Profile

Cover photo
Hawaii Daydreams
8,453 followers|5,534,231 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
32
2
Island Style Clothing's profile photoСергей Синоренко's profile photoClaudio Giovannetti 2's profile photo
 
Great vid.
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
98
28
LEANNE MICALLEF's profile photoClaudio Giovannetti 2's profile photoMarco Rolletto's profile photoCharyl L. Gipson's profile photo
2 comments
 
This was my daydream a long time ago!
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
72
13
Claudio Giovannetti 2's profile photoPanos DRAGON (RED DRAGON 7)'s profile photoСергей Синоренко's profile photoAlvaro Bonifacio's profile photo
 
Wow so clear, but don't fancy swimming with him.
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
67
5
matthew bradshaw's profile photoImelda Caballero's profile photoUllieonweb's profile photoDee Dee C's profile photo
4 comments
 
Honolulu baby!!! I stay in agoust 2014....
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
53
10
Patrick Schneider's profile photoXimena Valverde's profile photo
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
83
7
Robin Hunter's profile photoRich Yost's profile photoClaudine Grant's profile photoCharyl L. Gipson's profile photo
 
MUST. GO. THERE. NOW.
Add a comment...
In their circles
1,683 people
Have them in circles
8,453 people
rajan dabhade's profile photo
Jayendra Desai's profile photo
Vinasia Group's profile photo
ellena montana's profile photo
直井美和子's profile photo
Eric Brown's profile photo
Hawaii Towing Company Inc.'s profile photo
Raul Ruvera's profile photo
Kristina R's profile photo

Communities

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
82
11
Subhas Barma's profile photoThowfiqa beevi's profile photoCheri Fowler's profile photoClaudio Giovannetti 2's profile photo
 
Beautiful
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
63
4
Manuela Font's profile photoUllieonweb's profile photoBELM RUIZ's profile photoLinda Odell's profile photo
2 comments
 
Looks very nice!
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
 
#beach  
42
11
Love is life's profile photoFernand L (flamandco)'s profile photogary Indiana's profile photoNatan Falco's profile photo
 
Beautiful!
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
 
Seaside Deck Hawaii
60
10
Jens Fay's profile photoDrAarthi Arulkumar's profile photomatthew bradshaw's profile photoPriya Jain's profile photo
 
Beautiful. Where is this?
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
49
8
Ullieonweb's profile photoHawaii Vacation Travel Tips / Photography's profile photoGerry Grant's profile photoClaudio Giovannetti 2's profile photo
3 comments
 
love it..
Add a comment...

Hawaii Daydreams

Shared publicly  - 
50
5
Ullieonweb's profile photoNana Iv.'s profile photoHawaii Island Recovery's profile photoKimberly Copeland's profile photo
 
My dream too haha.
Add a comment...
People
In their circles
1,683 people
Have them in circles
8,453 people
rajan dabhade's profile photo
Jayendra Desai's profile photo
Vinasia Group's profile photo
ellena montana's profile photo
直井美和子's profile photo
Eric Brown's profile photo
Hawaii Towing Company Inc.'s profile photo
Raul Ruvera's profile photo
Kristina R's profile photo
Communities
Story
Tagline
Paradise on Earth coming to your Google+ feed
Introduction

Hawaii (i/həˈw./ or /həˈwʔ/ in English; HawaiianHawaiʻi) is the most recent of the 50 U.S. states (August 21, 1959), and is the only U.S. state made up entirely of islands. It is the northernmost island group in Polynesia, occupying most of an archipelago in the central Pacific Ocean, southwest of the continental United States, southeast of Japan, and northeast ofAustralia. Hawaii’s diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches and oceanic surrounding, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists alike. Due to its mid-Pacific location, Hawaii has many North American and Asian influences along with its own vibrant native culture. Hawaii has over a million permanent residents along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. Its capital is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu.

The state encompasses nearly the entire volcanic Hawaiian Island chain, which comprises hundreds of islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight "main islands" are (from the northwest to southeast) NiʻihauKauaʻiOʻahuMolokaʻiLānaʻiKahoʻolaweMaui, and Hawaiʻi. The last is by far the largest and is often called "The Big Island" to avoid confusion with the state as a whole. The archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania.

Hawaii is the 8th-least extensive, the 11th-least populous, but the 13th-most densely populated of the 50 United States. Hawaii's coastline is approximately 750 miles (1,210 km) long, which isfourth in the United States after Alaska, Florida, and California.

In standard American English, Hawaii is generally pronounced /həˈw./. In the Hawaiian language, it is generally pronounced [hɐˈwɐiʔi] or [hɐˈvɐiʔi].[citation needed]

Hawaii is one of two states that do not observe daylight saving time, the other being Arizona.

The Hawaiian language word Hawaiʻi derives from Proto-Polynesian *Sawaiki, with the reconstructed meaning "homeland";[7] Hawaiʻi cognates are found in other Polynesian languages, includingMāori (Hawaiki), Rarotongan (ʻAvaiki), and Samoan (Savaiʻi). (See also Hawaiki).

