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5 Simple Ways to Reduce Your Practice's Administrative Burden
"Administrative tasks are such a great use of my time!" said no provider ever. Many smaller medical and behavioral health practices try to do everything themselves.  Because of this, it is inevitable that problems will arise.  Managing operations, answering...
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8 Key Questions to Ask Potential EHR Vendors
You understand the differences between an EHR and EMR system and you probably secretly accept that an EHR solution would help your organization.  However, the thoughts of transitioning to one can be daunting - if not outright overwhelming!  Take a deep brea...
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10 Advantages of an EHR System for Behavioral Health Professionals
When EMR software first hit the market, it was generally designed for medical specialties and not really for behavioral and mental health professionals.  Fortunately over the years, EHR systems have evolved into practical solutions that meet the technologic...
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Top 4 Challenges Facing Behavioral Health Organizations
A 2015 survey cited four of the biggest challenges facing behavioral health organizations were centered around an organization's culture, administrative tasks, regulatory compliance and collaborating with external sources for billing or client care. With th...
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EHR versus EMR - What's the difference?
Most behavioral health specialists today are
familiar with the terms EHR and EMR.  In
our current healthcare industry the terms tend to be used interchangeably,
however, there is a difference. What is an EMR? An EMR or
electronic medical record
is a digital...
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David Barbe, president of the AMA discusses the ups and downs of MACRA and MIPS (https://hubs.ly/H08LDRP0)

With these programs, the federal government is beginning to harmonize programs to simplify reporting, decrease the number of measures and potential penalties – and adding an upside opportunity for the solid performers.

“We have a better framework to go forward,” said Barbe, “It’s increasingly looking at the value that care brings. That can be in terms of economic savings. It can be in terms of improved quality. It can be in terms of better interaction between physicians and patients.”

While Barbe said that the Meaningful Use EHR incentive initiative was “a dream program” that was not exactly workable for doctors, MACRA and MIPS are more feasible.

With the new MACRA and MIPS quality reporting initiatives, the government “packages them in a way that is more rational and somewhat easier for physicians to report.”

The goal for MACRA and MIPS, as he sees it, is to simplify the reporting, decrease the number of measures, lower the potential penalty – and reward the better performers.
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The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT last Thursday revealed two changes to its certification criteria that they say are designed to reduce the burden on the industry and make the meaningful use program more efficient.

The first is making more than half of test procedures self-declarable and the second is more discretion around randomized surveillance of certified health IT products.

ONC policy directors wrote that 30 of the 55 criteria were intended to support CMS Quality Payment Program (https://hubs.ly/H08LByX0) and those are now self-declaration only. Valuable time will be saved not having to test with an ONC-Authorized Testing Laboratory.

The second change states the ONC will not audit the ACBs for compliance with randomized surveillance requirements. This will allow the ACBs to prioritize complaint-driven, or reactive, surveillance and allow them to devote their resources to certifying health IT to the 2015 Edition.

ONC said that these changes are intended to ease the burden on health IT developers and certification bodies so they can focus more on interoperability.
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Welcome to the Team! https://hubs.ly/H08L6cF0
Welcome to the Team!
Welcome to the Team!
blog.inforiainc.com
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CMS is redesigning its Innovation Center (CMMI) to give providers greater flexibility in payment models while encouraging greater competition among healthcare systems to drive down cost.

“This administration plans to lead the Innovation Center in a new direction,” said CMS Administrator Seema Verma in an op-ed published in The Wall Street Journal.

CMMI came out of the Affordable Care Act and introduced new models shifting payment from to value-based and from fee-for-service. However CMS is now looking for feedback on what models work and which ones don’t. It will accept comments through Nov. 20.

CMS wants to see more competition between providers to compete for patients in a free market system. Transparency is needed for consumers to be more cost-conscious, she said.

CMS says that CMMI’s new direction is to promote patient-centered care and test market-driven reforms to empower beneficiaries as consumers, provide price transparency, increase choices and competition, reduce cost and improve outcomes.

To be assured consideration, CMMI requests comments to be submitted online or by email to CMMI_NewDirection@cms.hhs.gov through 11:59 p.m. EST November 20, 2017
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Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston have found clinical data more reliable than claims statistics for measuring incidences of sepsis.

The findings, published Wednesday in JAMA (https://hubs.ly/H08F_8L0), questioned the use of claims data for sepsis surveillance and concluded clinical surveillance using EHR data provides more objective estimates of sepsis incidence and outcomes.

After reviewing EHR (https://hubs.ly/H08G0rL0) data from nearly 3 million patients admitted to 409 U.S. hospitals in 2014, researchers found sepsis was present in six percent of all hospitalizations and in more than one in three hospitalizations that ended in death.

Using this data to gauge how many people were affected nationwide, they estimated there were approximately 1.7 million sepsis cases nationwide in 2014, and, of those, 270,000 died.

EHR-based clinical surveillance also provides more credible estimates of sepsis trends compared with claims, which can be biased by changing diagnosis and coding practices over time.
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