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Ben Shults
Diverse Interests And Approachable! PLEASE NOTE: I DO ON USE HANGOUTS* *IT'S DISABLED*
Diverse Interests And Approachable! PLEASE NOTE: I DO ON USE HANGOUTS* *IT'S DISABLED*
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+Glenn Murray​​
+Sue T​​
+Rob Salzman​​

Hello. One may not fully agree with this short video.
Nevertheless it's....
Well, make up your own minds. :)
IOU's, Govt Bonds, Bonds = Bondage.
Money V's Currency.

An Interesting, understandable breakdown of the "System"
(Read Scam) It's Worth a look. 

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"It's not what you think!"

Article Mark Mansion


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Do you derail yourself with positive thinking and giving yourself pep talks?

Article Mark Manson

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"YOU MAY WANT TO READ THIS AND LEARN WHAT YOUR DEVICES MICROPHONE MAY BE DOING!" 

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This article posted Friday 12th of May 2017. Via the Independent UK.

UK GOVT PAID £5.5 MILLION TO MICROSOFT FOR ONE EXTRA YEAR OF SUPPORT!

New variant has hit Spain and Russia hard, as well as the UK. Now spreading to other European countries and Asia.

More stories at the bottom of the article. Click on headline below to read story. 

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PLASTIC EATING CATERPILLARS

Let's hope something comes of this. The amount of toxic plastic waste, in the oceans, in rivers and lakes around the world is appalling! 

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GOOGLE REVEALS A SOPHISTICATED PHISHING SCAM. NBC NEWS 4TH OF MAY 2017

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Post Via +John Waters​​
& Ancient-Origins.net

An Interesting article. 

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INFORMATIVE AND AS USUAL MORE THAN INTERESTING.

POST VIA +Neuroscience Roi-Girard​
Technique developed to allow neuron-specific drug delivery to the brain
Researchers at Duke University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute report that they have developed a way to deliver drugs to specific types of neurons in the brain, providing the ability to study neurological diseases while also promising a more targeted way to treat them.
A new method named DART (drugs acutely restricted by tethering) may overcome these limitations. Developed by researchers at Duke University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, DART offers the first opportunity to test what happens when a drug is targeted exclusively to one cell type, according to the investigators.
In its inaugural study, DART reveals how movement difficulties in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease are controlled by the AMPA receptor (AMPAR), which is a synaptic protein that enables neurons to receive fast incoming signals from other neurons in the brain. The results reveal why a recent clinical trial of an AMPAR-blocking drug failed and offer a novel approach to using the pharmaceutical.
The team's paper ("Deconstructing Behavioral Neuropharmacology with Cellular Specificity") appears in the April 7th issue of Science.
"This study marks a major milestone in behavioral neuropharmacology," said Michael Tadross, Ph.D., assistant professor of biomedical engineering, who is in the process of moving his laboratory from the HHMI Janelia Research Campus to Duke. "The insights we gained in studying Parkinson's mice were unexpected and could not have been obtained with any previous method."
DART works by genetically programming a specific cell type to express a type of GPS beacon, known as a HaloTag, which is an enzyme borrowed from bacteria that is inert. It does nothing more than sit on the cell surface. Nothing, that is, until researchers deliver drugs loaded with a special homing device.
Researchers administer these drugs at such low doses that they do not affect other cells. Because the homing system is so efficient, however, the drug is captured by the tagged cells' surface, accumulating within minutes to concentrations that are 100 to 1,000 times higher than anywhere else.
In an experiment using a mouse model of Parkinson's disease, Dr. Tadross and colleagues attached the homing signal beacon to two types of neurons found in the basal ganglia—the region of the brain responsible for motor control. D1 type neurons are believed to give a "go" command. The other type, referred to as D2 neurons, is thought to do just the opposite, providing commands to stop movements.
Using DART, Dr. Tadross delivered an AMPAR-blocking pharmaceutical to only D1 neurons, only D2 neurons, or both. When delivered to both cell types simultaneously, the drugs improved only one of several components of motor dysfunction, mirroring the lackluster results of recent human clinical trials. The team then found that delivering the drug to only the D1/"go" neurons did absolutely nothing. Surprisingly, however, by targeting the same drug to D2/"stop" neurons, the mice's movements became more frequent, faster, fluid, and linear—in other words, much closer to normal.
While the drug stops neurons from receiving certain incoming signals, it does not completely shut them down. This nuance is particularly important for a subset of the D2 neurons that have two prominent forms of firing. With DART, these components could be manipulated separately, providing the first evidence that Parkinson's motor deficits are attributable to the AMPAR-based component of firing in these cells. Dr. Tadross said this level of nuance could not have been obtained with prior cell type-specific methods that completely shut neurons down.
"Already in our first use of DART, we've learned something new about the synaptic basis of circuit dysfunction in Parkinson's disease," he explained. "We've discovered that targeting a specific receptor on specific types of neurons can lead to surprisingly potent improvements."
Dr. Tadross is already looking into how this discovery might translate into a new therapy by delivering drugs to these neurons through an emerging viral technique. He is also beginning work to develop a version of DART that does not need the genetically added homing beacon to work.
http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/technique-developed-to-allow-neuron-specific-drug-delivery-to-the-brain/81254162
Illustration - This is an artist's rendition of how the new DART system works in a neural synaptic receptor. The red posts are the beacons that attract the white triangular "homing devices." This traps drugs (represented as hexagons) via a striped leash. [Julia Kuhl]
#brain #memory #synapse #synapses #consciousness #neuron #neuroscience #StemCells #neurobiology #dendrites #cells #DendriticSpines #HumanBrain #plasticity #neurology #medicine #DNA #interaction #SynapticTransmission #neurons #BrainCells #research #discovery #learning

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