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David desJardins
Worked at Google
Attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Lives in Burlingame CA
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David desJardins

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Mark Bittman says, in his opening sentence, that everyone he knows thinks we need more farmers. Seriously? If you're going to be a columnist for the New York Times, shouldn't you at least make some effort to meet some people who don't think exactly like you?
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As baffling as it is that more poor people don't vote (per your comment in The NYTs on June 24th), is the fact that they vote against their own best interests.  Nonetheless, we are at a place where the engagement of more voters is critically important.  My article at http://tiny.cc/thdhux explains how we got to now, and how to get beyond it.  @thefairelection
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David desJardins

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This is a great line. [Peggy] Siegal, prompted by the mayor’s absence from the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Ball, told The Wall Street Journal that Mr. de Blasio “had disdain for the striving, successful New Yorkers,” and that “it is a major shortcoming not to mingle with all classes,” as if she were a regular at game night at the Walt Whitman Houses.
The New York City mayor’s decline in public approval may stem from his demeanor more than his policies.
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Drew Fudenberg's profile photoDavid desJardins's profile photoJay Gischer's profile photo
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Thanks to both of you, +Drew Fudenberg and +David desJardins.  That's sort of what I expected.
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If F. A. O. Schwarz, which has been a fixture in New York City for 145 years and a character in the 1988 Tom Hanks film “Big,” is actively scouring Manhattan for a new, less costly location, is passive scouring even possible?  I would have thought that active scouring is the only form of scouring.
F.A.O. Schwarz, which has been a fixture in New York for 145 years and a character in the 1988 Tom Hanks film “Big,” is actively scouring Manhattan for a new, less costly location.
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Alex Franz's profile photoMatthew Lefkowitz's profile photo
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Scouring is how one removes graffiti. Manhattan could use more scouring. F.A.O. Schwarz is to be commended for scouring Manhattan actively.
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Wow, the report is compelling and damaging.  I was inclined to think there was no wrongdoing, but obviously I was mistaken.  Severe repercussions are in order (suspension for a season?).
Ted Wells’s report, released on Wednesday, found that “it is more probable than not” that Patriots personnel deflated the footballs in the A.F.C. championship game to gain an edge.
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Drew Fudenberg's profile photoDavid desJardins's profile photoMartijn van Schaardenburg's profile photo
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this explains a lot.
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What I would love is if, just once, the population of a major US city said collectively, "We're so damn mad about how we've been treated, you know what, we're all going to vote."
Armored vehicles lined the main roads, and thousands of police officers and National Guard troops poured in to maintain order.
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Matthew Lefkowitz's profile photoDavid desJardins's profile photo
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+Matthew Lefkowitz I agree that the biggest effect is not in municipal politics, although I don't think that effect is trivial, either. The biggest effect is on jurisdictions that contain cities, e.g., states.  The candidates for governor have to pay a lot more attention to the constituents in those cities if they vote at a much higher rate.  They will have considerably more representation in the state legislature.  And so on.
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David desJardins

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Democracy is really failing to address our water issues.  It's one of our biggest embarrassments in California.  We're wasting huge amounts of water growing almonds and alfalfa, and then we squeeze poor people for conservation that is completely unnecessary with huge water bills (relative to their income).  Meanwhile, wealthy people like me feel no moral obligation to conserve, because any water I save isn't going to help the poor urban users mentioned in articles like this one, it's just going to be squandered on agriculture.  Our unwillingness to adopt market solutions is leading to a breakdown of public cooperation.
The persistent water shortage is illustrating parallel worlds in which wealthy communities guzzle water as poorer neighbors conserve by necessity.
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Robert Greenwalt's profile photoLawrence Greenfield's profile photoDavid desJardins's profile photo
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+Lawrence Greenfield Well, food prices might be.
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David desJardins

