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Richard Ssekibuule
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Incidentally GMO laws are not yet in place in Uganda and probably the reason why tests are being carried out in Iowa.

http://www.kpbs.org/news/2014/jul/08/globe-trotting-gmo-bananas-arrive-for-their-first/

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I wonder what the power situation would be for large scale solar power generation in Uganda with our unique positioning at the Equator?

I've not been to Japan, but I imagine Uganda and Africa in general experiences more sunshine than other parts of the world.

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This is an old article that I think is still worthy of notice ... I think big data relies fundamentally on the principles of statistics in a more attractive  ('sexy') sense. Why then not add this spice to our university programs most especially in the developing world? 

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Looks like there's a big gap between a good technological idea/tool and business success/profitability ... twitter is clearly a good case-study.

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Hold-on before you connect your toilet to the Internet ... an interesting read on security of embedded systems.

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Recent NSA reforms seem to suggest that whistle-blowing is a good thing for democracy. Could it be feasible to develop systems for governance that will allow 'safe' or 'acceptable' whistle-blowing without hunting the likes of Snowden? I wonder whether these reforms also suggest that Snowden should be welcomed back to the US by the President in recognition of his determination to fight for civil liberties?

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An interesting approach to mitigating conflicts. 

"Intel will no longer use minerals mined in conflict zones to build its microprocessors, the company has said. Speaking at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Intel's chief executive Brian Krzanich urged the "entire industry" to follow suit. Gold, tungsten and other minerals used in electronics manufacturing are mined in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and surrounding countries. Production and trade of the materials are often controlled by armed groups. Intel's policy comes after increased international pressure for technology firms to investigate the sources of their raw minerals."

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25636001

I am skeptical whether Africans will kill each other less with these manufacturing approaches. Economic forces may dictate otherwise. The largest consumers of these electronics are not in conflict zones, yet their spending power is large enough to change the most advanced democracies. 

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Developing countries such as Uganda are likely to benefit more from this free high-quality education ...

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