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Jonathan Key
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Unlike nearly everyone else I know, I joined Google+ before I joined Twitter. And definitely unlike everyone else I know, I joined Google+ before I joined Facebook: I never have, and don't suppose I ever will, use Facebook. Easy decision, it seemed to me.

Actually, I joined Twitter years ago (www.twitter.com/jonathan_k) and never saw the value of it. I belatedly picked it up a few months ago (I can't even remember now what prompted me) and, oh, I finally got it.

Through the London Olympics, it was a joy: an absolute supplement to the pleasure of being a Londoner during those happy weeks. Now I really get it: it's not for sharing information, it's for sharing moments. Twitter means most when it's helping you to share (gulp) feelings. Frankly, it's as impossible to share feelings in 140 characters as it is in 14,000, so it rightly focuses on capturing the fleeting moment of feeling the feeling, rather than the content of the feeling itself.

Now, seriously, to try to work out what Google+ is best at.
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Twitter is old media

When I referenced Twitter switching off RSS access in a post the other day, I was probably a little kind to them, observing instead that XML had had its day.

What's become clear about this is that Twitter are switching off any kind of anonymous access to their API, restricting it to OAuth-identified server-to-server requests. Overnight, Twitter are no longer a platform. They're a media company with carefully monitored access agreements.

I find it interesting to examine my response to this: I feel disappointed, as they're explicitly making money off my content now. That wasn't the bargain Twitter made with me six years ago, and the one I've come to rely on. (Though Google+ also doesn't allow RSS, I knew the game from the start there, and I have at least +Brian Fitzpatrick and the data liberation front to reassure me.)

Twitter's bait-and-switch, now they've built their reach on the back of eager early adopters, is disappointing. It marks them as part of old, unenlightened, business, and consigns them to a far less remarkable place in the future economy than they otherwise might have had.

I think it was +Jeff Jarvis who observed around the time of the Olympics that Twitter have become an old-style media company. These actions validate that completely. Twitter is turning into cable TV.

I'll probably still use Twitter, the distribution is helpful. But how I use it changed. I'm no longer part of a supporting ecosystem, but a customer with an arm's-length relationship. I trust them as much as I do Comcast, Verizon or AT&T. Which is to say, hardly at all.
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Seven years ago, on 6th July 2005, London won the right to host the 2012 Olympics. A nation was surprised and delighted.

The very next day, four alienated and misguided young men set off bombs in London's transport network, killing dozens and injuring hundreds more. It was a dark, fretful time that lent doubt to the viability of a multicultural Britain.

The week after the bombings, the then Mayor of London, Ken Livingstone, spoke at a service in Trafalgar Square.

We remember what he said that day as, last night, for the second time in a week, Britain united in celebration of Mo Farah, the son of Somali refugees, pride of Britain.

Well done Mo: Londoner, muslim, Great Briton, double Olympic champion, inspiration.

But also well done Ken, for being right to hold to a united London.

Well done London, for being the city that manages multitudes.

Well done Britain, for aiming high. A nation still surprised and delighted.

Ken Livingstone: London United
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World Premiere of Margaret Dickinson's "Builders and the Games" (with director's Q&A) at the East End Film Festival today at 1.30pm: http://www.eastendfilmfestival.com/programme/1707/builders-and-the-games
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Extraordinary effort by Alex Hales to make a difficult run-chase look (relatively) easy. He looked gutted to be out one short of a rare T20 century, but presumably wise heads will tell him that it was the 99 runs beforehand that impressed.
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A delicate piece from Adam Gopnik on the timeless appeal of The Beatles, and which, incidentally, correctly identifies the double-A side of Strawberry Fields Forever/Penny Lane as their most enduring work (or, perhaps better, the finest 45 ever released).
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A good article by John Harris about the most extraordinary songwriter of the rock & roll generation.

The extent to which Macca is mocked, sneered at or ignored is quite bewildering. Look at his song catalogue and weep. Even the professed hatred of some for his "chirpiness" is, at base, jealousy. I do like David Quantick's takedown of this tendency (in his book on The White Album):

"If you don't like Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da," you are an enemy of pleasure, melody, and humanity. Be careful, non-lovers of "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da", you may be Lou Reed."

Harsh on Mr Reed, but you see the point he's after.

The only mystery in John Harris' overview of McCartney's last ten years of work is the complete blanking of his work as The Fireman, including the rightly hailed album Electric Arguments. Now there's an album you wouldn't be expecting someone in his sixties to make.
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Australia will increase its number of marine reserves from 27 to 60. Great news, but still, to coin a phrase, a drop in the ocean globally.
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Mary Meeker goes big on "reimagining". Great when that means completely rethinking the user relationship with a particular task (or redefining the task). Not so great when it turns out to mean "putting a filter on your photos".
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