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Suzi Eszterhas Wildlife Photography
Award-winning wildlife photographer, author, speaker and photo tour leader.
Award-winning wildlife photographer, author, speaker and photo tour leader.
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Two-month-old lion cubs, Londolozi Private Game Reserve, South Africa. Lion siblings often stay together for their whole lives. Male lion siblings usually stay together after being forced to leave the pride by the resident dominant males, usually when they reach 2½ to 3 years old. Female siblings usually remain with their pride for their whole lives. Love lions? Want to learn more about what you can do to help them? Follow or visit www.lionrecoveryfund.org.
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Tasmanian devil, Toorwana Wildlife Park, Tasmania. Check out the new Tasmanian devil image gallery here: http://ow.ly/pJ1L30fUWoC
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For the entire month of October I am donating 50% of all orangutan print sales from my online printshop at Baby Animal Prints by Suzi to the Sumatran Orangutan Society (SOS), of which I am a proud Patron. See more adorable prints here: http://ow.ly/cvoT30fSCam
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If you live anywhere near the fires that are decimating California please be aware that wild animals are fleeing the fires and they may show up in your yards. The California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection is urging you to bring your domestic animals in at night and let the wild animals pass through. Please put out -flat pans - (small animals may drown in buckets if they can't get out) of water for them - they are scared, exhausted, and have also lost their homes - they need to refuel.
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Cheetah mother resting with her eight-week-old cubs, Maaai Mara Conservancy, Kenya. When cubs are about 6-8 weeks old, their mother will lead them out of the nest onto the open plains. For the next 18-20 months they will live under their mother's protection in a sea of grass. Successfully raising cubs to adulthood is no small task for the mothers. Cheetah cub mortality under the age of three months is 95%, due to predation from lions, leopards, hyenas, jackals, and even birds of prey. For more information about cheetahs follow Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) and visit www.cheetah.org.
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Wild animals in the Sonoma/Napa fires are losing their homes too. Those that have survived and managed to escape will be thirsty. If you live in Sonoma and Napa counties please consider putting a bowl of water out in your yard. Also Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue is in need of the following items:
Financial Donations
Grains/COB
Any Variety of Leafy Greens (Kale, Collard Greens, Romaine, Spinach, etc)
Asparagus
Squash
Apples
Pears
Carrots, Carrot Tops
Grapes
Broccoli
Melons
Avocados
Berries
Any Variety of Fruit or Vegetable
For more info visit http://ow.ly/6qyG30fRTNW
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Wild animals in the Sonoma/Napa fires are loosing their homes too. Those that have survived and managed to escape will be thirsty. If you live in Sonoma and Napa counties please consider putting a bucket of water out in your yard, and a shallow dish for the smaller creatures.
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Red fox, Katmai National Park, Alaska. Foxes roam beaches during low tide to dig up small crustaceans under the sand.
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Eight-month-old koala joey, Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, Queensland, Australia. It's hard to imagine, but research by the Australian Koala Foundation revealed that at least 8 million koala were killed for the fur trade, with their pelts shipped to London, United States and Canada between 1888 and 1927. There are now fewer than 80,000 left in the wild, only 1 percent of those killed in the fur trade. The main threat to their survival is habitat loss. To learn more about what you can do to help visit www.savethekoala.com.
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Breeding pair of scarlet macaws at the Bosque del Cabo Rainforest Lodge, Costa Rica. Scarlet macaws mate for life. A pair will usually meet and bond when they are about three years old, the age in which they reach sexual maturity. They will then nest about every two years, not raising new chicks until their previous ones have fledged and are independent.
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