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Chris Adams

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“In the late summer of 2002, the public began hearing about the mounting WMD menace as the reason we had to invade Iraq. But that was not the reason. Plans for the invasion had already been underway for months. The war was already coming; the “reason” for war just had to catch up.

Everyone who was around then knows it. You can look it up. And we had damned well better not forget it, in a fog of faux remorseful “Knowing what we now know...” sanitized history.”
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In comments sure to rankle customers, a GM attorney said Tuesday the company believes the software that controls every vehicle function belongs to them.
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For all that we love post-apocalyptic doomsday scenarios, people usually behave far better in real life than we fear
Villages and towns in the Himalayan foothills are the hardest hit. This week's aftershock made it even more challenging to get aid to those in need. But ordinary folks are figuring out how to help.
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Of all the recent memorial coverage for Terry Pratchett, this collection of experiences from Charlie Stross really stands out for its humanity
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1920s #infosec: “When choosing a key word never choose one which is associated with the project with which one is engaged”

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/coast-guards-most-potent-weapon-during-prohibition-codebreaker-elizebeth-friedman-180954066/
A pioneer of her time, Friedman was a crucial part of the fight to enforce the ban on booze
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Yeah, much as I oppose prohibition I have trouble feeling sorry for the actual mobsters who knew exactly what the stakes were.
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08.13.2014 · Green Arabia. It was a dark day when Islam met the loudspeaker. All travelers to the Middle East discover that this normally self-assured religion gets insecure in the small hours of night and feels it has to rehearse its foundational beliefs, in public, at 190 dB. Hey, wake up.
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“The conclusion was clear, Mullainathan explains: poverty itself taxes the mind. And in the case of the Indian farmers, he adds, the data were even more convincing: unlike the New Jersey “lab” study, where subjects were compared to other people, the farmers were compared to themselves. The only variables that had changed were their financial circumstances.”
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Katmandu was an intensely ornate city that is easily damaged. The carvings, details, public spaces were glorious. My heart goes out to its citizens who suffer with their city. As you can see from these images I took in 1976, the medieval town has been delicate for decades. Loosely stacked bricks are everywhere. One can also see what splendid art has been lost. Not all has been destroyed, and I am sure the Nepalis will rebuild as they have in the past. Still, the earthquake shook more than just buildings. 

If you look carefully you may notice something unusual about these photos. They show no cars, pedicabs, or even bicycles. At the time I took these images, Katmandu was an entirely pedestrian city. Everyone walked everywhere. Part of why I loved it. That has not been true for decades, so this is something else that was lost long ago. Also missing back then was signage. There are few signs for stores, or the typical wordage you would see in any urban landscape today. Katmandu today is much more modern, much more livable, or at least it was. 

Blessings on you, Katmandu!
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Every day, we read about another woman who has thrown in the towel. A woman who's left her team, or her company, or her industry, fed up with the constant exhaustion of having to continually deal with sexism in the technology industry. And there are doubtlessly many many more who leave silently, without a high-profile exit. How many women (or trans* people, or minority ethnicities, or...) leaving the industry—or worse, never entering it—over this shit are we prepared to tolerate? Even if they don't leave, how many lives are willing to make miserable? How many careers are we willing to stunt through fear, anger, and distress?

I want to make one thing perfectly clear, especially to my fellow white straight cis-males: I'm not OK with this. Not by a very long way. As a manager, I want to make it quite clear that any team under my management will have zero tolerance for sexism, racism and transphobia, in whatever form they come. If I see it, I will call it out. If you want to do it, move elsewhere (ideally out of my company, or even better out of CS altogether). This applies as well for teams, groups, or conferences I participate in, but don't manage: if I see it, I will say it. If it continues, I am done with you and I will do everything in my power to never have to work with you again, at my current or any future company.

I beg all of you to watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaqpoeVgr8U, a video made in the face of (yet another) sexual misbehaviour scandal in the Australian army. It is by far one of the most powerful anti-sexism messages ever spoken. I literally have a calendar reminder set to watch this every few months, because it is so powerful and resonates with me so strongly. It's a refreshing reminder of what a powerful anti-sexism message can look like.

Watch it, and if you take nothing else away from David Morrison's speech, take away this: "The standard you walk past is the standard you accept". It doesn't matter if you're not doing it (making the jokes, performing the microaggressions, belittling the contributions); it matters that you allow it to happen. By allowing it to happen, without stepping in, you are giving it your implicit approval, and letting it take root and grow. The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.

For the managers reading this, remember his followup: "That goes for all of us, but especially those who, by their rank, have a leadership role". As managers, some of us have a unique ability and responsibility. Do not let this fester in your team. If it festers in your team, it spreads, and the whole of your team, your company, and your industry all become lesser places for it.

Don't be silent. We, as individuals and as an industry, need to root this rot out and destroy it. It will take all of us, and I promise to do what I can.

Author's note: this is an edited version of something I posted internally at Google.
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Check out my latest short story, "Second Birthday", which has just been published in Analog.
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Enormous damage to the U.S., nothing to make us safer – the only beneficiaries were the tortuous hucksters who parlayed a misunderstanding of psychology into $80M and every user of torture around the world who gained the ability to say “we're just doing what they do”:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/10/world/senate-torture-report-shows-cia-infighting-over-interrogation-program.html
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The last couple years have been the best experience I've had with an ISP: the service has been rock-solid, delivers the advertised speeds, the install tech showed up promptly & knew what he was doing and I've never once had to call customer support to get an honest bill (a regular occurrence with Comcast).
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reviewed 4 months ago
Tasty beer and appetizers, decent prices and a great view on the deck overlooking the beach
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Takoma finally has a coffee option to compare with DC's best!
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great selection and the monthly tastings are a great way to survey a wide variety of options
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reviewed a year ago
30 reviews
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Good pizza and location but we sharply reduced our visits when they banned dogs from the patio
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great beer and food; if only the location was more metro-accessible…
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
The ingredients are obviously top notch but I rarely stop by because the recipes are so bland. This can work with something like gazpacho where all of the flavor comes from really fresh ingredients but otherwise double the spice!
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago