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Stephen Harper has promised an additional $9m for the Office of Religious Freedom - Samane Hemmat looks at how well the ORF has performed so far. 
The ORF was established with the aim of helping religious communities around the world - has it lived up to its mandate so far?
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Martha Ball's profile photoG. Donald Hamilton (gdh)'s profile photo
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Canada has always and religious freedom what Heartless was talking was full of hippocraty ( even the Yaunkree do not know the right word the FRAUDS of Yaunkee shiate) so enjoy the reality and for get the propaganda from the fundamental right wing Christian whore!!!!
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Nepal has a brand new constitution - here's why that's such a big deal.
A decade in the making, Nepal’s new constitution embraces principles of federalism, secularism and inclusion.
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IMF chief Christine Lagarde speaks with Isaac Chotiner in a refreshingly candid interview for The Huffington Post. Touching on a Greek economy in turmoil, the refugee crisis, Hillary Clinton and what it’s like to be a woman speaking in a group forum, Lagarde gives readers a glimpse into life at the head of a global institution. 
The first female IMF chief on the Greek meltdown, a historic refugee crisis and one thing Hillary Clinton has in common with an "old crocodile."
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This week’s foreign policy Munk Debate put the spotlight on all three party leaders’ visions for Canada’s engagement in the world. For the Literary Review of Canada, former UN ambassador Paul Heinbecker looks specifically at Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s track record on international diplomacy, and argues that ‘foreign posturing’ has replaced foreign policy. 
In the current election campaign, the Conservative spin machine is marketing a story of international statesmanship and principled policy, of economic action plans and historic trade agreements, of a rediscovered warrior spirit and newfound hard-nosed diplomacy. Before electoral spin renders campaign hype into enduring “fact,” it is worth examining the broad lines of the Harper …
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The UN Millennium Development Goals are out & the Sustainable Development Goals are in - here's what you need to know:  
World leaders meet in New York this week to discuss the goals that will shape the global agenda until 2030.
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Glenn Davidson was Canada's last ambassador to Syria, and recalls closing the doors of the embassy in 2012. "Today," he writes, "my emotions are less complex but equally profound: sadness at what has happened to this country, horror and disgust at the atrocities being committed, concern for the welfare of the Syrian people, and frustration with the international community’s inability to either help end the fighting or adequately support the refugees."
Canada’s last ambassador to Syria reflects on his departure in 2012 and calls for the government to do more in response to the refugee crisis.
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Christian Mafigiri and Marc Ellison have produced a graphic novel for the Toronto Star, depicting the stories of four former female child soldiers abducted by Joseph Kony’s rebel army in Uganda. The collaboration is a very different – and very effective – way of telling these women’s stories of tragedy and survival. 
Former child soldiers struggle to resume normal life. Four stories are featured in a new online graphic novel treatment.
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Russia joined the Syrian civil war this week, ostensibly with the aim of fighting the Islamic State. It quickly became apparent that airstrikes were instead hitting areas held by anti-government rebels. For Macleans, Michael Petrou looks at how, through his actions in the Middle East, Putin is presenting Russia as ‘an alternative guarantor of world order.’
By entering the Syrian civil war, Russia is asserting itself as a new power in the Middle East—at America’s expense. And everything will be worse for it.
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On inequality, gender, health and Canada's foreign policy: 
Canada helps provide vital services that keep women alive. Then these women return to the same unequal world that almost killed them.
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From Baghdad for the New Yorker, Rania Abouzeid dives into the world of pimps and corrupt police, and the women working in the shadows to help those caught in the sex trade. One of these women is a former rape victim and prostitute: “My wound, my deep wound, is also my strength, because it makes me help others, to be around these pimps, to take them on. Those who bear scars must help the wounded.” 
Islamic militias intensify the dangers of Baghdad’s sex-trafficking underworld. Credit Illustration by Aude Van Ryn
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Signing a Free Trade Agreement does not guarantee opportunities fall into place. The Canada-Korea example explains.
Signing a Free Trade Agreement does not guarantee opportunities fall into place. The Canada-Korea partnership — designated "strategic" — requires innovation, not complacency.
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In the three decades since the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Ken Dornstein – whose brother was killed in the explosion – has made it his mission to track down the mass murderers responsible. His travels to Scotland, Libya and Germany are documented here by Patrick Radden Keefe of The New Yorker. 
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Canada's hub for international affairs.
Introduction
The Canadian International Council (CIC) is an independent, member-based council established to strengthen Canada’s role in international affairs. The CIC reflects the ideas and interests of a broad constituency of Canadians who believe that a country’s foreign policy is not an esoteric concern of experts but directly affects the lives and prosperity of its citizens. The CIC uses its deep historical roots, its cross-country network and its active research program to advance debate on international issues across academic disciplines, policy areas and economic sectors. The CIC’s research program is managed by the national office in Toronto. Its 16 branches across Canada offer CIC members speakers’ programs, study groups, conferences and seminars.
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