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Neil Hodges (竹下憲二)
3,057 followers -
You probably don't want me in your circles.
You probably don't want me in your circles.

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I can't wait until my next big tour!
My first bike tour of more than two days was this ride across the Washington section of the ACA Northern Tier a couple weeks ago.  This involved 496 miles of unsupported riding and camping, as well as a few Warm Showers and other hosted accommodations.  I hadn't camped before and was a bit paranoid about it, but this trip showed me how easy and awesome it is!

The mountains (including five passes) really weren't that hard, but my bike's gearing was much lower than stock thanks to past experience.

Albums: http://www.flickr.com/photos/105592384@N07/collections/72157651439276173/
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For months, brake cables on bike share bike have been cut all over the city, posing a very serious safety hazard for users. If someone didn’t realize they had no brakes until they were already moving, they could be put in serious danger. Endangering the lives of random strangers is very disturbing behavior, and I hope the person in this video is identified and gets the help they need.
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Nevertheless, the Post piece is a perfect illustration of how driving isolates us from our environment and distorts our perception of safety. Consider, for example, the assertion that “not every violation is a hazard.” Actually every violation is a hazard; that’s why they’re called “violations” and not “mitzvahs.” Sure, when you’re behind the wheel of a car, those “No Parking Here to Corner” signs may seem like arbitrary rules placed there merely to annoy and inconvenience you, but the fact is you’re driving a ton or more of heavy machinery around a crowded city, not playing a game of Sorry! So, when you decide to park there anyway because “not every violation is a hazard,” there’s more on the line than whether or not you get a ticket. What you’re really doing is obscuring the sight lines for all the cyclists, pedestrians, and drivers who are attempting to safely navigate that intersection. And the consequences can be fatal.



Drivers: If you’ve never encountered a stopped car while cycling in a bike lane, you have no idea how jarring it actually is. We prefer not to ride in the car lane for the same reason you prefer not to idle in it: Other drivers tend to lose their shit when they think somebody’s slowing them down. So instead you sit in our lane and make it our problem, cavalierly commandeering our lifeline. Using the bike lane as your personal layover zone is basically hitching a ride on a humanitarian aid plane and snacking on the airdrop boxes.



Ah yes, certainly nobody cycling in the bike lane could be doing something as important as picking up a child. People sometimes accuse cyclists of being “entitled,” but there is no road user more entitled than the motorist, and there is no motorist more entitled than one who’s running late for child pickup or drop-off. When the precious offspring is in transit, regular driver selfishness gives way to solipsism, and everyone else must assume just a little more risk in order to accommodate them. For example, every parent who blocks a bike lane or insists on double-parking because they can’t be bothered to find a legal spot and walk a few blocks to the school contributes to the utter shitshow that is the school at arrival and dismissal time, which in turn makes the streets more dangerous for everybody, especially the children.



All of this is complicated by the fact that the automobile completely shuts off our ability to engage in introspection or to question our own behavior. If I ride my bike into Manhattan and get stuck in a downpour, I think to myself, “Damn, should have taken the subway,” and next time I check the weather forecast before heading out. Motorists, however, will steer their cars right into the same traffic jam day after day without ever questioning their poor decision to drive. It’s like Groundhog Day, only without the eventual catharsis. Instead, they’ll look for someone else to blame (cyclists are a popular scapegoat), and they’ll inconvenience everyone else in the process by violating their right of way…
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It's been too long since my last long ride. I didn't even plan for it to be this long and didn't pack enough food, so I was suffering when I got back home. Next time, I won't make that mistake.

Album: https://www.flickr.com/photos/105592384@N07/sets/72157696972191772
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The National Institute for Transportation and Communities in Portland, Oregon, recently conducted an exhaustive survey of e-bike owners in North America. One of the takeaways was that the vast majority — 93.4%, in fact — of e-bike riders were already riding non-motorized bikes as adults before making the switch. And perhaps not surprisingly, those people ended up riding their e-bikes more often than their non-motorized bikes, and frequently cited a desire to use their cars less often as a primary reason why they bought an e-bike in the first place. E-bikes didn’t create that desire, mind you; that was already there. But according to the survey, those helpful motors eliminated the perceived obstacles that kept them from ditching their cars earlier, such as hilly terrain, excessive distance, medical conditions, and the lack of utility that usually comes with bikes that are geared more for sport.
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I sure love looking at old railroad maps.
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There’s already a cottage industry of people who specialize in lawsuits resulting from bike accidents, including a growing cadre of attorneys and forensic experts who specialize in carbon fiber. Now that use of the material, once reserved for high-end bikes, has become widespread in the bike industry, reports of accidents and mysterious failures are on the rise. Kowal’s case signals that bike manufacturers—even overseas brands—may now be held accountable. The result could be a dramatic spike in the number of lawsuits brought against makers of carbon-fiber bike parts.



That’s a question Philip W. Coats, an attorney in San Diego, set out to answer when he represented a client whose front fork shattered. Coats obtained documents from the Chinese manufacturer (a settlement agreement forbids him from naming the company). Using a Mandarin translator, he found that the factory had no standards on how carbon fiber is produced. No rules restricted how thick it should be or how much impact it needed to absorb in a collision, Coats said.

It’s not that all carbon fiber is dangerous. When made well, carbon fiber can be tougher than steel and quite safe. But when made incorrectly, carbon-fiber components can easily break. The parts are built by layering fibrous carbon that’s bound together with resin. If the manufacturer skimps on the resin or simply applies it unevenly, gaps can form, making it susceptible to cracks. Those fissures can spread from an innocuous collision, like the impact of a bike lock or simply from landing hard coming off a curb. Over days or sometimes years, the fracture spreads until, in many cases, the material shatters. Time is often the crucial element.
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The U.S. Trade Representative has approved the inclusion of e-bikes and e-bike motors on the list of $16 billion worth of Chinese products that will be hit with a 25 percent tariff starting Aug. 23.
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Looks like Dia-Compe has brought back SunTour's Command Shifter.
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First, the raw materials. Steel and aluminum prices are already being affected by this tariff, and those raw materials are part of almost everything on bicycles. Tires, cables, cable housings, and more items that you will need going forward are going up in price. The tariff is possibly going to be 25%, so expect significant rises in prices on these goods.

Secondly, even if steel and aluminum is produced here, the prices will be higher. Why? Because manufacturers here will raise their prices to be just slightly less than the affected Chinese goods and they will still be competitive in the marketplace. Demand will go for the lesser priced materials and the US suppliers will make more money as a result.
Trade Wars
Trade Wars
g-tedproductions.blogspot.com
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