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Sarah Key
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Sarah Key is the author of the Back Sufferer's Bible and 3 other books on back pain.
Sarah Key is the author of the Back Sufferer's Bible and 3 other books on back pain.

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My Masterclasses are starting soon, it's still not to late to Join the Practical Adjuncts in Sydney May 3rd and 4th. Find out more here.
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Back Pain Relief At Hand
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IS YOUR LOW BACK PAIN VIRAL IN ORIGIN?
Acute, atypical back and leg pain that is non-responsive to conservative treatment may be caused by viral infection of the nerve roots. Practitioners of many years clinical experience know that it's common to see temporal clusters of cases with patients' signs and symptoms almost identical. Though common enough, this phenomenon has never been clearly explained.
Shingles is a viral infection of the spinal nerve roots known as herpes zoster. It typically causes severe burning pain both in the back and leg, the site of which (dermatome) depends on the spinal level where the nerve has been attacked. Usually, but not always, shingles is accompanied by a pustular rash, or blisters, over the skin area supplied by the inflamed nerve (although in some instances there may be a single blister only, or none at all). The back and/or leg pain is often described as 'excruciating burning pain' that comes on suddenly and may be associated with flu-like symptoms (weakness, lethargy and fever). Knee pain is often described as 'bursting' as if the knee is swollen.
I believe other types of viral nerve root inflammation is more common than you might think, with the virus gravitating to a spinal level already inflamed (by simple mechanical dysfunction or more advanced degenerative changes). In other words, viruses tend to roost in pre-existing hotspots of the spine.
The physical treatment is much the same as with normal mechanical back pain - that is, to dissipating the local inflammation by mobilising the jammed spinal link. But results are never as straightforward and you may require antiviral drugs as well.
And going back to shingles, anecdotal evidence dictates that ultraviolet (sunlight) during the pustular phase will clear up the rash sooner and be less likely to result in 'post herpatic pain'.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4592933/
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BENDING NORMALLY KEEPS LUMBAR DISCS HEALTHY!
For years there's been a popular misconception in back-treating circles that bending was bad for backs. It was assumed that bending caused the lumbar discs to bulge out the back - even possibly causing one unlucky one to 'slip' out backwards (prolapse) and pinch a spinal nerve. Not to put too fine a point on it, this naive perception of spinal dynamics totally discommoded the therapeutic back-treating world. For decades, physios told their patients never to bend. Not only did this totally disable patients, making them fearful and robotic in movement, it also made it difficult for them to go about their basic activities of daily living with blithe, unselfconscious abandon. And the introduced spinal rigidity actually caused their backs to break down faster, as the lack of movement starved the discs by denying them the natural suck and squirt mechanism that pulls disc nutrients in and expels waste products out. This 'mechanical pump' mechanism of nutritional exchange is critically important for discs as they do not have a blood supply. This fascinating piece of video footage shows just how effective the mini-bellows action of each disc is during bending.
Lumbar Disc Function - Flexion
Lumbar Disc Function - Flexion
neurodynamicsolutions.com
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STAND-UP DESKS, GOOD OR BAD?
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