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Raymond Johnson
3,681 followers -
Mathematics Educator
Mathematics Educator

3,681 followers
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Hmm, do you suppose I can squeeze a fourth year out of my Nexus 6P? I guess I'm somewhat dismayed by the Pixel's price and lack of a headphone jack. The Nexus 6P was $500 at launch. Google seemed less interested in profit when other companies were building the phones back in the Nexus days.

With so many phones on the market, it's frustrating to not find many that tick just a few of my boxes:

* CDMA-compatable
* Front-facing speakers
* Headphone jack
* NFC
* A pretty vanilla version of Android that gets updated regularly
* $600 or less

In other words, I think I wish the Pixel 3 was really the Nexus 6P+3.
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I went to hear Dr. King speak for the first time as a young man in 1962 at Oakland Auditorium. I was an engineering and design major at college and I wasn't a part of any organization yet. The auditorium held 7,000 people and every seat was packed. He was speaking about boycotting the bread companies who were refusing to hire people of color. He talked about boycotting Wonder Bread and he said,"We're going to boycott them so consistently and so profoundly, we're going to make Wonder Bread wonder where the money went." I got enthusiastically involved with the civil rights movement after that. This is the man who first inspired me to be involved.

A few years later, I worked with and gave the Black Panther Party support to Dr. King on his Poor People's March. Dr. Ralph Abernathy called me personally and said "Mr. Seale, Dr. King would like to know if you would be willing to participate in a broad roundtable of organizations across the country working together in the struggle to end institutionalized racism." I said, "Yes, the Black Panther Party will definitely work with you and Dr. King on anything you want to do." People don't know that we crossed those lines.

Dr. King's legacy is manifested in moving to evolve and get rid of institutionalized racism in America. From the moral standpoint to the practical community organizing standpoint. It was about nonviolence and rightfully so. It was about the first amendment of the constitution. The first amendment of the Constitution gives all of us the right to peacefully assemble and address our grievances. At that time the power structure began to attack, murder, shoot, kill and brutalize peaceful demonstrators. In other words violating their constitutional, democratic, civil and human rights to organize, unify and educate the people.

When I look at Dr. King's legacy and what we stood up for, the amount of people that were killed in the civil rights protests and later in my organization - I had 28 Black Panther Party members killed in attacks from the police who were trying terrorize us out of existence - when I look at that I have a very great affinity for Dr. King and everything he inspired me to be.


All Power To All The People!
Bobby Seale
http://bobbyseale.com/

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#drmartinlutherking #blackpantherparty #bobbyseale
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Congratulations! Eric Stade has spent years working to improve mathematics instruction at CU Boulder, much of it in collaboration with math educators in CU's School of Education.
Eric Stade, University of Colorado, receives the 2018 AMS Award for Impact on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics for his many sustainable and replicable contributions to mathematics and mathematics education at both the pre-college and college levels.
"Thanks to the Committee on Education and the AMS for supporting undergraduate education--particularly work with pre-service teachers and lower-division offerings. These are the most inspiring and rewarding parts of my job, and the AMS sends a powerful message by valuing and promoting these things." http://bit.ly/2EeENum
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I spent time today cleaning up my circles here on Google+. A few thoughts:

There are still many people here quietly posting good content and I should be interacting with them more. +Michael Interbartolo keeps me posted about spaceflight, +Bryan Alexander thinks about education and the future, +Doug Hayes shows me pictures of mining ruins around Colorado, and +Laura Fokkena posts (after a bit of a hiatus) about teaching while dependent on learning management systems. Those are just some people who've posted in the past day or two, and I appreciate it.

I found a lot of accounts from people who used to post here but post no longer. I miss my tours of the Alaska wilderness from +Katie M, learning about +Liz Krane's learning of all the things, and most of all, the little cadre of math educators including +Amy Ellis, +Amanda Jansen, +Karl Kosko, +Kevin Moore, and +Carlos Castillo-Garsow. I know they're all still talking about math education elsewhere, and they should go where they want, but the time they spent here was helpful to me. It's great to see +Josh Fisher's Mathematics Education (K-12) circle at over 22,000 members, but I wish the non-Josh content in there was more consistent in quality.

About +Google+ itself: Initially, Google+ was all about circles and it didn't have communities or collections. Circles were a great yet ultimately misguided feature. Rarely did I feel the need to select the people I wished to have read my posts. If I wanted to post privately among a small group of people, circles were awkward because there was no way for everyone in that small group to keep their circle memberships in sync. Communities make far more sense for those things. Also, even though I might have put someone in my "academic publishing" or my "technology" circle, that didn't mean those people were going to post about those topics. Collections were the fix for that, at least for those people who take the time to consider the topics they post about and use them. I still think circles are important, but now I'm relying on the basic following, acquaintances, friends, and family circles, and I've emptied and deleted almost all of my fine-grained, super-topical circles. There really wasn't a reason for me to have separate circles for math education, math education researchers, education, and mathematics, unless you count the agony of trying to decide who belongs in all or some of those circles simultaneously. I don't think I need to do that anymore.

Lastly, I remain a Google+ optimist. Or maybe a realist. I've long grown tired of the technology press who jump to declare everything that's not either the biggest or growing the fastest as "dead." A service doesn't have to be the biggest or most popular to serve the needs of the people who use it. I now have a few hundred people circled, and probably at least half of those post at least a few times a month. Some post multiple times a day. That provides enough content to keep me coming back, and I'm really not desperate for more. It's also what isn't here that keeps me coming. I don't see advertising here, and the political commentary I do see is more thoughtful and contained than the ebbs and flows of micro-rage surging through Twitter. Also, given the recent news about Facebook, I think my hunch that Google would be a more responsible steward of my personal data might have been right. At least I hope I'm right, and continue to be, because I'm trusting Google with a lot of data -- including connections to a lot of people here on Google+.
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All caught up! This Week(s) in Math Ed for:

Jan 19: Equity-directed practices, Matthew Effect, Trusting Digits

Jan 26: Fraction video series, MARS lessons https://buff.ly/2EcVSJf

Feb 2: Teach the @#$^ math, positive attitudes https://buff.ly/2EikqjQ
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Super cool solar eclipse video from a weather balloon at 100,000 feet, courtesy of awesome folks at +University of Colorado Boulder.
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This Week in Math Ed: 6 questions to answer honestly, mapping school segregation, compass constructions, & more.
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This #openaccess collection from the last ICME is a pretty extensive resource for the latest thinking in mathematics education.
132 Open Access papers for FREE download! Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-62597-3 Share to more!
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This Week in Math Ed: Battling against perceptions of teaching and learning, cube conversations, the Great (?) American Teach-Off, answering honestly, and letting go. Research from JRME, JTE, JCS, TCR, TTE, Numeracy, and Philosophy of MEJ.
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Hibernation
It's the last half-hour of 2017 and I'm pushing out a post to keep my blogging streak alive. I can't imagine this is interesting to anyone else, but that's never really been what this blog is for. I could write more, and maybe I should write more, but the o...
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