Profile

Scrapbook photo 1
Scrapbook photo 2
Scrapbook photo 3
Scrapbook photo 4
Scrapbook photo 5
Luca Luve
1,482 followers|237,402 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Computer-generated art that makes algorithms look like oriental rugs. "Polygons on a grid bloom into intricate patterns that resemble hand-woven rugs and Moorish tile patterns in the generative works of John Green, aka Fleen. Black and white patterns repeat into seeming infinity through an algorithmic system developed with computer software. The pieces show the abundance of possibility, with shapes as simple as triangles and squares becoming ornate colonies of design."
The black and white mosaics of John Green, a.k.a., Fleen, are mesmerizing.
View original post
3
1
Andy Lo's profile photoNorman Robinson's profile photo
Andy Lo
+
1
2
1
 
No matter what kind of art it is, once involved Algorithms, we can see its patterns and visualization.
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
Learning new skills is one of the best ways to make yourself both marketable and happy, but actually doing so isn't as easy as it sounds. The science behind how we learn is the foundation for teaching yourself new skills. Here's what we know about learning a new skill.
1
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"There is surely nothing quite so useless as doing with great efficiency what should not be done at all."
— Peter Drucker
“You know that old saw about a plane flying from California to Hawaii being off course 99% of the time—but constantly correcting? The same is true of successful startups—except they may start out heading toward Alaska.” —-Evan Williams ...
View original post
2
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
1+1 = 0

Math gets simpler in a world where 1+1=0, but it doesn't become self-contradictory and explode into nothing. We call this number system the field with 2 elements or F₂.

About a year ago, Greg Egan and I were studying a lattice in 8 dimensions called E8 lattice, and a lattice in 24 dimensions called the Leech lattice.

In the E8 lattice each point has 240 nearest neighbors. Let's call these the first shell. It also has 2160 second-nearest neighbors. Let's call these the second shell.

We noticed some cool things. For starters, you can take the first shell, rotate it, and expand it so that the resulting 240 points form a subset of the second shell!

In fact, there are 270 different subsets of this type. And if you pick two of them that happen to be disjoint, you can use them to create a copy of the Leech lattice inside E8⊕E8⊕E8 — that is, the direct sum of three copies of the E8 lattice! Egan showed that there are exactly 17,280 ways to do this.

Tim Silverman, a friend of mine in London, has been thinking about this ever since. And he found a nice way to understand it using the field with 2 elements.

As he explains:

“Everything is simpler mod p.” That is is the philosophy of the Mod People; and of all p, the simplest is 2. Washed in a bath of mod 2, that exotic object, the E8 lattice, dissolves into a modest orthogonal space, its Weyl group into an orthogonal group, its “large” E8 sublattices into some particularly nice subspaces, and the very Leech lattice itself shrinks into a few arrangements of points and lines that would not disgrace the pages of Euclid’s Elements. And when we have sufficiently examined these few bones that have fallen out of their matrix, we can lift them back up to Euclidean space in the most naive manner imaginable, and the full Leech springs out in all its glory like instant mashed potato.

Read the rest here:

https://golem.ph.utexas.edu/category/2016/01/integral_octonions_part_12.html

View original post
1
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
FORTRAN was not the first language to make the mistake of using the equal sign to mean assignment, but it was popular and influential. There were later languages that did not repeat that mistake, including ALGOL and BCPL. Unfortunately, C followed FORTRAN's example, compounding the mistake by making == the equality operator. JavaScript compounds C's mistake by making == unreliable. The fix, adding a === operator, does not seem much like a fix.

There is a very good argument that programming languages should not have any sort of assignment operator at all, but the mainstream of our profession is still not ready to hear that argument. But if there is an assignment operator, common sense should demand that it not be confused with the equality operator. Sadly, common sense rarely prevails in the design of popular programming languages. That is why JSLint prohibits use of assignment in expression position, comparison in statement position, and == in any position. Those prohibitions allow you to easily avoid a class of nasty bugs. JSLint's prohibitions do not prevent the crafting of good programs. They actually make it easier.

But reasoning about programming style is surprisingly difficult. For example, someone recently wrote this in the G+ JSLint community:

    I have definitely found cases were using assignment
    expressions create beautifully compact code that I
    think is much easier to read than the alternative.

The appeal to beauty gives this the appearance of a powerful argument. But beauty is at best subjective. Certainly in the arena of computer programs, there is not a standard of beauty, so that leads to the conclusion that all representations are acceptable because everything must be attractive to somebody.

But programs have a requirement that they be completely free of error. This requirement is imposed by the computers, because they give themselves license to do terrible things when our programs are not perfect. Perfection, not beauty, must be our goal. I too used to make emotional arguments about programming, and I too had no awareness of how vacant my arguments were.