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I sort of think we should use our prisons as an evolutionary tool for human improvement.  If you can figure out how to escape, without hurting anyone, maybe we should commute your sentence and give you a modest reward.
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Wei-Hwa Huang's profile photoDavid desJardins's profile photoBert Navarrete's profile photo
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David - we should chat next time you're here about an interesting company addressing these issues.  I'll send you a note separately.
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This is ridiculous: Reading, in particular, can’t be rushed. It has been around for only about 6,000 years, so the ability to transform marks on paper into complex meaning is not pre-wired into the brain. It doesn’t develop “naturally,” as do other complex skills such as walking; it can be fostered, but not forced. We know for sure that this is not true, because virtually every child of college-educated parents is going to be reading by 5 or so.  It's not their genes that explain why they are reading and children from poverty or whose parents have very little education sometimes aren't.  It's got to be 100% what they are exposed to, right?
Academic teaching in kindergarten backfires.
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David desJardins's profile photoJohn DesJardins's profile photoRobert McGwier's profile photoVibhu Mittal's profile photo
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John,  I can give you a concrete example.  I have an incoming Ph.D. student from an HBCU (Morgan State).  He was a security cleared intern to General Clapper (DNI).  His GPA was a bit low but other things intrigued me.  I found out that he was just doing super work in many areas.  So I worked hard to get in touch with him,  interviewed him on the phone,  brought him to Blacksburg and landed him as a Ph.D. student.  The thing I found is he was a super bright young man.  He was the oldest of five children of a single parent mom and was supporting his family AND going to school.  I and they pushed him to go do this and that in the end  they would all be better off.  The big agencies Dave and I have worked for are beating down my door to get him involved.  I have a model now for how this has to work.  I pick good students,  make sure they fit,  then I can do a world of good for them and the big government agencies help me help them. 
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I'm quoted today in the NYT saying the obvious---our democracy is seriously broken. "Effectively, I think everyone is resigned to the reality that every campaign of sufficient magnitude can and will have its own super PAC (or more than one) to get around campaign contribution limits,” David desJardins, a past donor to Priorities USA who has not yet committed to giving again, said in an email. “And they will just operate as an extension of the campaign itself, at least until the Supreme Court or Congress or F.E.C. says no.”
Hillary Rodham Clinton will begin personally courting donors for a super PAC supporting her candidacy, the first time a Democratic presidential candidate has fully embraced the groups.
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I'm not really liking this argument, at all.  The teacher is against asking students to understand and apply arguments from other points of view, even when they don't necessarily agree with them.  I think that actually is an important skill.  They should be able to describe why someone went on a solo trip around the world, and the logic that they applied to that, even if they wouldn't make the same decision themselves or even recommend it to others.
A teacher examines Common Core test questions after being trained in how to score the tests. Then she asks: 'What do I do as a teacher when asked to perform an act that goes against my conscience?
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John DesJardins's profile photoMark Bothwell's profile photoDavid desJardins's profile photoWei-Hwa Huang's profile photo
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Hm, it looks like there are some differences in question interpretation here.  The question is: "explain how [Zac] demonstrates the ideas described in [essay]".  David seems to be interpreting it as "explain how [Zac] demonstrates some of the ideas described in [essay]", whereas I think it could also be interpreted as "explain how [Zac] demonstrates all of the ideas described in [essay]".  The former is a reasonable question to expect students to be able to answer.  The latter is forcing students to argue for something they may not believe.  I do confess that when I read the question I had in mind the latter interpretation.
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I thought this was a Big Nothing until I read the article.  The Princeton student government is paying this guy $65,000 out of student fees to come to campus and insult women.  WTF??
Big Sean is to perform at Lawnparties in May, and protesters say his lyrics are inappropriate as the school tries to combat sexual misconduct; others cited free speech.
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I found this statement extremely stupid: The very point of enrolling at elite schools, of course, is to absorb the power and privilege that come with the degree. What the hell?  Isn't the point of college what you learn?
These young pioneers, the first in their families in college, are speaking out about who they are, where they come from and the income inequality on campus.
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Aalia Khan Yousafzai's profile photoDavid desJardins's profile photo
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+Aalia Khan Yousafzai Again, I definitely find it plausible that the pursuit of status is a big factor for international students coming to the US.  But I do hope that they get something more out of it, even if it wasn't their plan.  And I agree with you, regardless of what you were expecting, the actual value of college is mostly about what you learn, and not being besties with the trustafarians doesn't really seem like a problem.
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Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Mathematics, 1979 - 1983
  • University of California, Berkeley
    Mathematics, 1983 - 2002
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Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Work
Occupation
Consultant, Investor, Philanthropist
Employment
  • Google
    Software Engineer, 1999 - 2005
  • Center for Communications Research
    Research Staff Member, 1988 - 1999
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Currently
Burlingame CA
Previously
Princeton NJ
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