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Jeremy VanGelder
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I like to play in the woods.
I like to play in the woods.

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A landmark of Northwest exploration, by Alexander Mackenzie, 1801

An essential account by Alexander Mackenzie of the first crossing of the North American continent by a European, including as well an early account of the Northwest fur trade.

According to Streeter,

“This is the classic account of Mackenzie’s journey from Fort Chipeway on Lake Athabasca, here called Lake of the Hills, down the river which bears his name to the sea and back in 1789. Even more important is the journal of the journey from the “New Establishment” on the Peace River to the Pacific Ocean (actually to “Mackenzie’s Rock” on Dean Channel), and the return to Fort Chipeway. This journey marked the first crossing of the continent by white men.”

Sabin’s assessment is equally if not more glowing:

“First and finest edition of the earliest expedition made by a white man in this direction. His investigations, although pursued at so early a period of Arctic exploration, were remarkable for their accuracy; Sir John Franklin more than once expressed his surprise at being able to corroborate their correctness in his own explorations. Some Indian vocabularies are included. “Of the vast region to which our Sovereign recently attached the name of British Columbia geographers have as yet but a scant and very imperfect account. Its first great explorer was my honoured countryman Mackenzie, who, traversing the Rocky Mountains and reaching the sea after incredible labour, left us an excellent record of his exploits.”—Sir R. I. Murchison’s Address to Rl. Geog. Soc., May 23, 1859.”

The volume features three valuable maps, including a general map of Canada with Mackenzie’s two routes highlighted in watercolor. It is “reduced by Mr. Arrowsmith from his three-sheet map of North-America, with the latest discoveries, which he is about to republish.” (p. ix) The other two maps are at a much larger-scale and depict his two routes in much greater detail.

Beyond its intrinsic significance, it is said that President Jefferson’s reading of the Voyages prompted him to initiate the Lewis and Clark expedition. They carried his book with them, and one writer has described it as “a methodological and literary model” for them. (David Nicandri, “Lewis and Clark: Exploring under the Influence of Alexander Mackenzie.” The Pacific Northwest Quarterly, vol. 95, no. 4 (Fall 2004), p. 171.)

See the details and maps: https://bostonraremaps.com/inventory/alexander-mackenzie-voyages-1801/
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The Crown: the one show on Netflix which shows a good marriage.
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If you think back to the Satanic panic of the late 1980s, when court after court listened to self-described experts claiming that their intensive, impeccable research proved kids were being ritually abused by animal-sacrificing, blood-drinking, orgy-organizing day care workers, you know that expert testimony sometimes isn't. In fact, sometimes it's completely, outrageously wrong.

That turns out to be tragically true again, this time in Canada, where from 1990 until 2015, family courts trusted the results of drug testing done on strands of hair by the Motherisk test lab. Ontario authorities were taking the kids away from mothers based on Motherisk's "hair-testing," which supposedly revealed the mothers were alcoholics or drug abusers.
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"The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn and relearn." - Alvin Toffler

The dude who brought this to my attention was talking about the internet and all its information. But of course humility has always been the basis of true learning.
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"The murder of 17 innocent high school students in Parkland, Florida reminds us that public schools are dangerous. Too dangerous for children.

Yet there are pro-public school ideologues who refuse to face the facts. They shut their eyes to reality. They spout their slogan: "Public schools don't kill public school students. Killers kill public school students." We have heard this for 50 years. Yet the killers are always one of these: (1) enrolled public school students, (2) public school graduates, or (3) expelled public school students. It's time to turn a deaf ear on the refrain about public schools not killing public school students.

When was the last time you heard of a mass execution of students in a private school? The next time will be the first."
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Yet another reason to stay on Windows 7.
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+Kirk VanGelder If we get this we could have a lift wherever we need it.
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