen as before, but there's more freedom to set your "skinny" app on either side. When you do split screen, those two apps get "paired" so they appear together in the multitasking view.
It goes way deeper than that, though. You can drag apps up from the dock into either side of a split screen. You can open a third app up in a "slide over" view that just sort of hangs out over your other apps, but can can dismissed and called back with a swipe over from the side of the screen. You can convert those slide-over apps into properly split-screen apps by carefully dragging a handle at the top of the window.
It's not as intuitive nor as simple nor as easy to manipulate as a traditional windowing system like you'll get on a Mac, PC, or Chromebook. But it's radically more powerful than what has ever been available on an iPad before. If it all feels too complex to you, you can mostly ignore it and just run one app at a time. But once you get a feel for it, you'll find you can get much more done on an iPad than you could before.
Give Siri another try
The common knock on Siri is that people try it, it fails, and people stop trying it. Siri isn't perfect, but it is much more capable than many give it credit for. Which is another way of saying: give it another shot, you might be surprised.
The big update you'll notice right away is that Apple has tuned Siri so that its voice sounds much more natural and less computer-like. It's just a little less grating to speak to your phone and have your phone speak back.
In terms of raw functionality, it's hard to really pin specific features to iOS 11, since Apple updates Siri all the time on the server side. But two new things are worth trying. First, ask it to translate something for you. Siri can translate from English to Chinese, Spanish, French, German, or Italian at the start.
Second, you can dig into the General -> Accessibility settings and toggle a switch that lets you type to Siri instead of talking. Unfortunately, unlike Google, you can't have both speech and typing available at the same time. But if you absolutely hate talking to your phone, you now have the option to switch Siri to a keyboard interface.
Take a screenshot
In the past couple years, screenshots have gone from a niche thing a few people do to something everybody does, and so Apple has significantly changed how they work to match how we actually use them.
Now, when you take a screenshot, it throws a little thumbnail down into the lower-lefthand corner. From there, you can swipe it away to save it. But if you tap it, you get an entirely new little mini app. It lets you crop it and annotate it with a suite of little markers and pens and such. If you're doing it on an iPad, you can use the Apple Pencil for more precise annotations.
From there, you can save it, delete it, or share it directly using iOS's standard share sheet.
Download some Augmented Reality apps
Apple's augmented reality system for the iPhone promises to be a blast. You'll be able to measure your room, sure, but you'll also be able to put a T. rex in it and play some incredible games on your coffee table.
It's all built off something called ARKit, Apple's system for allowing developers to map digital objects into physical space on your screen. It's not a full-on virtual reality headset on your face, but it's remarkably good at taking some basic understanding of surfaces it can see through the camera and putting stuff on them through your phone's screen.
It's much too early to know whether AR apps are going to be more than a fun trick to play around with for a few minutes before you forget about it — though that's been the way many AR and VR things have gone. But Apple's famous for getting developers on board with really good apps, we expect the same will be true in iOS 11.
Turn Live Photos back on
If you've turned off Live Photos on your iPhone because you didn't really see the point, turn them back on. For one thing, Apple's new system for encoding photos and video means they're going to take up a lot less of your iPhone's storage going forward. This new feature probably won't get very much attention, but it's a big deal because you're going to be less likely to run out of space than you were before.
But mainly, there are neat new features that make Live Photos worth another look. You can still see the tiny little video that's taken when you take a Live Photo by force pressing on the image. But now, you can actually do stuff with that little clip. When you're looking at a photo, you can swipe up on it to bring up new options for your Live Photo, including making it loop, bounce back and forth through time, or show a "long exposure."
Sharing these little clips is still a bit of a hassle, but it's better than it was before. They get saved as MOV files, which should work on most social networks. If you want a GIF, there's always Google's Motion Stills app.
And if you are buying one of the newer iPhones, you'll want to make sure you check out the new Portrait Lighting feature on the iPhone 8 and iPhone X.
Just look around at the new design
You've probably been doing this already, but take a minute to look at the new design you'll see all over the place. Apps now have these giant headers that make it easier to get a sense of what you're looking at, so they work better on larger screens. Like any design change, the differences in iOS 11 are polarizing, but I generally like it better than before. Apple made a huge shift way back in iOS 7, but with iOS 11 it feels like everything's been a little softened.
If you really want to get a sense of the vibe that Apple is going for (and, therefore, what many of the other apps you use are going to look like soon), take a tour through the Apple News app and especially the newly redesigned App Store.
Apple has basically turned the App Store into a tiny little magazine for apps. There's a "Today" tab for featuring apps, complete with little articles about them. Games are finally separated out from utility apps, so the top charts aren't completely dominated by them. You'll see how buttons are more clearly defined as buttons instead of bare words floating in a white expanse.
For better or worse (and mostly for the better), the App Store is the clearest indication of where Apple's software design is headed, so it's worth your time to poke around in it for a bit. Plus, you know, that's where the apps are. You should download some.
Wrapping up
Back in June, I called iOS 11 "the most ambitious software update from Apple in a very, very long time." After using the final version that's going to be shipping out to everybody today, I still think that's true.
Apple's real accomplishment with iOS 11 is evolving iOS to the point where the same basic OS works on iPads, iPhones, and iPhones with weirdly shaped screens. Heck, even the Apple TV technically is iOS underneath tvOS and it, too, is quite easy to understand.
They are all distinct devices with user interfaces that feel native without being confusing. The iPad isn't just a blown-up iPhone anymore, but everything you know from using the iPhone also works on the iPad. The same, I suspect, will apply to the iPhone X. Creating a consistent UI across different form factors is not easy to do. And though there are differences, they feel natural.
More than anything, I'm excited to see Apple begin to finally experiment with adding some real complexity to the interface of iOS. It's nearly impossible to make a computing platform more powerful without also making it more complex. And so, Apple has made iOS more complex than it was before. It is just a little harder to find your bearings than it was before, especially on the iPad.
But to Apple’s credit, it's not so much more complex that we can't figure it out, nor do I think it's more complex than Android. And once you do find your bearings, you'll discover that you're able to do much more than you could before.
In fact, I expect we'll look back and wonder why we lived with iOS being so simplistic for so long.