According to Pukui and Elbert,[8] "Elsewhere in Polynesia, Hawaiʻi or a cognate is the name of the underworld or of the ancestral home, but in Hawaiʻi, the name has no meaning."[9]

An archipelago situated some 2,000 mi (3,200 km) southwest of the North American mainland,[20] Hawaii is the southernmost state of the United States and the second westernmost state after Alaska. Only Hawaii and Alaska do not share a border with another U.S. state.

Hawaii is the only state of the United States that is not geographically located in North America, grows coffee, is completely surrounded by water, is entirely anarchipelago, has royal palaces, and does not have a straight line in its state boundary.

Hawaii’s tallest mountain, Mauna Kea, stands at 13,796 ft (4,205 m)[21] but is taller than Mount Everest if followed to the base of the mountain, which, lying at the floor of the Pacific Ocean, rises about 33,500 ft (10,200 m).[22]

The eight main islands, Hawaiʻi, Maui, Oʻahu, Kahoʻolawe, Lanaʻi, Molokaʻi, Kauaʻi and Niʻihau are accompanied by many others. Kaʻala is a small island near Niʻihau that is often overlooked. The Northwest Hawaiian Islands are a series of nine small, older masses northwest of Kauaʻi that extend from Nihoa to Kure that are remnants of once much larger volcanic mountains. There are also more than 100 small rocks and islets, such as Molokini, that are either volcanic, marine sedimentary or erosional in origin, totaling 130 or so across the archipelago.[23]

Geology

All the Hawaiian islands were formed from volcanic activity initiated at an undersea magma source called a hotspot. As the tectonic plate beneath much of the Pacific Ocean moves to the northwest, the hot spot remains stationary, slowly creating new volcanoes. Due to the hotspot’s location, the only active volcanoes are located around the southern half of the Big Island. The newest volcano,ʻihi Seamount, is located south of the Big Island’s coast.

The last volcanic eruption outside the Big Island occurred at Haleakalā on Maui before the late 18th century, though it could have been hundreds of years earlier.[24] In 1790, Kīlauea exploded with the deadliest eruption (of the modern era) known to have occurred in what is now the United States.[25] As many as 5,405 warriors and their families marching on Kīlauea were killed by that eruption.[26]

Volcanic activity and subsequent erosion have created impressive geological features. The Big Island has the third highest point among the world’s islands.[27]

Slope instability of the volcanoes has generated damaging earthquakes with related tsunamis, particularly in 1868 and 1975.[28] Steep cliffs have been caused by catastrophic debris avalanches on the submerged flanks of ocean island volcanos.[29][30]

Flora and fauna

Because the islands are so far from other land habitats, life before human activity is said to have arrived by the “3 W’s”: wind (carried through the air), waves (brought by ocean currents), and wings (birds, insects, and whatever they brought with them). This isolation, and the wide range of environments (extreme altitude, tropical climate) produced a vast array of endemic flora and fauna (seeEndemism in the Hawaiian Islands). Hawaii has more endangered species and has lost a higher percentage of its endemic species than any other U.S. state.[31]

Protected areas
Endemic Silversword near Haleakalāsummit

Several areas in Hawaii are under the protection of the National Park Service.[32] Hawaii has two national parksHaleakala National Park near Kula, on Maui, includes Haleakalā, the dormant volcano that formed east Maui; and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park in the southeast region of the island of Hawaiʻi, which includes the active volcano Kīlauea and its various rift zones.

There are three national historical parksKalaupapa National Historical Park in Kalaupapa, Molokaʻi, the site of a former Hansen’s disease colony; Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park inKailua-Kona on the island of Hawaiʻi; and Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park, an ancient place of refuge. Other areas under the control of the National Park Service include Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail on the Big Island and the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor on Oʻahu.

The Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument was proclaimed by President George W. Bush on June 15, 2006. The monument covers roughly 140,000 square miles (360,000 km2) of reefs, atolls and shallow and deep sea out to 50 miles (80 km) offshore in the Pacific Ocean, larger than all of America’s National Parks combined.[33]

Hawaii’s climate is typical for the tropics, although temperatures and humidity tend to be a bit less extreme due to near-constant trade winds from the east. Summer highs are usually in the upper 80s °F, (around 31 °C) during the day and mid 70s, (around 24 °C) at night. Winter day temperatures are usually in the low to mid 80s, (around 28 °C) and (at low elevation) seldom dipping below the mid 60s (18 °C) at night. Snow, not usually associated with the tropics, falls at 4,205 metres (13,796 ft) on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa on the Big Island in some winter months. Snow rarely falls on Haleakala. Mount Waiʻaleʻale, on Kauaʻi, has the second highest average annual rainfall on Earth, about 460 inches (11.7 m). Most of Hawaii has only two seasons: the dry season from May to October, and the wet season from October to April.[34]

Local climates vary considerably on each island, grossly divisible into windward (Koʻolau) and leeward (Kona) areas based upon location relative to the higher mountains. Windward sides face cloud cover, so resorts concentrate on sunny leeward coasts.