JSLint has been my mentor on programming style. I did not write JSLint to force my sense of beauty on others. I wrote it to find defects in programs, specifically in my programs. JSLint taught me that if I care about the correctness of my programs, and that should always be our first concern, then I needed to correct my idea of what a good program looks like. We should seek to increase the visual distance between a good program and a bad one. We should not be creating beautiful pockets in which bugs can hide when there are better alternatives.
5 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Appreciating complex graphs made before computers
An incredible book, published in several editions from 1909 to 1933, by German mathematicians Eugene Jahnke and Fritz Emde, contains definitions and formulas
5 comments on original post
2
Andy Lo's profile photo
Andy Lo
+
1
2
1
 
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Man Who Saved Geometry

A beautiful portrait of the geometer Donald Coxeter and his ideas, whose geometry inspired Buckminster Fuller, helped Escher to draw, and illuminates our understanding of pineapples, air bags, and the shape of the universe itself.


Here's the article appeared in Toronto Life on January 2003:
DONALD COXETER: THE MAN WHO SAVED GEOMETRY by SIOBHAN ROBERTS
http://www.math.toronto.edu/mpugh/Coxeter.pdf
2
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
1,482 people
Sergio Enríquez's profile photo
Rapidsoft Technologies's profile photo
Wolf-Michael Bolle's profile photo
Silk manchester's profile photo
dodo la's profile photo
dj vikas's profile photo
Sharon Cheong's profile photo
AirMech's profile photo
muhammed khattak's profile photo

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Set up your own WiFi-enabled microcontroller w/ the open MQTT protocol and let your IoT devices talk to each other. Here’s how.
Ben shows how to set up a WiFi-enabled microcontroller to communicate with home IoT devices using the open MQTT protocol.
View original post
2
1
Frederick J. Calandra Jr.'s profile photoVladimir Bjelakovic's profile photo
 
Interesting
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The game of Go has been beyond the reach of computer play until now: the best Go programs could not match professional play. Now, Google's Deepmind department has a "new approach to computer Go that combines Monte-Carlo tree search with deep neural networks that have been trained by supervised learning, from human expert games, and by reinforcement learning from games of self-play. This is the first time ever that a computer program has defeated a human professional player."
Find within links to pages and papers, including a free to access copy of the Nature paper.
"In March 2016, AlphaGo will face its ultimate challenge: a 5-game challenge match in Seoul against the legendary Lee Sedol, the top Go player in the world over the past decade."
In a remarkable example of us being psychic (or, what’s also known as ‘a coincidence’), our recently posted introduction to the game of Go has been made more topical by actual Go-…
View original post
1
1
Vladimir Bjelakovic's profile photo
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Stories of projects that have made mistakes seeding a random number generator and better ways to do it.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Luca Luve

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Scientists have released an “expansion pack” for a virtual tour of the universe that you can enjoy from the comfort of your own computer. The latest version of the publicly accessible images of the sky roughly doubles the size of the searchable universe from the project’s original release in May.
View original post
1
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
1,482 people
Sergio Enríquez's profile photo
Rapidsoft Technologies's profile photo
Wolf-Michael Bolle's profile photo
Silk manchester's profile photo
dodo la's profile photo
dj vikas's profile photo
Sharon Cheong's profile photo
AirMech's profile photo
muhammed khattak's profile photo
Work
Skills
I “talk” to computers and lead people
Links
YouTube
Story
Tagline
Software "Gardener"/Software Craftsman. Knowledge-Hungry Learner. Constanter et non trepide.
Introduction
Constanter et non trepide.

It is not knowledge, but the act of learning, not possession but the act of getting there, which grants the greatest enjoyment. When I have clarified and exhausted a subject, then I turn away from it, in order to go into darkness again; the never-satisfied man is so strange if he has completed a structure, then it is not in order to dwell in it peacefully, but in order to begin another. I imagine the world conqueror must feel thus, who, after one kingdom is scarcely conquered, stretches out his arms for others. — J. C. F. Gauß (Letter to Farkas (Wolfgang) Bolyai, 1808)

Dimidium facti, qui coepit, habet: sapere aude, incipe — Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Epistulæ I, ii, 40)

Historia vero testis temporum, lux veritatis, vita memoriæ, magistra vitæ, nuntia vetustatis — Marcus Tullius Cicĕro (De Oratore II, ix, 36)
Bragging rights
I have “contributed to the construction of the tunnel between CERN and Gran Sasso Laboratories” (about 730 km!) - http://goo.gl/aOYsd
Basic Information
Other names
Zero Knowledge, 0Knowledge, zer0k, ZK