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TALLAHASSEE - Deadly carbon monoxide fumes have killed 11 people in Florida as Hurricane Irma’s death toll rose to 42 on Tuesday, state officials reported.

The numbers are also preliminary, as there are several known deaths still not included on the state’s official list, such as the eight elderly people who died after their nursing home in Hollywood lost air conditioning and the nine deaths reported in Monroe County. The Broward deaths have sparked a criminal investigation.

The list released by the the Division of Emergency Management is based on reports confirmed and attributed by county medical examiners and reported to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

The latest update shows that recovering from the storm continues to be more deadly than the monster Category 4 winds and rain. In addition to the 11 people who succumbed to carbon monoxide poisoning, often caused from the deadly fumes from generators, the state reports that nine died from blunt trauma or injury, including those involved in car accidents.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/weather/hurricane/article174097351.html?#emlnl=Breaking_Newsletter#storylink=cpy

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The Moon is about to do something it only does once every 28 years. September 18th, 2017 at 6:53 PM 🌚 The total solar eclipse that occurred this summer drew incredible excitement from even casual sky gazers, but our moon is about to perform a feat that is much more rare, and you probably haven’t heard anything about it. Our only natural satellite is about to block out a trio of planets and a dominant star all over the course of a single day.

The event is known as a lunar occultation, which is really just a fancy way of saying that the moon is going to obscure some stuff in the sky. For observers here on Earth, the moon will appear to swallow up Venus, Mars, and Mercury, as well as the star Regulus, which is one of the brightest in our night sky.

What makes it particularly interesting for astronomers is that it’s extremely rare for so many celestial bodies to be involved at the same time. Occultations involving a single body or planet are relatively common, but this particular combination only happens once every 28 years or so. By comparison, a total solar eclipse happens somewhere on Earth every couple of years.

As with the eclipse, certain spots on Earth will have a better vantage point than others. For those hoping to snag a glimpse of the moon engulfing Mars, Hawaii is a great place to be, while locations in the South Pacific have the best shot at spotting Mercury slipping behind the moon later this evening. For the rest of us, searching for cool photos on Instagram and Twitter will probably be our best shot at enjoying the stellar sights.

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Intensifying Hurricane Maria is a severe threat to Caribbean and Puerto Rico; Jose to scrape Northeast coast - The Washington Post

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- Hurricane Maria is now a Category 5 storm, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said Monday evening.

Air Force Reserve aircraft data indicates that Maria has intensified into an "extremely dangerous" storm with maximum winds of 160 mph with higher gusts, the center said.

The storm was on a path that would take it near many of the islands already wrecked by Hurricane Irma and then on toward Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. Maria could hit Puerto Rico on Wednesday, said Ernesto Morales with the U.S. National Weather Service in San Juan.
"This storm promises to be catastrophic for our island," he said. "All of Puerto Rico will experience hurricane force winds."

Hurricane warnings were issued for Puerto Rico, Culebra, Vieques, the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Kitts, Nevis, Montserrat and Martinique. A tropical storm warning was issued for Antigua and Barbuda, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Maarten, St. Lucia and Anguilla.
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