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Shea Evans
318 followers -
Food and Food Culture Photographer, Food Blogger, Food Lover, Music Obsessive, Explorer
Food and Food Culture Photographer, Food Blogger, Food Lover, Music Obsessive, Explorer

318 followers
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Mixed green salad with a soft boiled egg...

It took me a bit to set up the frame before I cracked the egg...

Lit from a large sliding glass door camera right, no bounce, processed with snapseed and vsco, shot with an iPhone5s
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Korean Tacos scene...

Sometimes I like pulling back from a simple food beauty to show the entire meal "scene". In this case, I looked for a table with bright light. Other tables had plenty of soft light, but sometimes I like hard shadows. I positioned the cup so the bottom would be in shadow but the ice and soda on top would catch the light as it came through the window. Next was to arrange the chips out of the bag and the tacos. I didn't have anything to bounce light so this is shot "naturally" light coming through a window to the upper left of the frame. Shot with an iPhone5s and processed with Snapseed and VSCO. I used the "selective adjust" in snapseed to lower the exposure on the bright areas and raise it in the shadows, as the original image had a bit too much contrast for me.
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Check out my recent interview with Wonderful Machine about my work profiling a restaurant for an editorial client.
Wonderful Machine Photography Blog
Wonderful Machine Photography Blog
blog.wonderfulmachine.com
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Hoppin John with sautéed chard for the new year... A couple of weeks back, :)

Shot with an iPhone 5s and processed with Snapseed and vsco.

This tabletop is actually on the floor. It has no legs, it's a backdrop that I constructed for my food photography. It's lit from the right by light through a large sliding glass door, but controlled by some photoflex panels so that I could direct the light on this dish better. In post processing I also lightened and darkened areas of the photograph to make a more diversely lit composition.
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Asparagus with Parmesan and Meyer lemon.

IPhone 5s processed with Snapseed and vsco. Direct sunlight coming though a window on the left side of the image, with a white bounce card to the right of the image.
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Fresh picked heirloom tomato salad...

I'm always looking for interesting backgrounds. I'm happy with a good tablecloth but I'm more drawn to something worn with some character. In this case, it's a well loved baking sheet I found at a used restaurant supply store.

IPhone 5s, natural window light coming from the top of the image with a single white bounce from the lower left corner of the frame. Processed with Snapseed and vsco.
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Kokanee Salmon with Rosemary and Thyme...

Just a quick shot with my iPhone, and processed through vsco. What I liked about this is that I walked the pan to door way light and then was able to tilt the pan just so the light just touched the fish and grill parts of the pan leaving shadows for definition.
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A couple of weeks back I got to create a bunch of new imagery for Mamasake in Squaw Valley to use for their promotional materials. They should be appearing in ads and websites soon but until then you can get a preview here:   http://www.sheaevans.com/Projects/Mamasake/thumbs/
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Beef tataki with black tobiko, jalapenos and ponzu sauce...

A couple of weeks ago, I was commissioned to create new imagery for a sushi bar in the Lake Tahoe area.  The shotlist was long, 10+ dishes of various types, cocktails, and portraits along with interior and exterior shots.  Beyond the shotlist was the consideration of how the final images would be used, which was across platforms, from social media and websites to print advertisements and media requests. 

How did this effect the shoot?  It simply meant that I needed to cover a range of crops and compositions.  For the web I needed to cover the gambit of horizontal crops, including banners, because this shape lends itself more to website designs (the horizontal version of this is the second image in the slideshow for my homepage, if you'd like to see a comparison), as that's usually the shape of the screen.   But for print and media requests, I needed some vertical shots as well as some with negative space.

Earlier in my career, I concentrated hard to fill my frame with visual information for my viewers , scattered ingredients here, a crumpled napkin with some crossed silverware there.  I thought it was wrong to just leave half of the image "blank", and "empty".  But what I believe now is that there are many advantages to this style.

1.  There is room for designers to put copy (writing/text) and logos, making a really clean advertisement for clients.

2.  Leaving negative space can give viewer's eyes a break.  When not trying to process every piece of visual information, they can focus on the "star" which is, after-all, the whole point right?  To be drawn in to the dish that you are showing them.  (In this shot, as you look at it, can you feel your eyes moving down to the tataki?)

3.  Having images like this in addition to the type that "fill frame" in your portfolio shows your versatility.  It also helps break it up a bit.  If an art director or buyer is looking at your stuff and five images in it's clear that you only "fill frame" or only "have negative space" or only shoot "overheads", that person might not be as likely to hire  you for their project.  But if you show them your versatility,  they're more likely to keep turning your pages, forwarding your slides, because they don't know what comes next, and they want to see what does.  Or maybe they've already got an idea in mind and want to see if you know how to do something similar.

This was lit with three SB-910s inside a Photek Softlighter II, with the diffuser attached.  It's my go-to "safe" modifier, because its BIG (5ft) across and mimics window light really well if you don't have it readily available.   The food itself was small in size, so I used a 105mm Macro to get close, while still trying to stay far enough away that it looked natural enough that a viewer could be looking at the dish with their naked eye.  

The light source is on the left and  I turned the plate just a bit to both get a diagonal line going (movement), but more importantly, make sure my light was getting into the fanned crevices created by the presentation of this dish.  If I left the plate "straight" the shadows between the slices of meat became a bit too dark for my liking. 

To the right (just out of frame) was a white bounce card, throwing light back into the shadows.  You can actually see the evidence of this on the sake cups in the background.  Notice on the left side of the cups, the white is the brightest.  That's the main light source.  Then there's a shadow, but then another lighter spot, yet much dimmer than the first, that's the effect of the white bounce card just out of frame.  Whenever I'm trying to figure out a lighting setup I see in an ad or editorial spread, I always look at the glassware, it rarely lies. 

Camera used was a Nikon D700, ISO 250, f7.1, 1/250
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Great Class with +Alexis Robin  tonight sharing and fueling ideas for more effective self promotion!
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