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Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg
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Research and education in the domain of soft nanomaterials
Research and education in the domain of soft nanomaterials

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The Adolphe Merkle Institute's first start-up receives crucial boost

The very first start-up launched at the Adolphe Merkle Institute, Nanolockin, has received support from two important sources. Fri Up will provide business coaching during the crucial launch phase, while Fribourg’s Seed Capital Foundation has granted the company an interest-free loan of CHF 150,000.
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In this week’s Nature Podcast: electric-eel inspired batteries, virus inspired protein shells, and modelling magma viscosity http://go.nature.com/2CgHhYC
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A second article in Nature for AMI

Congratulations to the Adolphe Merkle Institute’s BioPhysics group (Tom Schroeder, Gogol Guha, and Prof. Michael Mayer), which has published an article in the top-ranked science journal on an electric eel inspired power source.

http://ami.swiss/en/seminars-news-events/news/18257/harnessing-the-power-of-the-electric-eel?&cat=2,8,1,6,7,3,9,11,10
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Adolphe Merkle Institute Professors Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser and Alke Fink have been awarded the 2017 CUSSTR Prize for helping improve nanosafety. Read more about it here:

http://ami.swiss/en/seminars-news-events/news/18214/a-prize-for-improved-nanosafety?&cat=2,8,1,6,7,3,9,11,10
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Our Adolphe Merkle Institute website has been upgraded to make it more user- and mobile-friendly. Come and visit to find out more about our activities!
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New in Nature

Researchers at the Adolphe Merkle Institute, the University of Cambridge, and Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, have demonstrated that many types of flowers produce a so-called ‘blue halo’ that produces a blue shine allowing bees to identify them more easily. This color is produced by the nanostructure of a flower’s petal, which scatters light in the blue to ultraviolet spectrum.

http://ami.swiss/en/seminars-news-events/news/18017/blue-halo-helps-bees-find-flowers?&cat=2,8,1,6,7,3,9,11,10

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Adolphe Merkle Institute researchers at the University of Fribourg have highlighted the need to apply complementary analysis methods to study nanoparticle behavior inside cells, pointing to shortfalls in some techniques.

http://ami.swiss/en/media/news/17943/
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Researchers from the Adolphe Merkle Institute (AMI) at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland), Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland (USA), and the University of Chicago (USA), have been awarded two grants from the US and Swiss National Science Foundations that will allow them develop functional materials inspired by some of the most desirable substances found in nature.

http://ami.swiss/en/media/news/17868/
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Our latest Annual Report is now available. Read about our education initiatives, communication, bio-inspiration and exceptional research online here: http://ami.swiss/en/assets/public/files/AnnualReports/AMI_GB_2016_web.pdf
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Tiny, individual crystals on the underside of a Mexican butterfly’s wings give the insect a distinctive green color that allows it to hide from predators. Researchers at the University of Fribourg’s Adolphe Merkle Institute (AMI), the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU) in Germany, and Murdoch University in Western Australia, have shown for the first time how these crystals might grow.

http://ami.swiss/en/media/news/17255/
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