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The digestible energy content of beet pulp is approximately 11 MJ/kg and the energy content of oats is approx. 13 MJ/kg. Beet pulp is a highly digestible fibre source and improves the quality of roughage fed to horses. It is safe to feed and will not upset hindgut bacterial populations. Feeding large meals of oats (more than 2kg in a single meal) can disturb the hindgut bacteria, causing digestive upset.
Check out our low starch, low sugar beet pulp , HYGAIN MICRBEET here: http://www.hygain.com.au/feeds/micrbeet/
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Adult horses eating manure is not common yet several factors can lead to this. Horses with diets that are low in fibre (roughage), high in grains or deficient in protein, may eat manure. Factors include if horses are starving (hunger can be caused by lack of protein) or bored. Horses’ stomachs continually produce acid so if they do not have any roughage to chew, they may start eating their own manure.

Check out some common nutrient deficiencies. http://www.hygain.com.au/nutrient-deficiencies-in-equine-diets/
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Cereal grain roughages are harvested from grains, often late in the season and have therefore a low nutrient content. Oaten and wheaten hay and chaff may contain seed kernels, which are very high in starch. As such, horses that are insulin resistant, overweight, have been diagnosed with ulcers, or have suffered from laminitis should not be fed cereal roughages to limit the amount of starches and sugars in the horse’s diet.

More on managing horses with ulcers here: http://www.hygain.com.au/ulcers-horses/
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Happy March!!!
"This is the story (a rather long one so brace yourself) about "Slider", my quarter horse mare. For those who follow Quarter Horse bloodlines, she is the Granddaughter of Two Eyed Chap and Mr Jesse James.
My beautiful girls story begins Christmas time 6 years ago. Being Christmas I went away for two days, only to come home and find her hopping on three legs and severely caring one of her fronts. She had managed to have a rather large altercation with the fence and had a wound that spiralled from the bottom of her knee all the way down around the fetlock, and down into the wall of her hoof.
I was instantly devastated, as I could see that it wasn't gonna be pretty news from the vet. You could literally see her sliced tendons and ligaments as well as the bone.
The vet arrived and after the inspection, he suggested that I put her to sleep as a chances of her ever being able to walk again very slim to none. It's not very often that I don't take the advice of my vet, but there was just something about the sparkle in her eye that just touched my soul. It felt like she was saying "Please Mum, just give me a chance!". After a quick think and a very heavy discussion with my vet, I decided no matter how much everyone told me I couldn't save her, I was going to. It wasn't about the money, it wasn't about winning titles, it was just about me saving my best mate. I was happy if I could just help her enough that it meant that she live her days out in my paddock happily and comfortably.
Time seemed to stand still, and the bandages, the dressings, the needles, the painkillers and Grandads good old healing recipe, all just starting to seem so much, but to me she still had that sparkle in her eye. I'm not going to lie, there were days that I seriously started to question myself and my decision, but then it happened. Almost 12 months to the day, she finally started to bare weight on the injured leg/hoof. I remember my vet saying to me whilst shaking his head "This horse is gonna send you broke, you know this is only the beginning right?".
After another 9 months of home remedies and a physio program I had put together for her with the help of a couple of professionals, she started to trot and canter, and did it fairly comfortably. Not only had I surprised myself but her vet was absolutely gobsmacked!
After about another 5 months of watching her behaviour in the paddock the vet suggested to me that I start her off with some light work to see if she could carry a bit of weight without going lame. He was worried that she was gonna self-destruct if she didn't start doing something as she had so much energy and was feeling so fantastic. So we proceeded with putting her into light work, it started to look like maybe she wouldn't just be a paddock horse any more, maybe she might be able to take kids on small rides etc. Her work consisted of small rides four times a week then she would have a week off from riding. With my dad shoeing her and balancing her foot correctly, it seemed like nothing could hold her back. She just had so much want and so much try.
This year she has proven just how much want and how much try she really has. After her getting the all clear to compete, halfway through this Barrel Racing season I decided to start patterning her as I could only go steady myself due to recovering from a broken knee and a acute ACL injury. Our season ended last weekend and she placed as the runner-up for the 3rd Division Title. But get this, she wasn't happy cruising along in the 3rd Division. The only reason she placed as runner-up for the 3D title was because she started to run faster and faster, placing up in the 1st and 2nd Divisions!
So ALL that being said, I entered photos of Slider into the Hygain calendar competition this year not only because I love Hygain and use it religiously but because I believe Slider is a true champion win, lose or draw. My little Chestnut that could just never give up, and I'm so proud of my decision not to give up on her. "
by Kelly R. #hygainphoto calendar winner
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• According to a study done in 2005 of racing horses, show horses and performance sport horses – 87% of them suffered from gastric ulcers (stomach ulcers)
Did you know – Gastric Ulcers can be classified into grades
• Grade 0 – Normal, un-ulcerated tissue. The epithelium is intact, and there is no thickening or abnormal colouring
• Grade 1 – The mucous lining is intact, but there are areas of thickened, discoloured tissue
• Grade 2 – Small, single or multiple ulcers present
• Grade 3 – Large, single or multiple ulcers present
• Grade 4 – Extensive, deep ulcers present

Learn more about gastric ulcers here: http://www.hygain.com.au/ulcers-horses/
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Wheat bran has approximately 8% Sugar and 22% Starch, this makes a non-structural carbohydrate content of 30% which is way too high for a horse suffering from metabolic issues.
Check out some more effective feeding techniques for weight gain here: http://www.hygain.com.au/fact-sheet-3-step-weight-gain-strategy-for-your-horse/
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Traditional fibre sources such as hay and chaff (insoluble) are poorly utilized, which often means that horse owners are required to feed more starches and sugars in the form of grain in order to meet the horse’s energy requirements.
However, there is a more natural solution to increase the calorie content of your horse's diet. Alternative fibre sources, such as lupin hulls, soy bean hulls and beet pulps (all contained in FIBRESSENTIAL®) are highly digestible and provide digestible energy between that of good quality hay and grains.
HYGAIN® FIBRESSENTIAL® does not only contain the three super fibres, but also provides:
• Superior conditioning
• Guaranteed nutritional values all year around
• Reduced sugar levels
• Balanced Calcium to Phosphorous ratio
• Significantly reduces the dust often associated with traditional forms of chaff
• Suitable chaff replacer

http://www.hygain.com.au/feeds/fibressential/

Talk to your local HYGAIN stockist about FIBRESSENTIAL® today
or give us a call on 03 5943 2255.
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Keratin is a family of fibrous structural proteins. Keratin is the key structural material making up the outer layer of human skin. It is also the key structural component of hair and nails. Keratin monomers assemble into bundles to form intermediate filaments, which are tough and form strong unmineralized tissues found in reptiles, birds, amphibians, and mammals.

More info on supporting your horse's hooves here: http://www.hygain.com.au/feeds/gleam/
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Research shows that the starch in micronized grains can be up to 95% digested in the horse’s small intestine whereas the starch in whole, cracked or steam-rolled cereal grains such as barley or maize is only 20-40% digested.
Learn more about better feeding practices here: http://www.hygain.com.au/micronizing-improved-feed-efficiency/
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Thanks to the feedback of our wonderful HYGAIN fans, we have updated the design of our HYGAIN Dippers! Now featuring the HYGAIN Dipper Guide printed directly on the scoop, as a quick reference to the amount of feed our HYGAIN dippers can hold when filled up to the top.*

Our new & improved HYGAIN Dippers are available on our online store now!

http://www.hygain.com.au/product/dippers/

Grab your new dipper here.

*Please note, intended as a guide only, feeds must be weighed before feeding out.
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